Harry Hall and email automation: realizing the value of a collaborative implementation

One brand that recognized this was Harry Hall, the renowned equestrian retailer and dotmailer client, who took steps to implement its first email automations with us. These included a welcome series, post-purchase program and a sequence of birthday emails.

As a serious marketer, email automation is your must-have tool to generate more engagement and revenue. It’s quick and simple to get started and you can easily scale your programs once you’ve got to grips with your first few. After the right amount of scoping, and once your first automations have gone live, you’ll start collecting valuable data and the revenue will begin trickling in.

Harry Hall’s story:

Harry Hall is admired by customers for its quality British clothing; every piece is skilfully tailored and further enriched by the brand’s strong heritage. From humble beginnings in the 1870s, Harry Hall has established itself as a prestigious brand in the equestrian world, its products renowned for their durability, practicality and comfort. The brand continues to live up to its original trading slogan: “Hall marked clothes are the best”. To achieve the same level of excellence in its email marketing, Harry Hall’s long-term focus is to create a seamless customer journey that effectively conveys the brand’s rich heritage and trumpets its high level of service.

Challenges:

With a manageable database at the time, Harry Hall was in a prime position to implement dotmailer and learn about its features; the objective was to grow the database and build out the customer journey throughout the year. However, a business decision left the brand with more data than it bargained for and – to get a handle on the new platform and streamline its email marketing – was in urgent need of a robust data-driven strategy.

Overcoming this challenge wasn’t going to be easy, so the brand sought strategic advice from Camilla Nightingale, director of Holbrook Digital Consultancy. Together they collaborated in scoping out the digital and data prerequisites for implementing an effective portfolio of email automation programs. Next came the implementation phase, which required guidance from the brand’s dotmailer Account Manager and Digital Program Manager.

Goals & Objectives:

The long-term goals for Harry Hall were clear from the very beginning: underline brand quality, demonstrate excellent customer service and showcase stylish and reliable products. Fundamentally, the brand had to tap into its higher life-time-value (LTV) clusters, nurture them at various stages of the cycle, and improve their customer experience. The ultimate objective was to generate more revenue and increase email ROI.

Camilla helped Harry Hall analyze its historical data to identify different clusters and their potential value. Her input was pivotal for the success of the project, steering the brand in the right direction in terms of business objectives and revenue prioritization.

Since day one, the Harry Hall team implemented Google Analytics to monitor the performance of automations and user response to incentives, as well as identify any uplifts in email metrics.

Collaborative automation build:

dotmailer’s ‘collaborative automation build’ session is a co-operative workshop – an interface between training and service – where specialists scope and build automation programs with clients. Although the session had capacity for three automation scopes, Harry Hall preferred to use the 10 hours allocated to the project to build and test programs collaboratively. In the long term, this resulted in more automations being built by Harry Hall as its staff were more confident in creating and testing new programs.

Sami Dabek – eCommerce Manager at Harry Hall – facilitated the project, making sure the various stakeholders had the right assets and technical resources in place to meet the tight deadlines. Sami was keen to learn how to design and test new flows, so she could take Harry Hall’s automations to the next level. Since the go-live date two weeks ago, she’d already independently deployed two new programs – a fantastic achievement.

Sami Dabek, eCommerce Manager at Harry Hall:

I found the collaborative approach was a great fit with our business needs. By working closely with our Project Manager and discussing the set-up of programs at each stage, I felt confident that after the project finished I had the knowledge to maintain these programs, and more importantly, create new ones!

The results:

Through close work with their Digital Program Manager & Account Manager, the Harry Hall team has gained a deeper understanding of the dotmailer platform; this has allowed team members to build and test programs confidently, efficiently and with ease.

Building up their portfolio of programs resulted in an increase in subscriber engagement for Harry Hall; contacts were filtered into relevant programs based on their data, meaning communications were personalized and contextual. The brand was pleased with the programs as they facilitated a memorable journey for customers from beginning to end.

Throughout the customer journey, the team reported a noticeable increase in ROI – a well-deserved result for Harry Hall. This uplift was indicative of the long-term gains from nurture programs (such as welcome and post-purchase), as well as short-term wins from implementing abandoned carts.

Being able to scale the knowledge curve so quickly and reap the rewards of automation has been a tremendous achievement for Harry Hall. The brand’s gone from zero to 100 in such a short amount of time and cites the collaborative session as the secret to its automation success.

What’s next?

Harry Hall has a great roadmap ahead and will continue refining current flows to improve performance over time. Build, measure, learn and repeat

 

Get started today!

The program builder is available in every dotmailer account and it’s super-easy to use. Here’s a link to our automation videos to show you how to get started.

 

Need inspiration?

Check out this case study to learn how Minor Entertainment Ltd. has automated many everyday tasks to increase efficiency and revenues.

Get your free copy of our ‘Making time to save time’ guide which’ll put you on the right path to successful marketing automation.

 

  • This blog was co-written by Marius D’Souza and Pamela Zoni, Account Manager and Digital Marketing Specialist at dotmailer.

The post Harry Hall and email automation: realizing the value of a collaborative implementation appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 5 hours ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience

As marketers, we want to influence our customers and clients to follow the path to conversion. But this can be a challenge for all of us – this is where Nathalie Nahai, the web psychologist, can help. She teaches global audiences about the link between behavioral sciences and the digital space, helping you build a better understanding of how to persuade your audience to take the desired path.

We were so impressed with Nathalie that we invited her to speak at this year’s dotmailer Summit where she’ll be bringing together the latest insights from the world of psychology, neuroscience and behavioral economics to explain the underlying dynamics and motivations behind consumer behavior.

In this blog we posed Nathalie a series of questions – read on to find out some secret hacks, interesting facts and a brief insight into what you’ll be taking away from the dotmailer Summit.

Get your ticket today because this is the one event you don’t want to miss.

Can you tell us a little more about yourself and how you found yourself drawn to web psychology – from what we’ve seen you have a really fascinating background, so it’ll be interesting to see who or what inspired you on your journey?

“Thank you, it’s been a rather unpredictable trajectory!”

“Having studied psychology at university, upon leaving I went straight to Central St Martins to explore fine art, something I have always had a passion for. During my time at CSM I’d been recording music on the side, and I thought it would come in handy to know how to develop websites to help promote myself. So, I went to some classes and as I progressed I ended up taking on freelance work.”

“I began thinking about joining a design agency, when a good friend of mine (who was just leaving agency life for something more entrepreneurial) suggested I hold off for a bit and explore some co-working spaces instead. I found a lovely place to work from where the organiser asked me to run some psychology-related workshops, and the penny started to drop. If psychology could shed light on the factors that influence our behaviours in the physical world, surely it could provide some insight into what shapes our decisions online, too.”

“I looked for books and postgraduate courses on the subject, but at the time I couldn’t find any resources that combined research from the fields of psychology, computer science, human-computer-interaction, marketing, ethics, cross-cultural studies, behavioural economics and UX (the latter two subjects having not yet hit the mainstream). Frustrated by the lack of an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach, I decided to write a book that would allow me to draw these threads together into something I would personally find useful to read, and after a couple of years of trawling through countless studies, Webs Of Influence was conceived – and that’s where it all started.”

What do you think the key messages are in what you do? And how to do you think you help to empower people?

“There are a few key messages in what I do… Firstly, we’re not rational agents and our decision-making is open to influence, both on- and off-line. Secondly, to understand and connect with people in a meaningful way, we have to understand their psychological context, which includes universal, cultural and individual differences. Thirdly – and this is the most important – we have an ethical responsibility to use these insights to create mutually beneficial experiences, which means being transparent (not using dark patterns), delivering on what we promise (providing real value), creating a great customer experience (building trust over time), and respecting people’s privacy (not using covert forms of tracking to follow, coerce or manipulate users into taking certain actions).”

Can you give a small indication into what you will be covering at the dotmailer Summit – perhaps the key takeaways people can expect to leave with?

“People can expect to leave with specific, actionable principles that they can use straight away to create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience that customers will want to come back to experience again.”

There has been a lot of talk recently about how our technology is impacting us and what we can do about it – have you got any key thoughts on this subject? And how you see this influencing our lives and our future?

“Yes I have a several thoughts on this! I think that the most important and pressing issue in this debate is having a space (or spaces) in which we can share, discuss and learn about what’s at stake, and what our choices might be for shaping the world in which we want to live.”

“We’re starting to see a greater interest in how technology can be designed and used to influence and manipulate behaviours, questions which, in my opinion, go to the heart of what it means to be human. Personally, I want to live in a society in which the individual is sovereign – we would own our own data by default and be able to choose with whom to share it, and we would be free from surveillance outside of public spaces – whether physically (via cameras and microphones in the home, or through biometric sensors which are fast becoming reality), or virtually (through the content we share and the activities we engage in online).”

What’s your favorite social medium to engage in?

“It used to be Twitter, but it feels as though it’s become so noisy that I now tend to engage more with Instagram, which I use to connect with a smaller, closer community.”

Any tips or hacks on what obvious mistakes sites make that discourage customers from buying?

“Yes – in a bid to stay on top of design trends, brands will often create websites, content and apps that look great but actually deflect attention away from the all-important call to action. A great example here is when brands use auto-playing videos on their websites – the motion will detract attention away from the CTA and will often lower conversion rates as a result. If you have to use video, reduce the amount of background motion that’s involved, so that users have the chance to locate and understand the call to action.”

Have you come across any interesting facts about global user behavior that you could share with us?

“Yes – high load times frustrate users no matter where they’re from! More seriously though, one of the most important factors that will impact the success of a business, is trust. If you can provide customers with something they value in a way that is frictionless and even joyful, not only will they be more likely to return to use your service and recommend you to their peers, they will also be more forgiving when you make mistakes – which in the amplified world of social media, can go a long way to protecting your reputation.”

And lastly has there been anything that has truly inspired you lately?

“Yes, although it’s on a completely different note! I’ve been studying academic drawing at Barcelona Academy of Art, and I’m finding the whole process extraordinary (if you want to check out some of my work you can find it here on Instagram).”

 

Thank you so much Nathalie for sharing some insights into web psychology, as well as some general inspiration. We’re looking forward to welcoming you on stage on the 19th April at the dotmailer Summit 2018.

You can find out more about the dotmailer Summit here, and for more consumer behavior insights, check out our email psychology whitepaper.

The post Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 days ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Let us take the reins: campaign management hours

“If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change” – Wayne Dyer

Email has changed the way we communicate – it empowers us as marketeers to give consumers exactly what they want and when they want it. What’s more, it continues to be the most powerful revenue-generating channel for brands to reach their customers; for every $1 spent on email, $32 are returned.

With more choice comes greater competition in the inbox, and – for email to stay relevant – innovation and transformation are both key. Today, consumers expect brand messages to be contextual, relevant to both their preferences and activity. And, to effectively achieve this seamless journey, it’s essential that you pair the right data with the right messages.

So, why not let our Digital Marketing Specialists provide a fresh perspective on your email marketing strategy? Whether you want to deliver a high-value showstopper, or just looking for interim support on the everyday stuff, we’re in the best position to step in and provide specialist support for great ROI.

Let us work alongside you to:

  1. Streamline your processes
  • We can take the pressure off by managing your daily sends in a convenient way, providing briefs and calendar templates alongside any amends you may require.
  • Let us look at what you’re currently doing and advise on whether we think something could be improved or implemented in a better way.
  1. Offer best practice
  • Are you optimizing your emails with dotmailer’s features? Let us check.
  • Our specialist team can guide you on content*, layout and design to make sure you get the very most out of your sends.
  1. Check your templates
  • Are your templates mobile-optimized? Let us do the hard work and test your templates across all major email clients to ensure your emails have the very best visibility.
  1. Experience our partners
  • We have an incredible range of partners coming up with new ideas and exciting concepts that can transform your email campaigns and enhance their performance; from rich and inspirational content to engagement generation tactics. Whether it be a countdown timer or pulling in a real-time weather forecast into an email, we’ve got you covered.

How do you stack up against other brands in their email marketing? Check out our Hitting the Mark benchmark report – a free download featuring the hottest insights into the email marketing strategy of 100 UK and US brands.

*Please speak to your Account Manager for more information on copywriting services and campaign management hours.

The post Let us take the reins: campaign management hours appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 week ago from blog.dotmailer.com

The 2018 Local SEO Forecast: 9 Predictions According to Mozzers

Posted by MiriamEllis

It’s February, and we’ve all dipped our toes into the shallow end of the 2018 pool. Today, let’s dive into the deeper waters of the year ahead, with local search marketing predictions from Moz’s Local SEO Subject Matter Expert, our Marketing Scientist, and our SEO & Content Architect. Miriam Ellis, Dr. Peter J. Myers, and Britney Muller weigh in on what your brand should prepare for in the coming months in local.


WOMM, core SEO knowledge, and advice for brands both large and small

Miriam Ellis, Moz Associate & Local SEO SME

LSAs will highlight the value of Google-independence

Word-of-mouth marketing (WOMM) and loyalty initiatives will become increasingly critical to service area business whose results are disrupted by Google’s Local Service Ads. SABs aren’t going to love having to “rent back” their customers from Google, so Google-independent lead channels will have enhanced value. That being said, the first small case study I’ve seen indicates that LSAs may be a winner over traditional Adwords in terms of cost and conversions.

Content will be the omni-channel answer

Content will grow in value, as it is the answer to everything coming our way: voice search, Google Posts, Google Questions & Answers, owner responses, and every stage of the sales funnel. Because of this, agencies which have formerly thought of themselves as strictly local SEO consultants will need to master the fundamentals of organic keyword research and link building, as well as structured data, to offer expert-level advice in the omni-channel environment. Increasingly, clients will need to become “the answer” to queries… and that answer will predominantly reside in content dev.

Retail may downsize but must remain physical

Retail is being turned on its head, with Amazon becoming the “everything store” and the triumphant return of old-school home delivery. Large brands failing to see profits in this new environment will increasingly downsize to the showroom scenario, significantly cutting costs, while also possibly growing sales as personally assisted consumers are dissuaded from store-and-cart abandonment, and upsold on tie-ins. Whether this will be an ultimate solution for shaky brands, I can’t say, but it matters to the local SEO industry because showrooms are, at least, physical locations and therefore eligible for all of the goodies of our traditional campaigns.

SMBs will hold the quality high card

For smaller local brands, emphasis on quality will be the most critical factor. Go for the customers who care about specific attributes (e.g. being truly local, made in the USA, handcrafted, luxury, green, superior value, etc.). Evaluating and perfecting every point of contact with the customer (from how phone calls are assisted, to how online local business data is managed, to who asks for and responds to reviews) matters tremendously. This past year, I’ve watched a taxi driver launch a delivery business on the side, grow to the point where he quit driving a cab, hire additional drivers, and rack up a profusion of 5-star, unbelievably positive reviews, all because his style of customer service is memorably awesome. Small local brands will have the nimbleness and hometown know-how to succeed when quality is what is being sold.


In-pack ads, in-SERP features, and direct-to-website traffic

Dr. Peter J. Meyers, Marketing Scientist at Moz

In-pack ads to increase

Google will get more aggressive about direct local advertising, and in-pack ads will expand. In 2018, I expect local pack ads will not only appear on more queries but will make the leap to desktop SERPs and possibly Google Home.

In-SERP features to grow

Targeted, local SERP features will also expand. Local Service Ads rolled out to more services and cities in 2017, and Google isn’t going to stop there. They’ve shown a clear willingness to create specialized content for both organic and local. For example, 2017 saw Google launch a custom travel portal and jobs portal on the “organic” side, and this trend is accelerating.

Direct-to-website traffic to decline

The push to keep local search traffic in Google properties (i.e. Maps) will continue. Over the past couple of years, we’ve seen local packs go from results that link directly to websites, to having a separate “Website” link to local sites being buried 1–2 layers deep. In some cases, local sites are being almost completely supplanted by local Knowledge Panels, some of which (hotels being a good example) have incredibly rich feature sets. Google wants to deliver local data directly on Google, and direct traffic to local sites from search will continue to decline.


Real-world data and the importance of Google

Britney Muller, SEO & Content Architect at Moz

Relevance drawn from the real world

Real-world data! Google will leverage device and credit card data to get more accurate information on things like foot traffic, current gas prices, repeat customers, length of visits, gender-neutral bathrooms, type of customers, etc. As the most accurate source of business information to date, why wouldn’t they?

Google as one-stop shop

SERPs and Maps (assisted by local business listings) will continue to grow as a one-stop-shop for local business information. Small business websites will still be important, but are more likely to serve as a data source as opposed to the only place to get their business information, in addition to more in-depth data like the above.


Google as friend or foe? Looking at these expert predictions, that’s a question local businesses of all sizes will need to continue to ask in 2018. Perhaps the best answer is “neither.” Google represents opportunity for brands that know how to play the game well. Companies that put the consumer first are likely to stand strong, no matter how the nuances of digital marketing shift, and education will remain the key to mastery in the year ahead.

What do you think? Any hunches about the year ahead? Let us know in the comments.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 1 week ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Christmas didn’t quite work out? Well maybe Valentine’s Day then.

Valentine’s Day is on the 14th of February. Now this should not come as too much of a surprise – it is the 14th of February every year. Yet, it sneaks up on us each and every year. We get past the fraught Christmas period and think we can relax and then Valentine’s Day seemingly comes out of nowhere. I am not talking about the the blokes that get surprised by Valentine’s Day, but rather, I am talking about the ecommerce companies that seemingly get caught out by it as well.

At the 2017 dotmailer Summit in March, we launched the Hitting the Mark Report (HTM) where we reviewed 100 UK and US ecommerce brands. We thought we would go back and review how those brands handled the 2017 Black Friday period to see if anything had changed and if not, what advice we could give for the upcoming holiday season of Valentine’s Day, Mothering Sunday, Easter, Father’s Day and Graduation Season for our friends in the US.

Sixty percent (60%) of the brands in the full HTM did not have abandoned cart programs in place and surprisingly this number grew to 66% over the Black Friday period (the Monday before through to Cyber Monday). This increase is more likely down to brand concerns about stock and their ecommerce tech rather than a general move away from abandoned cart programs. While there is nothing worse than delivering a bad customer experience, failing to send cart recovery emails is simply leaving money on the table. With 69% of carts being abandoned globally (Baymard Institute 2017), you don’t have to reclaim many of them to make money.

Another surprising thing in our Black Friday Hitting the Mark was that 44% of the brands in the study did not push their Black Friday offers via email. This flies in the face of conventional wisdom when you consider that email is still the most popular channel for consumers when maintaining a relationship with a brand and email consistently delivers the highest ROI; the DMA reports that marketers get a return of over £32 for every pound spent.

On the other hand, these brands may have had the right idea and actually stood out because of their absence. Over the course of that week we received an average of 18 emails per day that teased us with promotional items and potential deals on offer early on and then closed out the week by adding urgency with countdown timers.

To me, this data all points to one thing: marketers falling into the Black Friday trap of focussing on the sale and forgetting that this transaction is part of a long-term relationship. So, what should we be doing in the coming weeks and months to make sure we get these important holiday sales but also maintain and build relationships to get further sales throughout the year?

1. Don’t just sell, add value

You want to promote your products but often this is more achievable not by giving an offer but by using your marketing to enhance your customer service. One of the easiest ways to do this is by providing gift inspiration. Generally, people know they have to get a gift but will have absolutely no idea what to get. What they need is a little inspiration and reassurance. Of course, you can also add value to your customer service by reminding people about the last day to purchase to get things delivered on time, order confirmations and shipping notifications.

I have also recently heard about an email program for people who have procrastinated just a bit too long and missed the all-important date. It was an ecommerce company that would (for an extra fee) send an apology email or even include an apology letter in the package for “their delayed shipping.” They were essentially willing to take the hit for someone who had ordered too late.

2. Recognize that it may not be a special day for everybody

I was recently taking a train to an event and overheard a conversation where a woman was telling her friend about a recent breakup. It was clear that her emotions were still quite raw as she lamented about Valentine’s Day being right around the corner. This got me thinking that a lot of these upcoming holidays may not be relevant for a lot of reasons and our marketing messages may be more than just an annoyance, they could hurt too.

Of course, it would be impossible to know this. It is like bumping into an acquaintance and asking about their parents only to find that one had passed away. You had no way of knowing, but you feel bad anyway.  As part of your preference center let people take a break from your emails. You do not need to know why, and they probably would not say, but they will remember you for providing this little courtesy.

3. Reduce the cadence once they have bought

One of the trends we saw in the full Hitting the Mark report which ran over a period of six months was that even though we had filled in every field on every form, answered all of their questions, thoroughly browsed their websites, and went on to purchase something; many of the brands failed to recognize any of that behavior.

Their emails consisted of a new offer with each new message. Many even went so far as to send us an offer for a product we had already purchased. Most people only need one gift for each of these holidays, once you have bought that Valentine’s Day, Mothering Sunday or Father’s Day gift, how likely are you to need another one? One of the easiest ways to ‘recognize’ a recipient is to know whether they have purchased recently and change your mailing cadence accordingly.

4. Don’t add new customers to your business-as-usual comms right away

Similarly, we have found that many retailers refuse to recognize new customers and treat them differently. Your new customers have found your site, registered, browsed and purchased. How likely are they to need to purchase again right away? That however is too often ignored and new customers are immediately put into the full-on marketing comms program (which as we saw above is usually based around buy, Buy, BUY). Think about easing your new customers into your program by starting with your value-added content, increasing the offer cadence over time.

5. Start working on your abandoned cart program

Let’s face it. If you haven’t started yet, you are unlikely to have your abandoned cart program up and running by Valentine’s Day, so this is a longer-term recommendation. Start working on your abandon cart program as soon as possible. One dotmailer client was able to cover the entire cost of setting up their abandoned cart with the very first recovery email they sent out. In another example, a medium fashion retailer working with dotmailer successfully recovered over £50k per month with its abandoned cart program. The success stories are countless…

Gone are the days of the big Christmas Shopping Season, when just over two months’ trading determined if we had a good year or not. As marketers and retailers, we have been really good at creating the next big gift-giving occasion and these seem to get bigger, better and more frequent every year. The brands that really succeed however do not rely on this constant stream of ‘important’ days. The successful brands build strong, long-lasting customer relationships by using the data they have to deliver relevant emails, which are regarded by subscribers as useful, one-to-one comms rather than generic marketing.

To learn more about seasonal email marketing trends, download our Black Friday Hitting the Mark report below:

The post Christmas didn’t quite work out? Well maybe Valentine’s Day then. appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

How to create content to support local SEO and rock the rankings

Are you looking for ways to increase your organic visibility and rankings in local search results?  Contributor Kristopher Jones shares how to shine in local search results using locally focused content.

The post How to create content to support local SEO and rock the rankings appeared first on…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Why should I implement user tracking software?

Now more than ever, brands need to be data-driven and offer a highly personalized experience. To get noticed in the inbox – over and above everybody else – it’s important to send timely, contextual emails that are meaningful to subscribers.

This is where user tracking software comes in; unlocking the power of web insight enables you to enhance the relevancy of your email campaigns. dotmailer’s web insight tool tracks the website behaviour of customers and prospects after they’ve clicked through from your emails. It gathers rich behavioural insights from your site visitors:

  • Duration of a user’s visit
  • Pages viewed
  • Point of drop out

This enriched data helps you quantify the impact of your campaigns, identify highly engaged subscribers and follow up with timely, appropriate content.

There are two key ways that our web behavioural tool can give your email marketing results a dramatic lift:

  1. Building segments that target individuals based on their web activity; for instance, those who’ve viewed pages which indicate a strong intent to buy or enquire.
  2. Powering your automations; i.e. a browse abandonment program that prompts the completion of a form or a cart recovery program that encourages the placement of an order.

Forest Holidays has recently enabled the dotmailer web behaviour tool to great effect. At present, user tracking is being leveraged to target individuals who’ve abandoned their basket by sending them a personalized, well-timed email. The results speak for themselves: a significant uplift in engagement and a 5% COS in the first 30 days of implementation.

If you’d like to know more about dotmailer’s web insight tool, contact your Account Manager, or take a free trial of our platform.

The post Why should I implement user tracking software? appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

SSL for custom domains

That means over 10,000 of your domains are now secured with SSL – immediately, without any setup or cost to you.

Think of it as a late Christmas present that you didn’t know you wanted. It may not be shiny and full of novelty, but it’s practical and useful. Like a shed. Who wouldn’t be delighted receiving a shed for Christmas?

Previously in dotmailer you had a choice between either a secure dotmailer branded domain or an unsecured domain of your own. With this update, we are closing the loop on data security and leading the way on best practice. Your contacts get both the brand recognition of your own domain and the security benefits of SSL.

Google says no to non-SSL

The change to SSL everywhere matters. People are increasingly aware of the ‘padlock’ icon in their browser, to the extent that it is expected any time someone is asked to submit their data to a website. Google agrees and recently blogged about their proposed changes to how Chrome will flag non-SSL websites in the future.

SSL domains in dotmailer

This dotmailer update affects all uses of your custom domains and sub-domains, such that they can now be secure wherever you use them. That means: email links, unsubscribe pages, ‘forward to a friend’ pages, landing pages, surveys, signup forms, preference centers, etc.

If you’ve not yet purchased a custom domain, you can do so now by contacting your Account Manager.

And if you’d like to find out more about the dotmailer platform, start your 14-day free trial here.

The post SSL for custom domains appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com