How to tap into the consumer’s psyche with your email marketing campaigns

You don’t need to have studied psychology or consumer behavior to know that human beings have both an emotive and rational side. Our process is essentially reactive, then proactive. We eat with our eyes, don’t we?

In an interesting article by Nielson Norman Group, Kahneman describes two specific ‘modes’ in which people process information – System 1 is our involuntary and automatic self, whereas System 2 is our attentive and analytical self. By default, the former is fast and effortless, whereas the latter is “slow and effortful”.

This psychology can easily be applied to email marketing, as our response to a campaign (i.e. open, click, purchase) is indicative of many factors: first our brain will register emotionally and then rationally; this occurs without us even registering. Therefore, as marketers it’s important to get the look and feel of an email just right, along with delivering content that’s super-relevant to the recipient. These elements are the make-up of a successful campaign that encourages the user or customer to take the desired action.

Putting this knowledge into practice requires a careful balancing act; as email marketers, we’ll often major on trying to capture our audience’s emotions, but this comes at a price if we forget to cater to their rational side.

3 tricks on how to seduce the consumer’s emotional side

Beautiful email design – sexy creative will tap into System 1 – and builds a strong foundation for System 2. A well-design email trumpets brand credibility and strengthens trust amongst subscribers. According to the Nielson Group, UX design (be that a website, email, social etc.) determines the credibility of a brand in 50 milliseconds. Similarly, the attention span of so-called ‘digital surfers’ – those that adopt a multi-channel browsing approach – is around 8 seconds. It’s therefore important that your email is polished and concise, while being 100% on-brand. If you’re wondering how you can go about optimizing your brand’s email design, we’ve got a free cheatsheet which’ll send you in the right direction.

Stunning images and a powerful call-to-action (CTA) – for a positive action to occur, imagery and CTAs must be eye-catching. Although images are said to speak a thousand words, it’s key that they complement your copy to signpost the reader and aid scannability. If you get the former right, you’ll set things up nicely for the all-important CTA. The CTA needs to be well-positioned, inviting, and not alarming. Nielson details the positive and negative outcomes of CTAs, depending on how our System 1 interprets them. For instance, avoid fierce, ‘in-your-face’ CTAs in favor of subtle yet influential ones. Too many variations, colors and options can cause disorientation, negative impressions and unnecessary delay. Minimal ingredients drive better conversions – so don’t over-complicate it!

Relevant friendly from name and a personalized subject line – personalization will always tap into our emotive side – but remember, getting it wrong can cause upset and belittle the overall message. Ensure that your data is top-notch, your segments are set up correctly, and you’ve tested the personalized elements of your email (such as subject line, pre-header text and dynamic content, etc.). Consistency is also key if you’re trying to build brand trust, so ensure that your friendly from name is recognizable throughout your email communications.

3 tips on how to win the consumer’s rationale

Granular segmentation and targeting – brands should tailor messages to subscribers’ interests to ensure the fluidity between their emotional and rational side – otherwise they’ll fail to engage in future. We ultimately want people’s System 1 to override their System 2 – i.e. the relevancy of the message will avoid scrutinization and suspicion. Segmentation and targeting is therefore your best friend; never forget the mantra of email marketing: the right message, to the right person, at the right time.

Superb content – according to Email Acid, 80% of your audience is scanning – rather than reading – your email. This ties in with the time-sensitive nature of online channels. Your content needs to be on point and you can do this through a combination of personalization: by crafting copy that oozes personality (reflecting your brand’s tone of voice) and good formatting that lets your content breathe. And, if you can make your email relevant to moments in your customers’ lives, you’ll be winning. Check out our cheatsheet on how to nail your copy.

An irresistible offering – to engage with email, there needs to be something worthwhile for the recipient, or else their System 1 will lose momentum and their System 2 will wield rationality. Consequently, it’s necessary for brands to scope the product offering in a way that reflects the needs of consumers and provides them with a solution to their pain points. This could be anything from an anti-wrinkle face cream (I’m in my 50s and anti-ageing cream is one of my preferences), to a whitepaper on healthcare (I’m a senior social researcher), to an undergraduate degree course in History (I’m a prospective History student).

 

As an email marketer, it’s your job to captivate the subscriber, and prolong that captivity for as long as it takes to drive a positive action or conversion – all the while affirming brand loyalty. It’s important to iterate that the success of your email marketing is ultimately up to the psychology of the end recipient and how they process the message you’ve sent them. Although there’s always an element of logic in our response to an email campaign, emotion is – nine times out of ten – at the steering wheel.

For more key takeaways on how to master email psychology, check out our whitepaper.

The post How to tap into the consumer’s psyche with your email marketing campaigns appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

What top ecommerce experts love about Magento 2

While some were intrigued by new tools and improved content structures, others seemed reluctant to join the bandwagon. After all, Magento 2 was a significant departure from the original version. Many weren’t prepared for such a big leap, which is why there are so many ecommerce websites still powered by an older version of this platform.

From today’s perspective, it’s safe to say that Magento 2 managed to push the entire ecommerce industry forward. This is one of the reasons why we wanted to engage the community of Magento experts and learn their opinions on this platform. If you continue reading, you will learn what top ecommerce experts have to say about Magento 2 when we asked them to tell us what they loved about Magento 2.

“More powerful than you think”

Many individuals believe that Magento 2 is overly complicated – at least until they try the platform themselves. Other ecommerce platforms are doing an excellent job of marketing their user-friendly features. As a result, inexperienced online store owners become overwhelmed once they decide to try one of those platforms. Magento seems to be doing the opposite. It appears overly complicated at first, especially since it involves working with highly-trained professionals, however anyone can master Magento 2 with a little bit of effort.

Here is what Ryan Street, a trainer at Magento Commerce, says:

Magento is a robust and complex platform. Many times, I receive questions about ‘Can Magento do this?’ More often than not, I am able to tell clients that Magento has their requested feature right out of the box. This usually comes as quite a surprise to many of them. Magento 2 is more powerful than you think.

“Magento has no competitors in the market”

Only a couple of years ago, there were a few powerful ecommerce platforms. However, the competition grew quickly and now there are currently more than a dozen heavily-marketed platforms battling over each and every online store owner. However, we often forget that Magento is one of the oldest platforms in the market.

The most significant limitation to ecommerce platforms is their flexibility. We believe that Magento is an example of freedom in design and development to other platforms. The truth is that you have unparalleled freedom with Magento 2 as you can design an online store of your own custom design and implement features found nowhere else.

Take a look at this quote from Miguel Balparda who is a senior Magento developer:

In my opinion, Magento has no competitors in the market. Shopify, for example, is a fine platform but it’s not as flexible as Magento. Other platforms are also easy to use, but the flexibility of Magento can’t be compared with any other platform at the moment.

“A Magento 2 website can grow with you”

When choosing between different ecommerce platforms, scalability is one of the most critical factors. This is easy to understand since every online store owner wants to know that their website can easily grow, but you might be surprised to know that scalability is one of the biggest strengths of Magento 2. The newest version of this platform brings dramatically improved performance while reducing server load. At any moment, online store owners can work within their website’s backend without affecting the performance. Powerful design features make this process as effortless as it can be.

Rebecca Brocton, a Magento 2 developer and project manager, recently spoke on this matter:

If you are serious about ecommerce, growing your business, and having a scalable website that can grow with you, then the first choice has always been Magento.

“Issues can be identified and fixed quickly”

Support is of the utmost importance when it comes to any ecommerce platform. Unlike traditional websites, technical difficulties can greatly impact any online store. Every second an online shop displays an error or becomes inaccessible means losing a potential customer, but this can be avoided by having a reliable support team or a dedicated community of users.

As you surely know, Magento 2 is drastically different from the original version. This change didn’t happen overnight. Instead, many developers all around the world have had prepared for this step. Today, there are armies of highly-skilled develops that can help you resolve technical issues in no time.

This is what Sean Breeden, a certified Magento developer, says:

So much effort has gone into the development of Magento 2 that I do recommend it for store owners. Magento 2 has a much larger community than Magento 1 in the beginning, which means that many of the problems that are encountered will be identified and fixed quickly.

“Great built-in functionalities of Magento 2”

Even though other ecommerce platforms can be a fantastic solution for small online stores, Magento is the only platform with incredibly capable functionalities that are built into the system. Different platforms offer premium-priced extensions to make up for this but Magento 2 brings it all at once, right out of the box.

Eugene Zubkov is a senior Magento develop with years of experience under his belt. Here is how he feels about built-in functionalities of Magento 2:

One of the most significant advantages of Magento are numerous helpful built-in functionalities of the platform. After installing the system, we get a fully-functional store with multi-currency, localization, a lot of store views, marketing, and reports.

“New improvements and new functionalities every few months”

Security and implementation of advanced features are what concerns every online store owner. Upgrading to Magento 2 is a complex process that takes meticulous planning and execution. However, this is also a vital and rewarding process. One of the most important reasons to make this leap is the constant and rapid development of this platform. After upgrading to Magento 2, you can be sure that you have access to the latest security patches and newly introduced features. Luckily, upgrading to a new incremental update within Magento 2 is as easy as it gets.

Check out what Nestor Gonzales, a developer with 12+ years of experience, says about applying updates within Magento 2:

The main selling point of Magento 2 is that it’s easy to upgrade because the upgrades are extremely simple with the new releases every quarter. It’s going to be like a new store with improvements and new functionalities every few months.

“Sheer amount of customization possibilities”

Online shoppers don’t care about the technology that is powering ecommerce websites. Instead, they are focused on visual design and user-oriented features. Magento 2 is diverse as it gets when it comes to visual design as this platform thrives on customization.

You will hardly find two Magento 2-powered online stores that look and work the same way – even if they use the same template. With a bit of effort, inexperienced online store owners can experiment with different layouts without sacrificing functionality and performance. The truth is that Magento 2 can be used to create an optimized website for just about any purpose and business model.

Josh Cameron, who is a Magento developer and consultant, recently stated:

Personally, I think the sheer amount of customization possibilities is a huge factor. Businesses can fine-tune Magento to fit their business model, instead of the other way around.

Final thoughts

There isn’t a better way to learn about an ecommerce platform than to see what experts have to say. You can find thousands of Magento 2 experts in every corner of the world, which is the ultimate proof of this platform’s capabilities. Make sure to use their knowledge and to engage with the vibrant community of Magento developers and users.

 

Uwe Weinkauf is the CEO of MW2 Consulting, experts in Enterprise Application Development, eCommerce, IT Outsourcing, and IT Operations that delivers valuable solutions for global business needs. 

You can learn more about MW2, discover dotmailer’s Magento integration, or follow Uwe on LinkedIn.

The post What top ecommerce experts love about Magento 2 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Repetition, Repetition, Repetition … Repeat Marketing Works

A key objective for your brand should be to extend its reach across the web, as this can generate more quality leads and ultimately increase conversions. What’s more, by broadening your presence online and keeping your brand front of mind, you’re likelier to retain existing customers.

Utilizing the click-through behavior of your email recipients is an effective way of maximizing these multichannel opportunities and can help increase brand recognition. Considering that consumers spend on average 135 minutes on social media per day, as opposed to 20 minutes on email (Statista, 2017), it’s important to factor repeat marketing into your strategy mix.

Here’s how it’s done:

In the dotmailer platform you’re able to segment customers based on their email behavior. By leveraging these engagement metrics at campaign-level, you can deliver a more relevant and tailored sales cycle to consumers across the web.

Things to consider:

  • You’re a car dealership; how do you convert the prospective customer who’s opened and clicked your email about the new-generation car that’s on sale?
  • What can you do to seduce a customer who’s currently in the market for a beauty product? How can you make it irresistible – above and beyond others – to purchase?
  • You’ve not quite got the attention of that IT decision-maker yet, but you know they’re active on social media. How can you leverage this?

Whether you’re the car dealer trying to promote your offers, the beauty stylist whose product is a perfect match for the customer’s skin complexion or the B2B provider whose solution meets all your prospect’s needs – repeat marketing is a tried-and-tested way of increasing revenue.

By using the segment builder in dotmailer to query subscribers’ email opens and clicks you can begin to amplify your brand, encompassing various online channels by pairing paid adverts to their email interactions. To further optimize, dotmailer’s web tracking behavior monitors and records browse history, allowing you to pool subscribers together based on web visits. This additional visibility can make your repeat marketing even more powerful.

Delivering content to your subscribers across online channels will give your campaigns more weight in influencing their behavior and will put your brand in a competitive position. Likewise, cross-channel marketing allows you to push images and videos to your consumers in a subtle, un-intrusive way, which can tap into their psychology. Pair this with email and they’ll be looking out for your messages when scrolling the inbox.

The top social media sites allow you to upload a list of email addresses and then target content to their users, so long as they’ve associated their email address to their account.

Examples:

  • Facebook/Instagram ‘custom audiences’ – you can create an audience from your customer list, match contacts to their corresponding Facebook profiles and target with relevant ads and content
  • Twitter ‘tailored audience’ – you’re able to target users that are within your segmented subscriber list by uploading their email addresses; what’s more, you can use Twitter usernames (@user) to target relevant influencers
  • LinkedIn ‘contact targeting’ – like the above, by uploading the email addresses of your contacts, you can: market to prospects, retain customers and win back lapsed clients through tailored content

At the end of the day, it’s about being creative and recognizing that the consumer is just a human being like me and you. Consumers’ lives are hectic, with an exhaustive flow of information that’s received on a daily basis; therefore, a prompt on any one of the above channels could spring the idea back into their head, bring them back to the email, phone or website and generate a positive action.

 

 

The post Repetition, Repetition, Repetition … Repeat Marketing Works appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

dotdigital completes the acquisition of COMAPI

I am delighted to announce that the dotdigital group, the parent company behind dotmailer, has successfully completed the acquisition of COMAPI, the omnichannel messaging platform. The acquisition is further proof of the continued investment we’re making in the dotmailer platform to maintain its position as a best-in-class marketing automation solution.

Just as email marketing became marketing automation, today’s forward-thinking marketer is increasingly seeking an omnichannel marketing solution. This acquisition enables faster product innovation to better meet the needs of future marketers, extending our proposition to include mobile messaging comprising of SMS, social media channels and live chat tools.

COMAPI is already a successful brand with strong growth and revenues within the CPaaS market and, with dotdigital’s full support, will continue to work directly with its customers, which include Gap, eBay, TSB, British Airways, Carphone Warehouse and Collect Plus. dotmailer and COMAPI already have numerous shared clients which include Superdry, Hayes Recruitment, Daisy Group and betting giant Ladbrokes.

“By adding COMAPI to our business, dotdigital is executing its vision to be an omnichannel marketing automation platform,” said Milan Patel, CEO of dotdigital group.

“COMAPI has built an impressive platform which, integrated with our software, will allow our customers access to the next generation of consumer engagement marketing technology, aiding retention and boosting our competitive advantage in securing new customers. We are pleased to welcome the COMAPI team and look forward to supporting their business plan and introducing their technology to our global customers.”

COMAPI’s Managing Director Paul Putman, who was involved in the deal, commented on how the merger will have a positive impact on the CPaaS market:

“We are all excited by the opportunity the acquisition represents. It enables COMAPI to accelerate its plan and take advantage of the rapid growth in the CPaaS and conversational commerce market. I also believe that with this acquisition, the dotdigital group of companies will be the obvious technology providers of choice to any business or software platform that needs to communicate with consumers over digital, social and mobile channels.”

COMAPI has been supported by various funders which has helped it to develop and grow over the last 16+ years. Technology Venture Partners LLP’s Nick Simmonds commented on how the news marks a successful exit for COMAPI’s previous funders:

“It has been a pleasure working with Paul Putman and the team at COMAPI and we are delighted with the way in which the company has developed into a technology leader in the conversational messaging market space. We wish the company every success for the future.”

We were already excited about the future, and we are even more so with today’s news. Please join me in welcoming the COMAPI team into the dotfamily.

For more information about the omnichannel technology, visit www.comapi.com.

The post dotdigital completes the acquisition of COMAPI appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Geomodified Searches, Localized Results, and How to Track the Right Keywords and Locations for Your Business – Next Level

Posted by jocameron

Welcome to the newest installment of our educational Next Level series! In our last episode, our fearless writer Jo Cameron shared how to uncover low-value content that could hurt your rankings and turn it into something valuable. Today, she’s returned to share how to do effective keyword research and targeting for local queries. Read on and level up!


All around the world, people are searching: X sits at a computer high above the city and searches dreamily for the best beaches in Ko Samui. Y strides down a puddle-drenched street and hastily types good Japanese noodles into an expensive handheld computer. K takes up way too much space and bandwidth on the free wireless network in a chain coffee house, which could be located just about anywhere in the world, and hunts for the best price on a gadgety thing.

As we search, the engines are working hard to churn out relevant results based on what we’re searching, our location, personalized results, and just about anything else that can be jammed into an algorithm about our complex human lives. As a business owner or SEO, you’ll want to be able to identify the best opportunities for your online presence. Even if your business doesn’t have a physical location and you don’t have the pleasure of sweeping leaves off your welcome mat, understanding the local landscape can help you hone in on keywords with more opportunity for your business.

In this Next Level post, we’ll go through the different types of geo-targeted searches, how to track the right keywords and locations for your business in Moz Pro, and how to distribute your physical local business details with Moz Local. If you’d like to follow along with this tutorial, get started with a free 30-day trial of Moz Pro:

Follow along with a free trial

Whether your customer is two streets away or gliding peacefully above us on the International Space Station, you must consider how the intertwining worlds of local and national search impact your online presence.


Geomodified searches vs. geolocated searches

First, so you can confidently stride into your next marketing meeting and effortlessly contribute to a related conversation on Slack, let’s take a quick look at the lingo.

Geomodified searches include the city/neighborhood in the search term itself to target the searcher’s area of interest.

You may have searched some of these examples yourself in a moment of escapism: “beaches in Ko Samui,” “ramen noodles in Seattle,” “solid state drive London,” or “life drawing classes London.”

Geomodified searches state explicit local intent for results related to a particular location. As a marketer or business owner, tracking geomodified keywords gives you insight into how you’re ranking for those searches specifically.

Geolocated searches are searches made while the searcher is physically located in a specific area — generally a city. You may hear the term “location targeting” thrown about, often in the high-roller realm of paid marketing. Rather than looking at keywords that contain certain areas, this type of geotargeting focuses on searches made within an area.

Examples might include: “Japanese noodles,” “Ramen,” “solid state drive,” or “coffee,” searched from the city of Seattle, or the city of London, or the city of Tokyo.

Of course, the above ways of searching and tracking are often intertwined with each other. Our speedy fingers type demands, algorithms buzz, and content providers hit publish and bite their collective nails as analytics charts populate displaying our progress. Smart SEOs will likely have a keyword strategy that accounts for both geomodified and geolocated searches.

Researching local keywords

The more specific your keywords and the location you’re targeting, generally, the less data you’ll find. Check your favorite keyword research tool, like Keyword Explorer, and you’ll see what I’m talking about. In this example, I’m looking at search volume data for “japanese noodles” vs. “japanese noodles london.”

“Japanese noodles”

“Japanese noodles London”

So, do I toss this geomodified keyword? Hold on, buddy — while the Monthly Volume decreases, take a look at that Difficulty score — it increases. It’s an easy search term to dismiss, since the search volume is so low, but what this tells me is that there’s more to the story.

A search for “japanese noodles” is too broad to divine much of the searcher’s intent — do they want to make Japanese noodles? Learn what Japanese noodles are? Find an appetizing image?… and so on and so forth. The term itself doesn’t give us much context to work with.

So, while the search volume may be lower, a search for “japanese noodles london” means so much more — now we have some idea of the searcher’s intent. If your site’s content matches up with the searcher’s intent, and you can beat your competition in the SERPs, you could find that the lower search volume equates to a higher conversion rate, and you could be setting yourself up for a great return on investment.

Digging into hyperlocal niches is a challenge. We’ve got some handy tips for investigating hyperlocal keywords, including using similar but slightly larger regions, digging into auto-suggest to gather keyword ideas, and using the grouping function in Keyword Explorer.

Testing will be your friend here. Build a lovely list, create some content, and then test, analyze, and as the shampoo bottle recommends, rinse and repeat.


Localized ranking signals and results

When search engines impress us all by displaying a gazillion results per point whatever of a second, they aren’t just looking inwards at their index. They’re looking outwards at the searcher, figuring out the ideal pairing of humans and results.

Local rankings factors take into consideration things like proximity between the searcher and the business, consistency of citations, and reviews, to name just a few. These are jumbled together with all the other signals we’re used to, like authority and relevancy. The full and glorious report is available here: https://moz.com/local-search-ranking-factors

I often find myself returning to the local search ranking factors report because there’s just so much to digest. So go ahead bookmark it in a folder called “Local SEO” for easy reference, and delight in how organized you are.

While you may expect a search for “life drawing” to turn up mostly organic results, you can see the Local Pack is elbowing its way in there to serve up classes near me:

And likewise, you may expect a search for “life drawing london” to show only local results, but lookie here: we’ve also got some top organic results that have targeted “life drawing london” and the local results creep ever closer to the top:

From these examples you can see that localized results can have a big impact on your SEO strategy, particularly if you’re competing with Local Pack-heavy results. So let’s go ahead and assemble a good strategy into a format that you can follow for your business.


Tracking what’s right for your business

With your mind brimming with local lingo, let’s take a look at how you can track the right types of keywords and locations for your business using Moz Pro. I’ll also touch on Moz Local for the brick-and-mortar types.

1. Your business is rocking the online world

Quest: Track your target keywords nationally and keep your eye on keywords dominated by SERP features you can’t win, like Local Packs.

Hey there, w-w-w dot Your Great Site dot com! You’re the owner of a sweet, shiny website. You’re a member of the digital revolution, a content creator, a message deliverer, a gadgety thingy provider. Your customers are primarily online. I mean, they exist in real life too, but they are also totally and completely immersed in the online world. (Aren’t we all?)

Start by setting up a brand-new Moz Pro Campaign for your target location.

Select one of each search engine to track for your location. This is what I like to call the full deck:

Another personal favorite is what I call the “Google Special.” Select Google desktop and Google Mobile for two locations. This is especially handy if you want to track two national locations in a single Campaign. Here I’ve gone with the US and Canada:

I like to track Google Mobile along with Google desktop results. Ideally you want to be performing consistently in both. If the results are hugely disparate, you may need to check that your site is mobile friendly.

Pour all your lovely keywords into the Campaign creation wizard. Turn that keyword bucket upside-down and give the bottom a satisfying tap like a drum:

Where have we found all these lovely keywords? Don’t tell me you don’t know!

Head over to Keyword Explorer and enter your website. Yes, friend, that’s right. We can show you the keywords your site is already ranking for:

I’m going to leave you to have some fun with that, but when you’re done frolicking in keywords you’re ranking for, keywords your competitors are ranking for, and keywords your Mum’s blog is ranking for, pop back and we’ll continue on our quest.

Next: Onward to the SERP features!

SERP features are both a blessing and a curse. Yes, you could zip to the top of page 1 if you’re lucky enough to be present in those SERP features, but they’re also a minefield, as they squeeze out the organic results you’ve worked so hard to secure.

Luckily for you, we’ve got the map to this dastardly minefield. Keep your eye out for Local Packs and Local Teasers; these are your main threats.

If you have an online business and you’re seeing too many local-type SERP features, this may be an indication that you’re tracking the wrong keywords. You can also start to identify features that do apply to your business, like Image Packs and Featured Snippets.

When you’re done with your local quest, you can come back and try to own some of these features, just like we explored in a previous Next Level blog post: Hunting Down SERP Features to Understand Intent & Drive Traffic

2. Your business rocks customers in the real world

Quest: Track keywords locally and nationally and hone in on local SERP features + the wonderful world of NAP.

What if you run a cozy little cupcake shop in your cozy little city?

Use the same search engine setup from above, and sprinkle locally tracked keywords into the mix.

If you’re setting up a new Campaign, you can add both national and local keywords like a boss.

You can see I’ve added a mouthwatering selection of keywords in both the National Keywords section and in the Local Keywords field. This is because I want to see if one of my cupcake shop’s landing pages is ranking in Google Desktop, Google Mobile, and Yahoo and Bing, both nationally and locally, in my immediate vicinity of Seattle. Along with gathering comparative national and local ranking data, the other reason to track keywords nationally is so you can see how you’re doing in terms of on-page optimization.

Your path to cupcake domination doesn’t stop there! You’re also going to want to be the big player rocking the Local Pack.

Filter by Local Pack or Local Teaser to see if your site is featured. Keep your eye out for any results marked with a red circle, as these are being dominated by your competitors.

The wonderful world of NAP

As a local business owner, you’ll probably have hours of operation, and maybe even one of those signs that you turn around to indicate whether you’re open or closed. You also have something that blogs and e-commerce sites don’t have: NAP, baby!

As a lingo learner, your lingo learning days are never over, especially in the world of digital marketing (actually, just make that digital anything). NAP is the acronym for business name, address, and phone number. In local SEO you’ll see this term float by more often than a crunchy brown leaf on a cold November morning.

NAP details are your lifeblood: You want people to know them, you want them to be correct, and you want them to be correct everywhere — for the very simple reason that humans and Google will trust you if your data is consistent.

If you manage a single location and decide to go down the manual listing management route, kudos to you, my friend. I’m going to offer some resources to guide you:

3. You manage multiple local businesses with multiple locations

Quest: Bulk-distribute business NAP, fix consistency issues, and stamp out duplicates.

If you are juggling a bunch of locations for your own business, or a client’s, you’ll know that in the world of citation building things can get out of hand pretty gosh-darn quick. Any number of acts can result in your business listing details splitting into multiple fragments, whether you moved locations, inherited a phone number that has an online past, or someone in-house set up your listings incorrectly.

While a single business operating out of a single location may have the choice to manually manage their listing distribution, with every location you add to your list your task becomes exponentially more complex.

Remember earlier, when we talked about those all-important local search ranking factors? The factors that determine local results, like proximity, citation signals, reviews, and so on? Well, now you’ll be really glad you bookmarked that link.

You can do all sorts of things to send appealing local signals to Google. While there isn’t a great deal we can do about proximity right now — people have a tendency to travel where they want to — the foundational act of consistently distributing your NAP details is within your power.

That’s where Moz Local steps in. The main purpose of Moz Local is to help you publish and maintain NAP consistency in bulk.

First, enter your business name and postcode in the free Check Listing tool. Bounce, bounce…

After a few bounces, you’ll get the results:

Moz Local will only manage listings that have been “verified” to prevent spam submissions.

If you’re not seeing what you’d expect in the Check Listing tool, you’ll want to dig up your Google Maps and Facebook Places pages and check them against these requirements on our Help Hub.

When you’re ready to start distributing your business details to our partners, you can select and purchase your listing. You can find out more about purchasing your listing, again on our Help Hub.

Pro Tip: If you have lots of local clients, you’ll probably want to purchase via CSV upload. Follow our documentation to get your CSV all spruced up and formatted correctly.

If tracking your visibility and reputation is high on your to-do list, then you’ll want to look at purchasing your listings at the Professional or Premium level.

We’ll track your local and organic rankings for your Google My Business categories by default, but you can enter your own group of target keywords here. We account for the geographic location of your listings, so be sure to add keywords without any geomodifiers!

If you want to track more keywords, we’ve got you covered. Hop on over to Moz Pro and set up a Campaign like we did in the section above.

4. You’re a dog trainer who services your local area without a storefront

Quest: Help owners of aspiring good dogs find your awesome training skills, even though you don’t have a brick-and-mortar storefront.

At Moz HQ, we love our pooches: they are the sunshine of our lives (as our Instagram feed delightfully confirms). While they’re all good doggos, well-trained pooches have a special place in our hearts.

But back to business. If you train dogs, or run another location-specific business without a shop front, this is called a service-area business (or SAB, another term to add to the new lingo pile).

Start by tracking searches for “dog trainer seattle,” and all the other keywords you discovered in your research, both nationally and locally.

I’ve got my Campaign pulled up, so I’m going to add some keywords and track them nationally and locally.

You may find that some keywords on a national level are just too competitive for your local business. That’s okay! You can refine your list as you go. If you’re happy with your local tracking, then you can remove the nationally tracked keywords from your Campaign and just track your keywords at the local level.

Pro Tip: Remember that if you want to improve your Page Optimization with Moz Pro, you’ll have to have the keyword tracked nationally in your Campaign.

In terms of Moz Local, since accuracy, completeness, and consistency are key factors, the tool pushes your complete address to our partners in order to improve your search ranking. It’s possible to use Moz Local with a service-area business (SAB), but it’s worth noting that some partners do not support hidden addresses. Miriam Ellis describes how Moz Local works with service-area businesses (SABs) in her recent blog post.

Basically, if your business is okay with your address being visible in multiple places, then we can work with your Facebook page, provided it’s showing your address. You won’t achieve a 100% visibility score, but chances are your direct local competitors are in the same boat.


Wrapping up

Whether you’re reaching every corner of the globe with your online presence, or putting cupcakes into the hands of Seattleites, the local SEO landscape has an impact on how your site is represented in search results.

The key is identifying the right opportunities for your business and delivering the most accurate and consistent information to search engines, directories, and your human visitors, too.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from tracking.feedpress.it

3 major popup trends to follow in 2018

Popups are already the best way to collect email addresses. As Head of Customer Success at WisePops, an intelligent popup solution, I see customers convincing as many as 1 visitor out of 5 to subscribe to their newsletter with a simple email popup.

Our average subscription rate is 5.9%. In other words, out of 10,000 visitors seeing a popup, our customers collect on average 590 emails. And if you don’t believe me, there are plenty of case studies on the matter which go in the same direction.

5.9% is good. But are there any new techniques you could use to boost your popups’ performance? The reply is a resounding YES. As most online marketing tools, popups are evolving very quickly. Let’s review the latest developments and how they can help you collect more email subscribers.

Trend #1: popups will be (way) smarter (targeting)

Targeting plays a huge part in the success of an opt-in popup. Some of our customers’ popup A/B tests showed that a simple tweak in the targeting can double the number of emails collected. And in terms of targeting, lots of options have appeared in the past few months.

In recent months we’ve seen a new trend emerging where marketers design different campaigns for each of their categories or topics. Here’s a good ecommerce illustration from SohoHome, an Interior shop. The message perfectly matches the category where it’s displayed, thus driving a higher engagement.

Here’s another example from KlientBoost, a CRO and PPC agency. They create separate campaigns for their most popular blog articles. This campaign is displayed on one page only.

 

Popups are adapting to the context

Marketers are pushing this logic further with contextual targeting. In short, it’s a way to trigger a popup when some custom conditions are met by the page or the user. Popular examples include popups displayed depending on the cart value, popups adapted to the user’s loyalty status, or popups displayed to users who have visited a specific page before.

Here’s one example from Christy Dawn, a fashion retailer. They display a specific popup on out-of-stock products.

As you already guessed, the engagement rate is pretty high.

Trend #2: Popups are mobile

Earlier this year, Google shared new guidelines for mobile popups. Prior to this release, they invited webmasters to stop displaying popups which prevented users from accessing content on a landing page.

Since then, marketers have adapted their popup strategy to this change and mobile popups have never been this efficient and user-friendly.

Nike is leading the game with a popup displayed when a user clicks a call-to-action:

Another good illustration comes from Timberland. See how they shrank their popup’s size?

 

Why do they bother? Because mobile now makes up the majority of Internet traffic. And marketers need to adapt to this new paradigm.

Trend #3: Popups are coming alive

With the rise of video marketing and GIFs, it seems only logical that marketers draw inspiration from this trend and add life to their popups. Why is it so important? Because it contributes to catching your visitor’s attention and boosts your popups’ CTR.

This is how Inkbox adds fun to their opt-in popups:

Here’s another example from Vivadogs, a company offering boxes for dogs. What’s so interesting about it is that:

(1) it makes the message very visible (could you miss it? no!)

(2) it gives a good sense of what customers can expect when they order a box for their pet

(3) it’s more fun than a basic popup

Wrap-up

Popups have been an essential part of marketers’ toolboxes for a few years now. But like any marketing tool, you must renew it to make sure it’s adapted to the changing behavior of your visitors and leads.

As Einstein once said, “the measure of intelligence is the ability to change”. Let’s be more intelligent in 2018 and let’s work hard on our popups!

This partner guest post was written by Greg d’Aboville who’s Head of Customer Success at Wisepops, a tool that helps marketers build intelligent website popups.

The post 3 major popup trends to follow in 2018 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Leverage your brand heritage to power post-purchase automation: how Grenson got it right

For many businesses, heritage and background are what make them a firm favorite in consumers’ hearts. Legacy builds the foundations for brand identity, personality and trust; these qualities are fundamental for retailers in a crowded market. Today, brands need to resonate emotionally with their customers to remain competitive, meaning heritage is a powerful advantage.

For traditional offline retailers such as Grenson, the surge in ecommerce has brought with it a need to establish an online presence that marries perfectly to the in-store customer experience; personalized and relevant communication is key. This is particularly important for brands who are keen to strike the right balance between broadening their email reach and upholding their brand values.

Email marketing automation is the go-to tactic to achieve 1:1 communication between brands and customers, however retailers still aren’t embracing it en masse. According to this year’s Hitting the Mark benchmark report, around 60% of retailers are missing out on the lucrative revenue opportunities that are the bread and butter of email marketing automation.

It’s easy to see why heritage retailers may shy away from increased email frequency, however email marketing shouldn’t be categorised into an aggressive sales tactic. One brand that realized this and has used automation to enhance its customer experience is Grenson.

Grenson’s story

Grenson prides itself in the quality of its shoemaking through astute attention to detail; since 1866 the brand has respected best-of-breed techniques and processes which have ultimately earnt the brand its heritage status. Grenson’s reputation as a champion shoemaker is the overriding message that needs to be relayed through every online channel, with email marketing at the forefront. Therefore, rather than undermine the value of the brand through a sales-heavy tactic, Grenson’s email marketing strategy focuses 100% on brand quality, craftsmanship and customer care.

The road towards customer-first post-purchase automation

Grenson’s objective was to adopt email marketing automation without compromising its well-respected heritage status; this encouraged a conversation with the dotmailer team to talk through the options available to complement its communication strategy.

Having traditionally focused on newsletters, Grenson recognized the benefits of sending triggered messaging off the back of customer behaviors (i.e. an online purchase). According to Epsilon*, the standard ‘batch and blast mentality doesn’t help with relevance’, as it damages long-term engagement and runs the risk of churn. eMarketer* argues that data-driven automation is increasingly being adopted by brands as a consequence.

The RFM model (recency, frequency, monetary) is widely embraced by ecommerce retailers. This segmentation method allows brands to pool customers together based on their purchase behavior and spend, providing the perfect conditions for highly targeted email automation. What’s more, segmenting on this basis helps maximize the relevancy of the message which incentivizes the engagement of recipients. Examples include: ‘thank you for your purchase’, or ‘you’re an all-star customer!’.

In adopting the RFM methodology, it’s important to have the right technology set-up. Grenson takes advantage of the dotmailer and Magento integration; with the syncing of order data, the team can easily segment customers based on recent purchases (excluding in-progress orders and cancellations), and subsequently target the right people with a timely and relevant post-purchase email. With Grenson’s email and ecommerce platform talking to each other, the foundations were in place for its ecommerce team to explore email automation in depth.

Collaborative implementation

Collaborative implementation was the best option for Grenson to kickstart its automation journey. The team initially scoped the project with their dotmailer Account Manager and Digital Program Manager (DPM), during which the data framework, program structure, and campaign body were outlined. Upon completion of the scope the automation was built during a collaborative, face-to-face session, and then quality-tested and activated by dotmailer.

The value of the collaborative session for Grenson was twofold: being trained on how to build an automation program (i.e. understand the logic to build more in the future), and the deliverable of a tried-and-tested automation program, built by experts.

Throughout the project, the Account Manager and DPM provided strategic advice to the Grenson team on how to get the post-purchase approach just right. To avoid giving the impression of upselling, the method had to be soft, product-focused and with the spotlight on brand legacy.

Ashley Hubbard, eCommerce Manager at Grenson:

The automation workshop with dotmailer was a great process … it enabled us to talk to the team about our brand and customer experience desires. The team made sure that they knew our goals and key metrics on this task. At the end of our session, we had a clear plan for implementation.

The results

Sending a ‘thank you’ email after an online purchase is best practice and should emulate the customer service that is experienced in store. Customers also expect this to be the norm, and unsurprisingly are highly likely to engage with post-purchase emails. For instance, Grenson enjoyed an average open rate of 70% from this email program.

Grenson’s ‘thank you’ email

Within the campaign body itself, the customer is invited to learn more about how to look after their new shoes. This brings the focus back to the product itself, rather than pushing for another sale. This customer-care approach drives brand value and loyalty, both important objectives for Grenson.

Being able to build on informative brand stories rather than direct sales messages from an early stage in the customer relationship has been fantastic.

The email’s call-to-action draws the customer to a dotmailer survey to provide feedback on the shopping experience; the results have been great so far, with the response-to-click rate totalling 60%. This is an important aspect of the post-purchase journey for Grenson, as it provides valuable insight into customer satisfaction which can be used to further optimize the UX and service offering.

What’s next?

The focus for Grenson moving forward is to drive more personalized communications, with the aim of bringing the offline experience online. Data enrichment will play a key part in its email marketing strategy.

Having already implemented a welcome program, Grenson has incorporated a preference center to collect subscribers’ shoe sizes. Moving forward the team plans to use this data to segment and target customers – for example, a relevant and well-timed ‘your shoe size is now in stock!’ email can boost conversions significantly.

For more automation inspiration, visit our Customer Success portal or speak to your dotmailer Account Manager.

 

*Email Marketing Benchmarks 2016: Relevancy, Frequency, Deliverability and Mobility. Jillian Ryan, eMarketer | September 6, 2016. Contributors: Lauren Fisher, Corey McNair.

The post Leverage your brand heritage to power post-purchase automation: how Grenson got it right appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Come baccckkk! There are prizes to be won

We’ve all been there. A new job’s on the horizon and all you can think about is how you’re going to squander the extra salary, what you’re going to don on your first day, and whether the new office will be teeming with talent.

It’s only on arrival that the panic starts to set in: new people to win over, a seemingly endless list of things to learn, and a bunch of new systems to get the hang of. If only you could’ve taken your favorite tools and platforms with you…

We have thousands of customers who love using the dotmailer platform (in fact, our NPS score was +10 in September). If you’re one of those people and you’re moving on to pastures new, we’re now offering a win-win incentive if you introduce dotmailer to your new place of work. The business will get a flexible best-of-breed marketing automation platform that’s primed for outstanding results, and you’ll get a system you know and love with the chance to scoop an enviable prize.

The incentive is open to anyone who’s used dotmailer, regardless of whether it was in your current role or a previous position. Don’t worry if you’re not quite ready to resign, because Referrers Win Rewards is a year-long campaign running from now until the end of 2018 and there’ll be prizes up for grabs every quarter.

To find out more about the details of the campaign and how to get in touch, visit our Referrers Win Rewards incentive page.

The post Come baccckkk! There are prizes to be won appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Google updates mobile product knowledge panels to show even more info in one spot

The real estate-heavy panels on mobile encompass multiple product images, more review sources, videos and, of course, Shopping ads.

The post Google updates mobile product knowledge panels to show even more info in one spot appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

SEO in 2018: What’s hot, what’s not?

Voice search. AMP pages. Gap analysis. Algorithm updates. Local SEO. SEO is constantly changing, and what worked well last year may not work at all now. With new technologies and new rules constantly evolving, it’s critical to stay on top of the latest developments. In this webinar, we’ll sit down…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from feeds.searchengineland.com