Inspiring the serious marketer in you: Hitting the Mark email benchmark report 2018 is here

We’ve expanded our remit. Our sample now includes a mix of big and small companies, across three continents with the inclusion of Asia-Pacific (APAC), as well as incorporating brands from the B2B sector.  It’s our biggest, beefiest benchmark report – and now it’s truly relevant on a global scale.

Even more insights to dive into

Some of our findings echo last year’s report. There are still several brands out there failing to adopt simple automation programs, most notably a welcome program. Similarly, 56 of the 100 brands still aren’t utilizing cart recovery emails – crazy when you think about the massive opportunity for ROI presented by triggered campaigns. These are quick and easy wins that many companies continue to miss.

However, our wider scope offers marketers some new insights too. We’ve found that B2C businesses are outperforming B2B thanks to their wider adoption of basic automation, and they offer a better post-purchase experience. In the APAC region, brands aren’t making the most of data-driven tactics causing them to lag behind their US and UK rivals when it comes to personalizing content and making it relevant to their customers.

In our 2018 benchmark report, we’ll show you how and why some retailers are winning big and reveal the faux pas that can make a massive difference to your profits.

Real results for winning practices

The overall winner, hitting the mark across all our criteria, was a young, UK brand that’s rapidly expanding across Europe. This is in no small part thanks to its hyper-targeted email marketing strategy which proved the perfect technique to win, serve and retain its customers.

This brand never missed an opportunity to send abandoned cart prompts, personalized subject lines and tailored content based on past activity and preferences. The company has made significant and commendable improvements for 2018; especially as it scored 0 for abandoned cart emails and segmentation in last year’s report, ranking in the mid-30s overall. What an achievement! Customers were made to feel valued and given a reason to keep coming back and remain loyal to the brand.

The brand has clearly implemented the winning practices outlined in Hitting the Mark 2017, allowing it to forge a powerful and compelling email marketing strategy. We’ve taken an in-depth look at the tactics that have inspired this epic turnaround, so you can get there too.

What do you need to do to top next year’s Hitting the Mark?

Read Hitting the Mark in full today to get the low-down on all our dos and don’ts that make up a fantastic email marketing campaign.

If you’re a dotmailer client, don’t forget to talk to your account manager for advice and tips on how to put these into action. Interested in how dotmailer can help your business hit the mark? Take a free tour of our platform at a time that suits you.

The post Inspiring the serious marketer in you: Hitting the Mark email benchmark report 2018 is here appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 days ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Time to Act: Review Responses Just Evolved from "Extra" to "Expected"

Posted by MiriamEllis

I’ve advocated the use of Google’s owner response review feature since it first rolled out in 2010. This vital vehicle defends brand reputation and revenue, offering companies a means of transforming dissatisfied consumers into satisfied ones, supporting retention so that less has to be spent on new customer acquisition. I consider review responses to be a core customer service responsibility. Yet, eight years into the existence of this feature, marketing forums are still filled with entry-level questions like:

  • Should I respond to reviews?
  • Should I respond to positive reviews?
  • How should I respond to negative reviews?

Over the years, I’ve seen different local SEO consultants reply in differing degrees to these common threads, but as of May 11, 2018, both agencies and brands woke to a new day: the day on which Google announced it would be emailing notifications like this to consumers when a business responds to their reviews, prompting them to view the reply.

Surveys indicate that well over 50% of consumers already expect responses within days of reviewing a business. With Google’s rollout, we can assume that this number is about to rise.

Why is this noteworthy news? I’ll explain exactly that in this post, plus demo how Moz Local can be a significant help to owners and marketers in succeeding in this new environment.

When “extra” becomes “expected”

In the past, owner responses may have felt like something extra a business could do to improve management of its reputation. Perhaps a company you’re marketing has been making the effort to respond to negative reviews, at the very least, but you’ve let replying to positive reviews slide. Or maybe you respond to reviews when you can get around to it, with days or weeks transpiring between consumer feedback and brand reaction.

Google’s announcement is important for two key reasons:

1) It signals that Google is turning reviews into a truly interactive feature, in keeping with so much else they’ve rolled out to the Knowledge Panel in recent times. Like booking buttons and Google Questions & Answers, notifications of owner responses are Google’s latest step towards making Knowledge Panels transactional platforms instead of static data entities. Every new feature brings us that much closer to Google positioning itself between providers and patrons for as many transactional moments as possible.

2) It signals a major turning point in consumer expectations. In the past, reviewers have left responses from motives of “having their say,” whether that’s to praise a business, warn fellow consumers, or simply document their experiences.

Now, imagine a patron who writes a negative review of two different restaurants he dined at for Sunday lunch and dinner. On Monday, he opens his email to find a Google notification that Restaurant A has left an owner response sincerely apologizing and reasonably explaining why service was unusually slow that weekend, but that Restaurant B is meeting his complaint about a rude waiter with dead air.

“So, Restaurant A cares about me, and Restaurant B couldn’t care less,” the consumer is left to conclude, creating an emotional memory that could inform whether he’s ever willing to give either business a second chance in the future.

Just one experience of receiving an owner response notification will set the rules of the game from here on out, making all future businesses that fail to respond seem inaccessible, neglectful, and even uncaring. It’s the difference between reviewers narrating their experiences from random motives, and leaving feedback with the expectation of being heard and answered.

I will go so far as to predict that Google’s announcement ups the game for all review platforms, because it will make owner responses to consumer sentiment an expected, rather than extra, effort.

The burden is on brands

Because no intelligent business would believe it can succeed in modern commerce while appearing unreachable or unconcerned, Google’s announcement calls for a priority shift. For brands large and small, it may not be an easy one, but it should look something like this:

  • Negative reviews are now direct cries for help to our business; we will respond with whatever help we can give within X number of hours or days upon receipt
  • Positive reviews are now thank-you notes directly to our company; we will respond with gratitude within X number of hours or days upon receipt

Defining X is going to have to depend on the resources of your organization, but in an environment in which consumers expect your reply, the task of responding must now be moved from the back burner to a hotter spot on the stovetop. Statistics differ in past assessments of consumer expectations of response times:

  • In 2016, GetFiveStars found that 15.6% of consumers expected a reply with 1–3 hours, and 68.3% expected a reply within 1–3 days of leaving a review.
  • In 2017, RevLocal found that 52% of consumers expected responses within 7 days.
  • Overall, 30% of survey respondents told BrightLocal in 2017 that owner responses were a factor they looked at in judging a business.

My own expectation is that all of these numbers will now rise as a result of Google’s new function, meaning that the safest bet will be the fastest possible response. If resources are limited, I recommend prioritizing negative sentiment, aiming for a reply within hours rather than days as the best hope of winning back a customer. “Thank yous” for positive sentiment can likely wait for a couple of days, if absolutely necessary.

It’s inspiring to know that a recent Location3 study found that brands which do a good job of responding to reviews saw an average conversion rate of 13.9%, versus lackluster responders whose conversion rate was 10.4%. Depending on what you sell, those 3.5 points could be financially significant! But it’s not always easy to be optimally responsive.

If your business is small, accelerating response times can feel like a burden because of lack of people resources. If your business is a large, multi-location enterprise, the burden may lie in organizing awareness of hundreds of incoming reviews in a day, as well as keeping track of which reviews have been responded to and which haven’t.

The good news is…

Moz Local can help

The screenshot, above, is taken from the Moz Local dashboard. If you’re a customer, just log into your Moz Local account and go to your review section. From the “sources” section, choose “Google” — you’ll see the option to filter your reviews by “replied” and “not replied.” You’ll instantly be able to see which reviews you haven’t yet responded to. From there, simply use the in-dashboard feature that enables you to respond to your (or your clients’) reviews, without having to head over to your GMB dashboard or log into a variety of different clients’ GMB dashboards. So easy!

I highly recommend that all our awesome customers do this today and be sure you’ve responded to all of your most recent reviews. And, in the future, if you’re working your way through a stack of new, incoming Google reviews, this function should make it a great deal easier to keep organized about which ones you’ve checked off and which ones are still awaiting your response. I sincerely hope this function makes your work more efficient!

Need some help setting the right review response tone?

Please check out Mastering the Owner Response to the Quintet of Google My Business Reviews, which I published in 2016 to advocate responsiveness. It will walk you through these typical types of reviews you’ll be receiving:

  • “I love you!”
  • “I haven’t made up my mind yet.”
  • “There was hair in my taco…”
  • “I’m actually your competitor!”
  • “I’m citing illegal stuff.”

The one update I’d make to the advice in the above piece, given Google’s rollout of the new notification function, would be to increase the number of positive reviews to which you’re responding. In 2016, I suggested that enterprises managing hundreds of locations should aim to express gratitude for at least 10% of favorable reviews. In 2018, I’d say reply with thanks to as many of these as you possibly can. Why? Because reviews are now becoming more transactional than ever, and if a customer says, “I like you,” it’s only polite to say, “Thanks!”. As more customers begin to expect responsiveness, failure to acknowledge praise could feel uncaring.

I would also suggest that responses to negative reviews more strongly feature a plea to the customer to contact the business so that things can be “made right.” GetFiveStars co-founder, Mike Blumenthal, is hoping that Google might one day create a private channel for brands and consumers to resolve complaints, but until that happens, definitely keep in mind that:

  1. The new email alerts will ensure that more customers realize you’ve responded to their negative sentiment.
  2. If, while “making things right” in the public response, you also urge the unhappy customer to let you make things “more right” in person, you will enhance your chances of retaining him.
  3. If you are able to publicly or privately resolve a complaint, the customer may feel inspired to amend his review and raise your star rating; over time, more customers doing this could significantly improve your conversions and, possibly, your local search rankings.
  4. All potential customers who see your active responses to complaints will understand that your policies are consumer-friendly, which should increase the likelihood of them choosing your business for transactions.

Looking ahead

One of the most interesting aspects I’m considering as of the rollout of response notifications is whether it may ultimately impact the tone of reviews themselves. In the past, some reviewers have given way to excesses in their sentiment, writing about companies in the ugliest possible language… language I’ve always wanted to hope they wouldn’t use face-to-face with other human beings at the place of business. I’m wondering now if knowing there’s a very good chance that companies are responding to feedback could lessen the instances of consumers taking wild, often anonymous potshots at brands and create a more real-world, conversational environment.

In other words, instead of: “You overcharged me $3 for a soda and I know it’s because you’re [expletive] scammers, liars, crooks!!! Everyone beware of this company!!!”

We might see: “Hey guys, I just noticed a $3 overcharge on my receipt. I’m not too happy about this.”

The former scenario is honestly embarrassing. Trying to make someone feel better when they’ve just called you a thief feels a bit ridiculous and depressing. But the latter scenario is, at least, situation-appropriate instead of blown out of all proportion, creating an opening for you and your company to respond well and foster loyalty.

I can’t guarantee that reviewers will tone it down a bit if they feel more certain of being heard, but I’m hoping it will go that way in more and more cases.

What do you think? How will Google’s new function impact the businesses you market and the reviewers you serve? Please share your take and your tips with our community!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 4 days ago from tracking.feedpress.it

The true taste of success: Monin stays connected to customers and understands what drives them

To inspire brand loyalty, you need to stay connected and understand what interests your customers. Why should they keep coming back? What can you offer them that a competitor can’t?

dotmailer gives you access to seamless integrations with ecommerce platforms, such as Magento, to help you achieve real results. Take the world-famous syrup brand Monin, for example, whose products adorn restaurants, coffee shops and bars in over 160 countries. The brand recognized that, to meet the needs of its diverse customer base, they needed to bring their ecommerce and email closer together.

We’ve been working closely with Monin since 2015, helping the brand create an effective content strategy, refine its automation programs and improve its audience segmentation. This was made possible by the insight that the dotmailer-for-Magento integration offers.

The brand’s success has been considerable, and we’re delighted to announce that Monin was shortlisted for the Imagine Excellence Award with dotmailer – for Commerce Marketing Team of the Year 2018.

Bringing the in-store experience online

Understanding that content was a key driver of engagement, Monin focused on generating ideas that perfectly paired dotmailer and Magento. To complement a new email campaign, Monin populated their website with relevant content – from recipes to ‘Tips & Techniques’. A super-smooth path to purchase was on the cards for customers; a call to action on the perfect iced latte experience drove readers to click through, read an inspirational blog, and head to the checkout – equipped with the syrups needed to recreate it themselves.

Getting the right message to the right customer – at the right time

To tackle the midweek lull in traffic, Monin combined the insights gathered from Magento and dotmailer to identify preferences based on user behavior. The brand was then able to target specific content and promotions to these segments. Utilizing our WebInsight tool, Monin tracked customers’ browsing history, enabling them to curate content and recommend products based on previous purchases, recently-visited product pages and abandoned cart items.

The brand’s biggest success story was its carefully planned ‘Monin Mondays’ campaign, capitalizing on slow Mondays and Tuesdays: days with typically low levels of orders. The campaign was run routinely – four to five times a year – and specifically targeted lapsed customers, those yet to make a purchase and VIPs. Spontaneously landing in inboxes with hard-hitting discounts, this campaign boosted sales by a phenomenal 400%!

These new tactics, harnessing the data and capabilities of dotmailer and its integration with Magento, have contributed to a dramatic increase in Monin’s online sales. There has been a 20% increase in conversion rates and a 10% lift in revenue generated by email. Job well done, Monin!

For more inspiration about how dotmailer can help you, visit our customer success page or contact your account manager.

What are the Imagine Excellence Awards?

Imagine is the annual conference hosted by Magento. One of the highlights of the conference is the Imagine Excellence Awards, announced on the day of the event. They celebrate the achievement in leadership, innovation, teamwork and impact of Magento merchants, developers and partners over the previous twelve months.

In 2018, they received 250 submissions across 16 categories. Those nominated are shining examples of innovation, customer experience, design, and business acumen.

 

The post The true taste of success: Monin stays connected to customers and understands what drives them appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 week ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Google updates mobile-friendly test, rich results test tools to better support JavaScript sites

Is your site heavily built in JavaScript? No worries. Google just updated two of its popular tools to support it.

The post Google updates mobile-friendly test, rich results test tools to better support JavaScript sites appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 week ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Google updates recipe markup for Google Search & Google Assistant

Google requires that the recipeIngredient and recipeInstructions properties for recipes work on Google Assistant.

The post Google updates recipe markup for Google Search & Google Assistant appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

 Web design differences between B2C & B2B (and what works for both!)

Web design is a powerful way to appeal to the type of person who wants to buy your product. But how does it differ between B2C versus B2B? Understanding the differences in web design best practices between consumer retail and business sales is key to succeeding in e-commerce, especially if you’re transitioning or expanding your offering.

Understanding your buyer

B2B and B2C buyers have similarities, but in many respects, they’re very different. Throughout the article, keep in mind that the core difference between the two is the motivation of your audience:

  • B2B buyers’ primary goal is to solve a logical, objective problem. Their secondary goal is to show their superiors or stakeholders that they are valuable to the company.
  • B2C buyers’ primary goal may be to solve a logical, objective problem, but it may also be to fulfill an emotional need. Their secondary goal is to feel better about their quality of life.

In addition to their motivations, business buyers and consumers have expectations for what a “good” and “trustworthy” e-commerce website looks like, depending on your industry. This is why you’ll often find that competitors that are vying for the same audience will have very similar layouts, even if the design components – color, logo, content, and icons – are unique to each brand. You don’t want to be too different from your competitors, or your audience may subconsciously lose trust in your brand.

B2B buyers will also need a more complicated website design than B2C (generally speaking), as the price point is so much higher, and often, business products come with ongoing maintenance. An e-commerce website that sells to brands may require secure logins that lead to an existing customer portal, the ability to offer quantity-based pricing based on several factors, alternative payment methods and lines of credit, and buying approval controls, among other factors. On the other side of the spectrum, B2C e-commerce should aim to get customers to checkout as soon as possible and focus on removing any barriers to checkout. For personal consumers, often, the simpler the website, the more effective.

B2B and B2C design differences

B2B buyers are looking for a solution to a problem that their organization faces, which means that they’re looking for details and proof of value when they examine vendor’s e-commerce websites. They’re also looking for a solution that makes them look intelligent and resourceful to their boss or board members – which is an important detail to remember when working on your web design. The best product will be passed over if the website looks silly or untrustworthy, because your lead either won’t trust it themselves, or won’t feel comfortable sharing it with their team.

B2C customers are also looking for a website that looks trustworthy, but it’s often not their main priority (as long as it doesn’t look untrustworthy). For many retail purchases, the customer is looking for a website that shows them a lifestyle that they aspire to, or that makes them feel good about themselves. They don’t need to justify their purchase to anyone else, so the focus is on persuading the current viewer that your product will make them happier.

Calls to action

Because B2B buyers work with a team to decide on purchases, and must justify their choice to several people, web design that appeals to businesses should allow for a much longer sales cycle than B2C sales.

To appeal to the business buyer, make sure that your calls to action don’t appear prematurely on your e-commerce website. This means avoiding big calls to action that demand a purchase immediately – they’re just unrealistic, as most B2B buyers will need to return to your site at least five times before they’re ready to contact you.

Instead, focus on CTAs that drive your viewers towards further information, such as your blog or resources related to the product they viewed, and that result in you capturing contact information such as their email address. Getting contact info will give you a path to reactivate their interest later down the line, and keep the conversation going over time. Pique viewers interests with account registrations, free quote requests, whitepaper downloads, and other sign-ups that offer immediate value with little risk.

On the other hand, B2C customers may react favorably to calls to action. Our favorite example is our client Joe Grooming: on their website, we kept a minimalist design, but added the detail that every “buy” button on their product pages matches the unique Pantone color assigned to the product.

Length and detail of content

According to Komarketing’s 2015 B2B Web Usability Report, 46% of B2B buyers report rejecting potential vendors because their website is unclear about what exactly they do. That same report also found that 42% left e-commerce websites immediately when served an animated ad or popup (such as for e-books or mailing signups).

When creating your B2B web design, keep in mind that your viewer is busy, under pressure, and looking for answers. They don’t want to be distracted and feeling like their time being wasted will make them move on to your competitors’ websites.

The bottom line: your B2B website needs more content than a B2C e-commerce site, but you must be strategic in what content you produce. Focus on articles, original surveys, and detailed product descriptions that compliment your homepage that states clearly and succinctly what your company does.

A great example of a brand that hits all these points is Polycom, one of – if not the – most ubiquitous office telecom brands. Their e-commerce website focuses on making it very clear where visitors should click, almost to a fault, with this grid, which appears right below their hero image:

By literally spelling out the most likely thoughts a viewer may have when they navigate to the site, Polycom is able to minimize the amount of time visitors spend between seeing the home page and finding a product that solves their problem.

Web design principles that apply to both B2B and B2C

While the goals and motivations of B2B and B2C customers differ, you’re still appealing to people who want to feel good about buying from your brand. Focus on how you can assure each customer that your brand is watching out for them, and they’ve made the right choice and gotten the best deal. If your e-commerce site effectively communicates these things, you’ll see your sales – and loyal customers – increase steadily.

Intuitive navigation

Nobody wants to spend time clicking around a cluttered website. A disorganized online presence is one of the most reliable ways to drive away customers, no matter if you sell makeup or enterprise software. Focus on making web design choices that intuitively prompt users towards the next step in their customer journey, without taking them on any unnecessary detours.

Emotional appeals

Both consumers and business buyers want to emotionally connect to your brand, as well as feel like they made the right logical choice. In fact, according to CMSWire, 10 to 40 percent of consumers form emotional attachments to brand before purchasing, and over 50 percent of business buyers felt emotionally connected to their vendors. If you’re wondering why, try to imagine trusting a group of people for purely logical reasons – it’s almost impossible. We’re all human, after all.

When you create your web design, make sure that it appeals to your customers’ hearts as well as their minds. A quick cheat sheet: include images with people in them, especially if they’re making eye contact with the user. Understand the emotional impact of color schemes. Lastly, write your content as if you’re speaking to the person reading it.

Performance optimization

Last but not least, a site that doesn’t load quickly, has buttons that don’t work, or is otherwise sloppy in its execution will kill your brand. According to Kissmetrics, your site should load in under 3 second, with 2 seconds being ideal. Think the stakes aren’t high enough? 79% of shoppers that leave your website because it’s slow will never come back, and 44% will tell their friends about it.

When creating your web design – or selecting a web designer – make sure to prioritize page load time. If it comes down to that high-quality animation playing in the background, or shaving a few seconds off your load time, pick the latter.

If you don’t like it, neither will they

At the end of the day, much of web design is about common sense. Does your site look appropriate for your customers? Does it work correctly? Can your visitors find what they’re looking for? Great web design answers all of these questions with a resounding “yes!”

Remember, no matter who you’re selling to, they’re a human who wants to feel that they’re making the right choice. Your web design is the primary way that they learn what your brand stands for, who your products are meant for, and whether they can trust you – so make sure you’re communicating with your audience effectively by investing in a great website.

The post  Web design differences between B2C & B2B (and what works for both!) appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018

On a gorgeous April day, over 1,000 international marketers gathered at the Park Plaza in the heart of London to discover even greater digital potential. This year’s event was jam-packed with inspiring talks, breakout sessions and technical workshops designed to help our delegates advance their day-to-day marketing. There was so much going on during the day that you had to be super switched on to catch it all. In case you missed any of the highlights, here are our top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018:

  1. Powerful and empowering women in business

It’s safe to say that the 2018 Summit played host to some serious titans of the industry, and we were thrilled to see the agenda opened and closed by two powerful and empowering women. Natalie Nahai, author and web psychologist, showed us how she advises Fortune 500 companies like Google, eBay and Unilever how to use online persuasion to win over and retain business. We learned about homophily, cognitive load and how to engage with customers in a more meaningful way.

Our keynote speaker this year was Baroness Karren Brady, one of the most influential, high profile and respected female business leaders in the UK and rated among the 50 most inspirational people in the world. Karren gifted us her own top 10 ingredients for success along with a witty, provocative and inspiring insight into her career journey.

  1. GDPR reassurance

It was easy to predict that GDPR would feature heavily on the agenda this year, but the key takeaways were far from dry, doomy and gloomy. In his primary session, dotmailer’s Strategy & Insight Director, Skip Fidura, showed us to treat GDPR as an opportunity to strengthen our data and build more compelling, trusted relationships with customers through automation. And Rachel Aldighieri, Managing Director at the DMA, got us thinking about how marketers can work effectively and creatively within these new parameters.

  1. 1,142 delegates

After welcoming over 600 marketers last year at dotmailer’s inaugural Summit, we set out to make 2018 a year of international empowerment. Watching over 1,000 digital marketers discover, grow and network throughout the day was one of our highlights. In fact, dotmailer’s CEO, Phil Draper, let it get to his head a little. Here he is pretending to be his favorite artist, Ed Sheeran:

  1. Twitter trending

While the hottest news on 19th April was undoubtedly the 26° heat (welcome to the UK!), it was awesome to see #dotmailersummit take the no.2 spot on Twitter as an equally hot topic. We loved checking in throughout the day to see so many empowered marketers tweet their key learnings from our knowledgeable speakers. Plus, it’s always good to know the lunch went down a treat!

  1. 849 app downloads

The dotmailer Summit 2018 welcomed 30 international speakers to deliver on 27 session topics across three speaking tracks – so we wanted to make sure delegates could get organized. Marketers in attendance were able to follow, schedule and query every session using our free dotmailer Summit app. With ¾ of attendees making use of the app on the day, you can bet it’ll be back for 2019.

  1. Launching an evolved dotmailer

2018 Summit delegates were able to get a first look at the brand-new innovations happening within the dotmailer platform. With 27% of revenue generated by automation over batch-and-blast campaigns, marketers need to be able to flex their mailing muscles. dotmailer users now have access to 30 new free automation programs to help them deliver on rising customer expectations. In order to help our customers hit every contact on the right channel, we’ve incorporated Facebook Messenger into the platform, and our new COMAPI acquisition brings sophisticated SMS capabilities on-board. Add free Facebook Audience and Google Adword Re-targeting to every account, chuck BigQuery into the mix and you’ve got a souped-up omnichannel automation platform with no need to pay for a complementary tech provider. Oh – and we’ve added a native product recommendations tool. Innovating dotmailer, empowering you!

  1. Hitting the Mark 2018

Summit attendees were the first to gain access to insight from dotmailer’s biggest and beefiest benchmarking report, Hitting the Mark. Attendees were able to snap up the latest statistics on segmentation, as well as learn how many brands are still leaving money on the table by failing to send an abandoned cart email. Plus, we revealed this year’s number one marketer. Want to find out for yourself? Download the full report.

  1. Wayne Hemmingway

One of the most inspirational talks from the day came from Red or Dead and Hemingway designs co-founder, Wayne Hemingway, who showed the audience that “Design is about improving the things that matter in life.” The compelling businessman – who’s provided sustainable designs for tube uniforms, student accommodation and entire housing estates – entertained and inspired with his personal anecdotes. To achieve perfection in design, Hemmingway urged marketers: “Spot something that’s wrong and make it right.”

  1. Customer insight

At dotmailer, we know our customers are true superstars, so it was awesome to see Charlotte Hilton from Sika take the stage to show audiences how they’ve harness automation to build trust in B2B marketing. Alongside Charlotte, attendees were able to hear success stories from Tom Wheatley of Shortlist Media and Sarah Elphick of Forest Holidays – to name a few! See the agenda for a full list of dotmailer superstars who lent their expertise on the day.

  1. Our partners in tech

From our superb Gold partners, Magento and Shopify plus, who helped realise the Summit 2018, to the inspiring session on trust and social proof from Neil Bayton at Trustpilot, attendees were able to access expertise from a seriously eclectic mix of tech experts. See the full list of partners for 2018.

 

Don’t believe the hype? Check out some videos from the day.

See you next year!

The post Top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Smile.io reward programs launches new app integration with dotmailer

We’re excited to announce our integration with Smile.io, the platform that rewards customers for completing profitable actions. With a merchant base of 15,000 across the globe, Smile allows brands to create powerful, white-labeled, point-based programs that substantially increase customer retention and sales. These drive results by increasing customer purchase frequency and lifetime value, and by lowering customer acquisition costs.

Through the Smile app, rewards can be seamlessly aggregated into email campaigns to boost customer engagement. The first step is to sync your dotmailer address book. Members with existing Smile accounts will then be populated, enabling you to start sending personalized reward emails. Some of the data fields that can be used to customize emails include:

  1. Smile Points Balance
  2. Smile Referral URLs
  3. Smile VIP Tier IDs
  4. Smile VIP Tier Names

Best practices to run a reward program 

Segmentation

Using the aforementioned data fields, you can form targeted send groups according to highest VIP level and offer deep discounts to your prized customers. Conversely, you could create a hyper-customized email geared towards members with low smile points balance by showcasing a number of incentives they are missing out on. With Smile and dotmailer, you choose what perimeters to use – and you can be as creative as you like. 

Personalization 

Sending highly relevant messages tie into the practice of segmentation very closely. While you’re not grouping your contacts by any particular data set, you’re using that information to connect with your customers on a one-to-one level. You can customize your referral link and messaging when members refer their friends and family to your store. For example: “Matt, your referral link expires soon! Don’t miss out on your chance to receive a $25 gift card.” By addressing members by their name, or any other attribute, you’re in with a much better chance of standing out in their crowded inbox.

Additional tips…

Exclusive offers to VIP Tiers 

VIP tiers are an important aspect of effective reward programs; they are the defining strata for motivating customers to elevate their status. A special invite for events, new product launches or promotions for “gold” and “silver” levels is a nice reminder to customers of your program’s benefits, and acts as a hook to keep them coming back for more.

Refer-a-friend campaigns 

Sometimes a small reminder to your customers about the benefits of referring is all it takes to reactivate them. Send an email with their referral URL by simply building a “Has referral URL” customer list – and get them going.

Points balance reminders

The long-established points balance email notification is the mainstay of all reward program communications. You have to keep customers in the know about where they stand, how many points they’re away from next-level status, and remind them of the types of redemption available to them in order to keep them engaged. As routine as these emails may be, they weigh heavily on keeping your participants active in your programs.

To find out more about adding a Smile integration, get in touch with your account manager.

The post Smile.io reward programs launches new app integration with dotmailer appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

dotmailer receives ‘Great User Experience’ title for email marketing software – from reputable business software directory

Leading business software directory FinancesOnline believes businesses and organizations can highly benefit from an email automation marketing platform that is both feature-rich and easy to use. FinancesOnline’s experts found this in dotmailer, thus they gave us a positive 8.8 score and bestowed to us their prestigious Great User Experience and Rising Star awards.

 

The Great User Experience and Rising Star recognition for online email marketing software is given to systems that have satisfied clients with well-designed functionalities alongside a user-friendly and intuitive interface. This can be attributed to dotmailer’s unique drag-and-drop template builder that allow users to effortlessly create impressive email templates within a few minutes. It was also one of the reasons why our solution was recommended in the platform’s ‘what is email marketing software’ guide.

 

FinancesOnline believes dotmailer’s throng of functionalities enables users to remain “on top of every single phase of their email marketing campaigns and other related activities.” Aside from easily creating emails, FinancesOnline said our software can help users “fully optimize their email marketing strategies and get the best results” through various services including, but not limited to, campaign management, creative studio and strategic services. With these, users can significantly boost click-through rates and grow their business.

 

Businesses are also safeguarded with dotmailer’s scalability and custom-built integrations. “As your business needs develop and become more demanding and diverse, dotmailer is more than capable of growing with your enterprise,” wrote FinancesOnline’s experts.

The post dotmailer receives ‘Great User Experience’ title for email marketing software – from reputable business software directory appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com