Go global, think local: delivering human conversations at scale

Well that’s a wrap! What a successful night for the ‘Go Global. Think Local’ seminar held at the Excelsior hotel in Hong Kong back on March 6, 2018. The event was organized by, and fielded presentations from, SmartOSC, Shopify Plus, Lumos and dotmailer – represented by Founder and President Tink Taylor. The event provided a platform for the over 50 attendees present to gain insights and give feedback on what works and what doesn’t when it comes to scaling your business with a customer-first mentality. That is, offering personalized experiences for your customers while still looking to develop cross-border ecommerce.

 

The seminar in Hong Kong included presentations from SmartOSC, Shopify Plus, Lumos and dotmailer

 

Tink Taylor kicked off the presentations, using this opportunity to educate brands on how to create human conversations at scale. It’s no longer effective to assume that all customers will respond to the same content, or that casting a wide net will generate the largest number of leads. To meet the rising expectations of consumers and their demands for a personalized experience, Tink said companies must begin incorporating the use of technology and data into their marketing to create “more natural, more human marketing.”

‘One size fits all’ marketing is becoming rightfully outdated, and although it’s still prevalent today, Tink explained that “times have changed. These one-size-fits-all adverts no longer work”. Consumers provide businesses with an enormous amount of data, but Tink explained that the exchange doesn’t stop there, as “consumers expect brands to speak to them about what they want and on their terms”.

Businesses need to be offering conversations across all channels, with the real value being drawn from “feeding the data from one channel into the others in combination”. This gives the consumer the power to choose how they are contacted and communicated with. Tink commented that if you do this correctly “it will be easy for you to have human conversations at scale”.

 

Tink Taylor, dotmailer Founder and President, addresses delegates in Hong Kong

 

Tink Taylor was followed by Jeff Chen from Lumos, Duong Bui from SmartOSC and Shopify Plus’ Leo Park.

I would like to thank all of those in attendance and dotmailer’s co-hosts; it was a brilliant event to be involved with and there’s no doubt that the information presented will help businesses in their quest to “Go Global. Think Local”.

The post Go global, think local: delivering human conversations at scale appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

The Guide to Local Sponsorship Marketing – The 2018 Edition

Posted by Claudia0428

For most Moz readers, local marketing means content, reviews, AdWords, local listings, and of course citations. If you’re a larger brand, you might be doing outdoor, radio, print, and television advertising as well. Today we’re here to humbly submit that local sponsorships remain the most-overlooked and opportunity-rich channel, and they build real local connections for both large brands and small business alike.

This article is the second edition of the ZipSprout team’s guide to local sponsorships. We wrote the first edition in 2016 after a few months of securing local sponsorship campaigns for a handful of clients. Since then, we’ve tripled our client roster and we’ve worked with more than 8,000 local organizations, donating nearly $1,000,000 in local sponsorships to 1,300+ opportunities. Since then we’ve also learned how to build campaigns for local presence.

So we knew the guide was due for a reboot.

One of our most significant learnings of the past two years is the understanding of local sponsorships as a channel in their own right. They can be directed toward local SEO or local marketing campaigns, but sponsorships are their own breed of local connection — and just like content campaigns, local PR campaigns, or review management, local sponsorships have their own set of conventions and best practices.

This article is meant for anyone with an eye toward local sponsorships as a marketing channel. Agencies and enterprise organizations may find it particularly helpful, but we’re big believers in encouraging smaller local businesses to engage in sponsorships too. Get out there and meet your neighbors!


The what & why of local sponsorships

Local events, nonprofits, and associations constitute a disjointed but very real network of opportunities. Unlike other channels, local sponsorships aren’t accessible from a single platform, but we’ve found that many sponsorships share similarities. This makes it possible to develop processes that work for campaigns in any metro area.

Local sponsorships are also a unique channel in that the benefits can range from the digital to the analog: from local links to a booth, from social posts to signage on a soccer field. The common thread is joining the community by partnering with local organizations, but the benefits themselves vary widely.

We’ve identified and track 24 unique benefits of sponsorships related to local marketing:

  1. Ad (full or partial)
  2. Advertising on event app
  3. Blog post featuring sponsor
  4. Booth, tent, or table at event
  5. Event named for sponsor
  6. Guest post on organization blog
  7. Inclusion in press release
  8. Link in email newsletter
  9. Link on website
  10. Logo on event t-shirt or other swag
  11. Logo on signage
  12. Logo or name on website
  13. Media spots (television/radio/newspaper)
  14. Mention in email newsletter
  15. Mention in publicity materials, such as programs & other printed materials
  16. Networking opportunity
  17. Physical thing (building, etc.) named for sponsor
  18. Social media mention
  19. Speaking opportunity at event
  20. Sponsor & sponsor’s employees receive discounts on services/products/events
  21. Sponsor can donate merchandise for goodie bags
  22. Sponsored post (on blog or online magazine)
  23. Tickets to event
  24. Verbal recognition

There are probably more, but in our experience most benefits fall into these core categories. That said, these benefits aren’t necessarily for everyone…

Who shouldn’t do local sponsorships?

1. Don’t do local sponsorships if you need fast turnaround.

Campaigns can take 1–3 months from launch until fulfillment. If you’re in a hurry to see a return, just increase your search ad budget.

2. Don’t do local sponsorships if you’re not okay with the branding component.

Local link building can certainly be measured, as can coupon usage, email addresses gathered for a drawing, etc… But measuring local brand lift still isn’t a perfect art form. Leave pure attribution to digital ads.

3. Don’t do local sponsorships with a “one size fits all” expectation.

The great thing about local events and opportunities is their diversity. While some components can be scaled, others require high touch outreach, more similar to a PR campaign.

Considerations for agencies vs brands in local sponsorship campaigns

Agencies, especially if they’re creating sponsorship campaigns for multiple clients, can cast a wide net and select from the best opportunities that return. Even if a potential partnership isn’t a good fit for a current client, they may work for a client down the road. Brands, on the other hand, need to be a little more goal and mission-focused during prospecting and outreach. If they’re reaching out to organizations that are clearly a bad fit, they’re wasting everyone’s time.

Brands also need to be more careful because they have a consumer-facing image to protect. As with any outreach campaign, there are dos and don’ts and best practices that all should follow (DO be respectful; DON’T over-email), but brands especially have more to lose from an outreach faux pas.


Our process

Outreach

Once we’ve identified local organizations in a given metro area, we recommend reaching out with an email to introduce ourselves and learn more about sponsorship opportunities. In two years, the ZipSprout team has A/B tested 100 different email templates.

With these initial emails, we’re trying to inform without confusing or scaring away potential new partners. Some templates have resulted in local organizations thinking we’re asking them for sponsorship money or that we want to charge them for a service. Oops! A/B tests have helped to find the best wording for clarity and, in turn, response rate.

Here are some of our learnings:

1. Mentioning location matters.

We reached out to almost 1,000 Chicago organizations in the spring of 2017. When we mentioned Chicago in the email, the response rate increased by 20%.

2. Emails sent to organizations who already had sponsorship info on their websites were most successful if the email acknowledged the onsite sponsorship info and asked for confirmation.

These are also our most successful outreach attempts, likely because these organizations are actively looking for sponsors (as signified by having sponsorship info on their site). Further, by demonstrating that we’ve been on their site, we’re signaling a higher level of intent.

3. Whether or not we included an outreacher phone number in email signatures had no effect on response rate.

If anything, response rates were higher for emails with no phone number in signature, at 41% compared with 40.2%.

4. Shorter is better when it comes to outreach emails.

Consider the following two emails:

EMAIL A


Hi [NAME],

I sent an email last week, but in case you missed it, I figured I’d follow up. 🙂

I work to help corporate clients find local sponsorships. We’re an agency that helps our business clients identify and sponsor local organizations like [ORG NAME]. We’re paid by businesses who are looking for local sponsorships.

Often, local organizations are overlooked, so my company, ZipSprout, works for businesses who want to sponsor locally, but aren’t sure who to partner with. To that end, I’d love to learn more about [ORG NAME] and see what sponsorship opportunities you have available. Is there a PDF or list of cost and benefits you can share over email or a phone call?


Thanks,

___

EMAIL B

Hi [NAME],

I sent an email last week, but in case you missed it, I figured I’d follow up. 🙂

I’d love to learn more about [ORG NAME] and see what sponsorships you have available. Is there a PDF or list of cost and benefits you can share over email or a phone call?


Thanks,

___

In an 800-email test, Email B performed 30% better than Email A.

Matchmaking: How can I choose a sponsorship opportunity that fits my brand?

There are many ways to evaluate potential sponsorships.

These are the questions that help us match organizations with clients:

  • Who is your brand targeting (women, senior citizens, family-friendly, dog owners, new parents)?
  • Do you want to tie your brand with a particular cause (eco-friendly, professional associations, awareness foundations, advocacy groups)?
  • Is your campaign based on location? Are you launching your brand in a particular city? A particular zip code?
  • What is your total budget and per-sponsorship range? A top max price or a price range is a useful parameter — and perhaps the most important.

Once the campaign goals are determined, we filter through opportunities based partially on their online presence. We look at Domain Authority, location, website aesthetics, and other sponsors (competitors and non-competitors) in addition to Reach Score (details below).

Further, we review backlinks, organic traffic, and referring domains. We make sure that this nonprofit partnership is not spammy or funky from an SEO perspective and that is a frequently visited website. A small organization may not have all the juicy digital metrics, but by gauging event attendance or measuring organic traffic we can further identify solid prospects that could have been missed otherwise.

We also look at social media presence; event attendance, event dates and how responsive these organizations or event organizers are. Responsiveness, we have learned, is a CRITICAL variable. It can be the determining point of your link going live in 48 hours or less, as opposed to 6+ months from payment.

Reach Score

From a numbers perspective, Domain Authority is a good way to appreciate the value of a website, but it doesn’t tell the whole story when it comes to local marketing. To help fill in the gaps we created Reach Score, which combines virtual measures (like Domain Authority) with social measures (friends/followers) and physical measures (event attendance). The score ranks entities based on their metro area, so we’re not comparing the reach of an organization in Louisville, KY to one in NYC.

As of March 2018, we have about 8,000 organizations with valid Reach Scores across four metro areas — Raleigh/Durham, Boston, Houston, and Chicago. The average Reach Score is 37 out of 100. Of the 34 types of organizations that we track, the most common is Event Venue/Company (average Reach Score of 38), followed by Advocacy Groups (43) and Sports Teams/Clubs/Leagues (22). The types of organizations with the highest Reach Scores are Local Government (64), Museums (63), and Parks and Recreation (55).

Thanks to Reach Score, we’ve found differences between organizations from city to city as well. In Raleigh-Durham, the entities with the highest reach tend to be government-related organizations, such as Chambers of Commerce and Parks & Rec Departments.

In Boston, the highest reach tends to fall to arts organizations, such as music ensembles, as well as professional associations. This score serves as a good reminder that each metro area has a unique community of local organizations. (Read more about our Reach Score findings here.)

Fulfillment

Our campaigns used to take several months to complete, from contract to final sponsorship. Now our average fulfillment rate is 18.7 days, regardless of our project size! Staying (politely) on top of the communication with the nonprofit organizations was the main driver for this improvement.

We find further that the first 48 hours from sending a notification of sponsorship on behalf of your brand are crucial to speedy campaigns. Be ready to award the sponsorship funds in a timely manner and follow up with a phone call or an email, checking in to see if these funds have been received.

It’s okay to ask when can you expect the sponsorship digital benefits to go live and how to streamline the process for any other deliverables needed to complete the sponsorship.

Applying these simple best practices, our team has been able to run a campaign in a week or less.

Two important concepts to remember about the sponsorship channel from the fulfillment perspective:

  1. It’s difficult to fulfill. If your city project involves any more than two or three sponsorships, you’re in for multiple hours of follow ups, reminders, phone calls, etc. There is the desire from most local organizations to honor their sponsors and keep them happy. That said, we’ve learned that keeping the momentum going serves as an important reminder for the nonprofit. This can involve phone call reminders and emails for links to go live and other benefits to come through. Again, be polite and respectful.
  2. It’s SO worth all the effort though! It shows that your brand cares. A sponsorship campaign is a fantastic way to get in front of your target audience in areas that have a special meaning at a personal level. And not in a broad general scope, but locally. Locally sponsoring a beach cleanup in Santa Monica gives you the opportunity to impact a highly localized audience with a very particular cause in mind that would ultimately affect their everyday life, as opposed to partnering with a huge foundation advocating for clean oceans.

Enhancing a local campaign

Some prefer to use local sponsorships as a link building effort, but there are ways — and ample benefit — to going far beyond the link.

Local event attendance

So, so many local sponsorship campaigns come with the opportunity for event attendance. We currently have 11,345 opportunities in our database (62.2% of our total inventory) that feature events: 5Ks, galas, performances, parades, and even a rubber ducky derby or two! If you’re able to send local team members, find opportunities that match your target audience and test it out — and bring your camera so your social and brand team will have material for publication. If local team members aren’t an option, consider working with a notable and ambitious startup such as Field Day, which can send locals out on behalf of your brand. We’ve spoken with them on several occasions and found them adaptable and wonderful to work with.

Coupons/invitations

One client, FunBrands, used local sponsorships as a way to reach out to locals ahead of stores’ grand re-openings (read the full case study here).

For another client, we created unique coupons for each local organization, using print and social media posts for distribution.

An example coupon — use codes to track attribution back to an event.


Conclusion: Local sponsorships are a channel

Sponsorships are an actionable strategy that contribute to your local rankings, while providing unprecedented opportunities for community engagement and neighborly branding. We hope that this updated guide will provide a strong operational overview along with realistic expectations — and even inspirations — for a local sponsorship campaign in your target cities.

Last but not least: As with all outreach campaigns, please remember to be human. Keep in mind that local engagements are the living extension of your brand in the real world. And if somehow this article wasn’t enough, we just finished up The Local Sponsorship Playbook. Every purchase comes with a 30-minute consultation with the author. We hope everyone chooses to get out, get local, and join the community in the channel that truly benefits everyone.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from tracking.feedpress.it

MozCon 2018: The Initial Agenda

Posted by Trevor-Klein

With just over three months until MozCon 2018, we’re getting a great picture of what this year’s show will be like, and we can’t wait to share some of the details with you today.

We’ve got 21 speakers lined up (and will be launching our Community Speaker process soon — stay tuned for more details on how to make your pitch!). You’ll see some familiar faces, and some who’ll be on the MozCon stage for the first time, with topics ranging from the evolution of searcher intent to the increasing importance of local SEO, and from navigating bureaucracy for buy-in to cutting the noise out of your reporting.

Topic details and the final agenda are still in the works, but we’re excited enough about the conversations we’ve had with speakers that we wanted to give you a sneak peek. We hope to see you in Seattle this July 9–11!

If you still need your tickets, we’ve got you covered:

Pick up your ticket to MozCon!

The Speakers

Here’s a look at who you’ll see on stage this year, along with some of the topics we’ve already worked out:


Jono Alderson

Mad Scientist, Yoast

The Democratization of SEO

Jono will explore how much time and money we collectively burn by fixing the same kinds of basic, “binary,” well-defined things over and over again (e.g., meta tags, 404s, URLs, etc), when we could be teaching others throughout our organizations not to break them in the first place.

As long as we “own” technical SEO, there’s no reason (for example) for the average developer to learn it or care — so they keep making the same mistakes. We proclaim that others are doing things wrong, but by doing so we only reinforce the line between our skills and theirs.

We need to start giving away bits of the SEO discipline, and technical SEO is probably the easiest thing for us to stop owning.

In his talk, he’ll push for more democratization, education, collaboration, and investment in open source projects so we can fix things once, rather than a million times.


Stephanie Briggs

Partner, Briggsby

Search-Driven Content Strategy

Google’s improvements in understanding language and search intent have changed how and why content ranks. As a result, many SEOs are chasing rankings that Google has already decided are hopeless.

Stephanie will cover how this should impact the way you write and optimize content for search, and will help you identify the right content opportunities. She’ll teach you how to persuade organizations to invest in content, and will share examples of strategies and tactics she has used to grow content programs by millions of visits.


Rob Bucci

CEO, STAT Search Analytics

“Near me” or Far:
How Google May Be Deciding Your Local Intent for You

In August 2017, Google stated that local searches without the “near me” modifier had grown by 150% and that searchers were beginning to drop geo-modifiers — like zip code and neighborhood — from local queries altogether. But does Google still know what searchers are after?

For example: the query [best breakfast places] suggests that quality takes top priority; [breakfast places near me] indicates that close proximity is essential; and [breakfast places in Seattle] seems to cast a city-wide net; while [breakfast places] is largely ambiguous.

By comparing non-geo-modified keywords against those modified with the prepositional phrases “near me” and “in [city name]” and qualifiers like “best,” we hope to understand how Google interprets different levels of local intent and uncover patterns in the types of SERPs produced.

With a better understanding of how local SERPs behave, SEOs can refine keyword lists, tailor content, and build targeted campaigns accordingly.


Neil Crist

VP of Product, Moz

The Local Sweet Spot: Automation Isn’t Enough

Some practitioners of local SEO swear by manual curation, claiming that automation skips over the most important parts. Some swear the exact opposite. The real answer, especially when you’re working at enterprise scale, is a sweet spot in the middle.

In this talk, Neil will show you where that spot is, why different verticals require different work, and some original research that reveals which of those verticals are most stable.


Dana DiTomaso

President and Partner, Kick Point

Traffic vs. Signal

With an ever-increasing slate of options in tools like Google Tag Manager and Google Data Studio, marketers of all stripes are falling prey to the habit of “I’ll collect this data because maybe I’ll need it eventually,” when in reality it’s creating a lot of noise for zero signal.

We’re still approaching our metrics from the organization’s perspective, and not from the customer’s perspective. Why, for example, are we not reporting on (or even thinking about, really) how quickly a customer can do what they need to do? Why are we still fixated on pageviews? In this talk, Dana will focus our attention on what really matters.


Rand Fishkin

Founder, SparkToro, Moz, & Inbound.org

A man who needs no introduction to MozCon, we’re thrilled to announce that Rand will be back on stage this year after founding his new company, SparkToro. Topic development for his talk is in the works; check back for more information!


Oli Gardner

Co-Founder, Unbounce

Content Marketing Is Broken and Only Your M.O.M. Can Save You

Traditional content marketing focuses on educational value at the expense of product value, which is a broken and outdated way of thinking. We all need to sell a product, and our visitors all need a product to improve their lives, but we’re so afraid of being seen as salesy that somehow we got lost, and we forgot why our content even exists.

We need our M.O.M.s!

No, he isn’t talking about your actual mother. He’s talking about your Marketing Optimization Map — your guide to exploring the nuances of optimized content marketing through a product-focused lens.

In this session you’ll learn:

  • Data and lessons learned from his biggest ever content marketing experiment, and how those lessons have changed his approach to content
  • A context-to-content-to-conversion strategy for big content that converts
  • Advanced methods for creating “choose your own adventure” navigational experiences to build event-based behavioral profiles of your visitors (using GTM and GA)
  • Innovative ways to productize and market the technology you already have, with use cases your customers had never considered

Casie Gillette

Senior Director, Digital Marketing, KoMarketing

The Problem with Content & Other Things We Don’t Want to Admit

Everyone thinks they need content but they don’t think about why they need it or what they actually need to create. As a result, we are overwhelmed with poor quality content and marketers are struggling to prove the value.

In this session, we’ll look at some of the key challenges facing marketers today and how a data-driven strategy can help us make better decisions.


Emily Grossman

Mobile Product Marketer & App Strategist

What All Marketers Can Do about Site Speed

At this point, we should all have some idea of how important site speed is to our performance in search. The mobile-first index underscored that fact yet again. It isn’t always easy for marketers to know where to start improving their site’s speed, though, and a lot of folks mistakenly believe they need developers for most of those improvements. Emily will clear that up with an actionable tour of just how much impact our own work can have on getting our sites to load quickly enough for today’s standards.


Russ Jones

Principal Search Scientist, Moz

Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics

Russ is our principal search scientist here at Moz. After a decade as CTO of an agency, he joined Moz to focus on what he’s most interested in: research and development, primarily related to keyword and link data. He’s responsible for many of our most forward-looking techniques.

At MozCon this year, he’s looking to focus on cutting through bad metrics with far better metrics, exploring the hidden assumptions and errors in things our industry regularly reports, showing us all how we can paint a more accurate picture of what’s going on.


Justine Jordan

VP Marketing, Litmus

A veteran of the MozCon stage, Justine is obsessed with helping marketers create, test, and send better email. Named an Email Marketer Thought Leader of the Year, she is strangely passionate about email marketing, hates being called a spammer, and still gets nervous when pressing send.

At MozCon this year, she’s looking to cover the importance of engagement with emails in today’s world of marketing. With the upcoming arrival of GDPR and the ease with which you can unsubscribe and report spam, it’s more important than ever to treat people like people instead of just leads.


Michael King

Managing Director, iPullRank

You Don’t Know SEO

Or maybe, “SEO you don’t know you don’t know.” We’ve all heard people throw jargon around in an effort to sound smart when they clearly don’t know what it means, and our industry of SEO is no exception. There are aspects of search that are acknowledged as important, but seldom actually understood. Mike will save us from awkward moments, taking complex topics like the esoteric components of information retrieval and log-file analysis, pairing them with a detailed understanding of technical implementation of common SEO recommendations, and transforming them into tools and insights we wish we’d never neglected.


Cindy Krum

CEO & Founder, MobileMoxie

Mobile-First Indexing or a Whole New Google

The emergence of voice-search and Google Assistant is forcing Google to change its model in search, to favor their own entity understanding or the world, so that questions and queries can be answered in context. Many marketers are struggling to understand how their website and their job as an SEO or SEM will change, as searches focus more on entity-understanding, context and action-oriented interaction. This shift can either provide massive opportunities, or create massive threats to your company and your job — the main determining factor is how you choose to prepare for the change.


Dr. Pete Meyers

Marketing Scientist, Moz

Dr. Peter J. Meyers (AKA “Dr. Pete”) is a Marketing Scientist for Seattle-based Moz, where he works with the marketing and data science teams on product research and data-driven content. Guarding the thin line between marketing and data science — which is more like a hallway and pretty wide — he’s the architect behind MozCast, the keeper of the Algo History, and watcher of all things Google.


Britney Muller

Senior SEO Scientist, Moz

Britney is Moz’s senior SEO scientist. An explorer and investigator at heart, she won’t stop digging until she gets to the bottom of some of the most interesting developments in the world of search. You can find her on Whiteboard Friday, and she’s currently polishing a new (and dramatically improved!) version of our Beginner’s Guide to SEO.

At MozCon this year, she’ll show you what she found at the bottom of the rabbit hole to save you the journey.


Lisa Myers

CEO, Verve Search

None of Us Is as Smart as All of Us

Success in SEO, or in any discipline, is frequently reliant on people’s ability to work together. Lisa Myers started Verve Search in 2009, and from the very beginning was convinced of the importance of building a diverse team, then developing and empowering them to find their own solutions.

In this session she’ll share her experiences and offer actionable advice on how to attract, develop and retain the right people in order to build a truly world-class team.


Heather Physioc

Director of Organic Search, VML

Your Red-Tape Toolkit:
How to Win Trust and Get Approval for Search Work

Are your search recommendations overlooked and misunderstood? Do you feel like you hit roadblocks at every turn? Are you worried that people don’t understand the value of your work? Learn how to navigate corporate bureaucracy and cut through red tape to help clients and colleagues understand your search work — and actually get it implemented. From diagnosing client maturity to communicating where search fits into the big picture, these tools will equip you to overcome obstacles to doing your best work.


Mike Ramsey

President, Nifty Marketing

The Awkward State of Local

You know it exists. You know what a citation is, and have a sense for the importance of accurate listings. But with personalization and localization playing an increasing role in every SERP, local can no longer be seen in its own silo — every search and social marketer should be honing their understanding. For that matter, it’s also time for local search marketers to broaden the scope of their work.


Wil Reynolds

Founder & Director of Digital Strategy, Seer Interactive

Excel Is for Rookies:
Why Every Search Marketer Needs to Get Strong in BI, ASAP

The analysts are coming for your job, not AI (at least not yet). Analysts stopped using Excel years ago; they use Tableau, Power BI, Looker! They see more data than you, and that is what is going to make them a threat to your job. They might not know search, but they know data. I’ll document my obsession with Power BI and the insights I can glean in seconds which is helping every single client at Seer at the speed of light. Search marketers must run to this opportunity, as analysts miss out on the insights because more often than not they use these tools to report. We use them to find insights.


Alexis Sanders

Technical SEO Account Manager, Merkle

Alexis works as a Technical SEO Account Manager at Merkle, ensuring the accuracy, feasibility, and scalability of the agency’s technical recommendations across all verticals. You’ve likely seen her on the Moz blog, Search Engine Land, OnCrawl, The Raven Blog, and TechnicalSEO.com. She’s got a knack for getting the entire industry excited about the more technical aspects of SEO, and if you haven’t already, you’ve got to check out the technical SEO challenge she created at https://TechnicalSEO.expert.


Darren Shaw

Founder, Whitespark

At the forefront of local SEO, Darren is obsessed with knowing all there is to know about local search. He organizes and publishes research initiatives such as the annual Local Search Ranking Factors survey and the Local Search Ecosystem.

At MozCon this year, he’ll unveil the newest findings from the Local Search Ranking Factors study, for which he’s already noticing significant changes from the last release, letting SEOs of all stripes know how they need to adjust their approach.


Grab your ticket today!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 3 weeks ago from tracking.feedpress.it

These five email programs will make you stand out in the inbox

So, you’ve made the decision to take on an ecommerce connector using Commerce Flow or Magento, for instance; it’s all hooked up with dotmailer and ready to go. What next?

As with all data-driven marketing, your customer insight has to sit at the very heart of your email. This is particularly the case if you wish to move away from ‘batch and blast’ – or ‘spray and pray’ as I like to call it – to sending the right message, to the right person, at the right time.

An extension to this mantra is also “on the right channel”. With the recent acquisition of COMAPI, dotmailer customers now have more choice over the digital channels on which to convey marketing messages – but that’s a blog for another day.

Automation is a method that enables time-poor marketers to deliver the right message, to the right person, at the right time. BUT, the triggers to enrol a subscriber onto an automation program (or the logic behind it) is all based on… Well you guessed it – data.

Hooking up your ecommerce platform with dotmailer ensures you get valuable transactional data into your email platform, empowering you to tailor the experience around the actions of subscribers.

So, I’ve collated the must-have automations that – regardless of what product you’re selling – should be at the top of your list. And once implemented, you can scope programs as per the industry or sector you’re operating in.

1. Welcome program

The welcome journey would be the first email contact you have with subscribers after they’ve signed up. As with the real world, you’ve only one shot to make a good impression, so make it count!

Your welcome program should set the tone of what subscribers will receive moving forward. A good starting place is a three-part series:

  • In the first email, thank your subscribers for signing up and reinforce the reasons why they did so in the first place – this is the prime time to shout about your USPs and the exclusive benefits of being opted-in.
  • As a follow up to the initial email, you should begin building your relationship with customers by telling them your brand story. Make sure subscribers understand your USPs and make your proposition as compelling as possible, recommending the most-viewed or most-purchased products on your site for instance.
  • Email three is the perfect opportunity to prompt subscribers to act. If they haven’t made their first purchase yet, encourage them to do so. If they have made their first purchase, ask them instead to fill in your preference center so you can further tailor their digital experience.

Charlotte Tilbury’s stylish welcome email provides subscribers with a backdrop to the brand and asks for details – such as hair color and skin tone – to drive relevant communications.

2. Post-purchase program

Now that subscribers have made their first purchase, it’s time to enrol them onto an aftersales program that communicates thanks and rewards them for their business with you over that of a competitor. It doesn’t have to be a discount (although research we’ve conducted with the Direct Marketing Association indicates that discounts and money offs are most effective); you can reinforce their decision was the right one by highlighting relevant customer testimonials and awarding loyalty points. Remember, reassurance (especially of an impulsive buy) goes a long way.

With every purchase that follows, customers can be automatically enrolled onto an aftersales program that collects product reviews and drives value-added content; both are likely to bolster UGC for other email programs and enrich your brand’s credibility.

Tangle Teezer does a great job of maximizing its customer loyalty with product-focused tips and inspiring UCG.

3. Abandoned cart

In my experience, this is the automation of automations. Abandoned cart is without a doubt the highest revenue-generating program I’ve come across. Subscribers – whether intentionally or unintentionally – leave their carts full and unattended; sending them a prompt reminder so that they ‘don’t miss out’ or even a cheeky discount (if it’s been a slow month) is guaranteed to produce great results.

I would experiment between a one- and three-stage abandoned cart program to see what works best for you. But be warned, some of the more savvier consumers will abandon their purchase intentionally to seek out a discount code, as they recognize that many brands will use it as incentive to recover lost carts.

Oliver Bonas tempts subscribers back to their cart using data-triggered notifications.

4. Loyalty program

Loyalty programs can be straightforward and help you generate the advocacy enjoyed by the likes of ASOS, winner of our 2017 benchmark report – Hitting the Mark.

The logic behind a loyalty program could be as simple as having the enrollment criteria set to customers’ average order value (AOV) or a minimum number of orders made in the last 6 months. Conditions to enroll might be an AOV that’s equal to or greater than £100, for instance.

An automation can be triggered when the rules you’ve set up have been met, informing loyal customers that they’ve qualified for membership in a special VIP club, and of their exclusive access to additional benefits or gifts.

Triggering this automation will update the relative ‘data-field’ within dotmailer, marking customers that have enrolled as ‘VIPs’. You can then leverage this insight to enrich the relevancy of your business-as-usual newsletters, using dynamic content to display extra information that’s exclusive to your more loyal customers.

Conversely, another automation could be built and triggered if customers’ AOV or number of orders (made over a certain period) are below the prerequisites of entering the VIP club; they’d be either encouraged to make a purchase or enrolled onto a winback program.

Ellisons drip-feeds discounts to customers as means to strengthen retention and inspire loyalty.

5. Re-engagement program

A re-engagement (or winback) program could be based on a period of subscriber inactivity – i.e. the last time subscribers have opened or clicked in an email. Pro:Direct, for example, prompts unengaged subscribers to remain in the loop or connect on other channels.

But in an ecommerce scenario, I’d base the criterion on when they last made a purchase.

If a number of days or months has elapsed and a subscriber hasn’t made a purchase, sending a ‘we miss you’ campaign is sure to rouse their engagement and compel them to act. Things to potentially include are some inspirational UGC, USPs, freebies or a discretionary discount.

Ready, set, go!

Once you’ve got these five automations in place, you’re well on the road to delivering the right message, to the right person, at the right time. If you’d like more advice on tailoring automations to your business, please feel free to contact your account manager.

And for more automation inspiration, check out our best practice guide on growing your ecommerce business with email.

The post These five email programs will make you stand out in the inbox appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Don’t stifle creativity by process

Scott Field is the Director of Communications at Team GB (The British Olympic Association), a role he decided to take after previously being Head of Media Relations at the FA.

He’s just returned from a successful Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, where Team GB mustered the enthusiasm of British athletes and fans alike; upon his return, we were keen for Scott to recall his experience and share it with us.

There’s no doubt that the British Olympic Association believes strongly in sport, as a means to challenge, inspire and unify us. The body has a vision to empower people to push themselves to the finish line and accomplish the ‘impossible’. At the end of the day, we’re all aspiring to be the best we can be – aren’t we?

This is a strong proposition and marketing is a crucial tool to get the message across in the most impactful way possible. We stopped in for a chat with Scott to get a little insight into what goes on in the mind of a Director at one of the most inspirational organizations of our time…

 

1. You moved from the FA to the Olympics – what do you think has been the biggest difference between the two?

Clearly, The FA is under incredible scrutiny and such is the prominence of football in the media and popular culture, the sport is constantly in the spotlight. Olympic Sport, on the other hand, has to work hard(er) for its coverage.

 

2. You’ve recently come back from the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang which must have been an amazing experience – is there a lot of difference between the Summer and Winter Olympics? Is there one that you prefer?

There is a great difference in the scale and therefore the intensity of the competition, but the sport is still of the highest quality. There is also an obvious difference in the athletes around free sports such as ski and snowboard park and pipe disciplines which makes it a really refreshing mix. It’ll be great to see free sports such as surfing and skateboarding in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games for that reason. No comment, on which one I prefer – I enjoy them both!

 

3. Can you give a small indication into what you will be covering at the dotmailer Summit – perhaps the key takeaways people can expect to leave with?

Hopefully I’ll make you smile and reprise a few great sporting stories from the Games, but maybe an insight into how we create our narrative to genuinely drive and support wider business development.

 

4. Have you seen any campaigns recently that you thought was particularly good?

KFC’s FCK apology. A good way out of a tough period.

 

5. Technology is becoming more and more prominent and impacting us all in different ways – have you got any key thoughts on this subject? And how you see this influencing our lives and our future?

There’s a creeping prevalence – some good, some bad. Spending an intense five weeks at the Games has made me think I need to put my phone down for a period. I see my very young children interacting with Alexa at home and realise their childhoods and futures are a world away from our own. It helps you remember that we need to retain balance in life, between digital and analogue lives – social media and conversation, physical activity versus sedentary activity.

 

6. What do you think will be the industry’s biggest opportunity in 2018?

Creativity is at the heart of everything we do. Great ideas provide opportunity.

 

7. Is there any particular advice that you would you give a marketer today?

See above. Don’t stifle creativity by process.

 

8. And lastly has there been anything that has truly inspired you lately?

Yes. I often get the opportunity to sit and listen to some of the most insightful and fascinating people and I had an hour listening to Dr Steve Peters recently. His words, anecdotes and insight can’t help but energise me.

 

Thank you so much Scott for sharing your insights, as well as some general inspiration. We’re looking forward to welcoming you on stage on the 19th April at the dotmailer Summit 2018!

Why attend the dotmailer Summit? Find out here.

The post Don’t stifle creativity by process appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

How to Boost Bookings & Conversions with Google Posts: An Interview with Joel Headley

Posted by MiriamEllis

Have you been exploring all the ways you might use Google Posts to set and meet brand goals?

Chances are good you’ve heard of Google Posts by now: the micro-blogging Google My Business dashboard feature which instantly populates content to your Knowledge Panel and individual listing. We’re still only months into the release of this fascinating capability, use of which is theorized as having a potential impact on local pack rankings. When I recently listened to Joel Headley describing his incredibly creative use of Google Posts to increase healthcare provider bookings, it’s something I was excited to share with the Moz community here.


Joel Headley

Joel Headley worked for over a decade on local and web search at Google. He’s now the Director of Local SEO and Marketing at healthcare practice growth platform PatientPop. He’s graciously agreed to chat with me about how his company increased appointment bookings by about 11% for thousands of customer listings via Google Posts.

How PatientPop used Google Posts to increase bookings by 11%

Miriam: So, Joel, Google offers a formal booking feature within their own product, but it isn’t always easy to participate in that program, and it keeps users within “Google’s walled garden” instead of guiding them to brand-controlled assets. As I recently learned, PatientPop innovated almost instantly when Google Posts was rolled out in 2017. Can you summarize for me what your company put together for your customers as a booking vehicle that didn’t depend on Google’s booking program?

Joel: PatientPop wants to provide patients an opportunity to make appointments directly with their healthcare provider. In that way, we’re a white label service. Google has had a handful of booking products. In a prior iteration, there was a simpler product that was powered by schema and microforms, which could have scaled to anyone willing to add the schema.

Today, they are putting their effort behind Reserve with Google, which requires a much deeper API integration. While PatientPop would be happy to provide more services on Google, Reserve with Google doesn’t yet allow most of our customers, according to their own policies. (However, the reservation service is marketed through Google My Business to those categories, which is a bit confusing.)

Additionally, when you open the booking widget, you see two logos: G Pay and the booking software provider. I’d love to see a product that allows the healthcare provider to be front and center in the entire process. A patient-doctor relationship is personal, and we’d like to emphasize you’re booking your doctor, not PatientPop.

Because we can’t get the CTAs unique to Reserve with Google, we realized that Google Posts can be a great vehicle for us to essentially get the same result.

When Google Posts first launched, I tested a handful of practices. The interaction rate was low compared to other elements in the Google listing. But, given there was incremental gain in traffic, it seemed worthwhile, if we could scale the product. It seemed like a handy way to provide scheduling with Google without having to go through the hoops of the Maps Booking (reserve with) API.

Miriam: Makes sense! Now, I’ve created a fictitious example of what it looks like to use Google Posts to prompt bookings, following your recommendations to use a simple color as the image background and to make the image text quite visible. Does this look similar to what PatientPop is doing for its customers and can you provide recommendations for the image size and font size you’ve seen work best?

Joel: Yes, that’s pretty similar to the types of Posts we’re submitting to our customer listings. I tested a handful of image types, ones with providers, some with no text, and the less busy image with actionable text is what performed the best. I noticed that making the image look more like a button, with button-like text, improved click-through rates too — CTR doubled compared to images with no text.

The image size we use is 750×750 with 48-point font size. If one uses the API, the image must be square cropped when creating the post. Otherwise, Posts using the Google My Business interface will give you an option to crop. The only issue I have with the published version of the image: the cropping is uneven — sometimes it is center-cropped, but other times, the bottom is cut off. That makes it hard to predict when on-image text will appear. But we keep it in the center which generally works pretty well.

Miriam: And, when clicked on, the Google Post takes the user to the client’s own website, where PatientPop software is being used to manage appointments — is that right?

Joel: Yes, the site is built by PatientPop. When selecting Book, the patient is taken directly to the provider’s site where the booking widget is opened and an appointment can be selected from a calendar. These appointments can be synced back to the practice’s electronic records system.

Miriam: Very tidy! As I understand it, PatientPop manages thousands of client listings, necessitating the need to automate this use of Google Posts. Without giving any secrets away, can you share a link to the API you used and explain how you templatized the process of creating Posts at scale?

Joel: Sure! We were waiting for Google to provide Posts via the Google My Business API, because we wanted to scale. While I had a bit of a heads-up that the API was coming — Google shared this feature with their GMB Top Contributor group — we still had to wait for it to launch to see the documentation and try it out. So, when the launch announcement went out on October 11, with just a few developers, we were able to implement the solution for all of our practices the next evening. It was a fun, quick win for us, though it was a bit of a long day. 🙂

In order to get something out that quickly, we created templates that could use information from the listing itself like the business name, category, and location. That way, we were able to create a stand-alone Python script that grabbed listings from Google. When getting the listings, all the listing content comes along with it, including name, address, and category. These values are taken directly from the listing to create Posts and then are submitted to Google. We host the images on AWS and reuse them by submitting the image URL with the post. It’s a Python script which runs as a cron job on a regular schedule. If you’re new to the API, the real tricky part is authentication, but the GMB community can help answer questions there.

Miriam: Really admirable implementation! One question: Google Posts expire after 7 days unless they are events, so are you basically automating re-posting of the booking feature for each listing every seven days?

Joel: We create Posts every seven days for all our practices. That way, we can mix up the content and images used on any given practice. We’re also adding a second weekly post for practices that offer aesthetic services. We’ll be launching more Posts for specific practice types going forward, too.

Miriam: Now for the most exciting part, Joel! What can you tell me about the increase in appointments this use of Google Posts has delivered for your customers? And, can you also please explain what parameters and products you are using to track this growth?

Joel: To track clicks from listings on Google, we use UTM parameters. We can then track the authority page, the services (menu) URL, the appointment URL, and the Posts URL.

When I first did this analysis, I looked at the average of the last three weeks of appointments compared to the 4 days after launch. Over that period, I saw nearly an 8% increase in online bookings. I’ve since included the entire first week of launch. It shows an 11% average increase in online bookings.

Additionally, because we’re tracking each URL in the knowledge panel separately, I can confidently say there’s no cannibalization of clicks from other URLs as a result of adding Posts. While authority page CTR remained steady, services lost over 10% of the clicks and appointment URLs gained 10%. That indicates to me that not only are the Posts effective in driving appointments through the Posts CTA, it emphasizes the existing appointment CTA too. This was in the context of no additional product changes on our side.

Miriam: Right, so, some of our readers will be using Google’s Local Business URLs (frequently used for linking to menus) to add an “Appointments” link. One of the most exciting takeaways from your implementation is that using Google Posts to support bookings didn’t steal attention away from the appointment link, which appears higher up in the Knowledge Panel. Can you explain why you feel the Google Posts clicks have been additive instead of subtractive?

Joel: The “make appointment” link gets a higher CTR than Posts, so it shouldn’t be ignored. However, since
Posts include an image, I suspect it might be attracting a different kind of user, which is more primed to interact with images. And because we’re so specific on the type of interaction we want (appointment booking), both with the CTA and the image, it seems to convert well. And, as I stated above, it seems to help the appointment URLs too.

Miriam: I was honestly so impressed with your creativity in this, Joel. It’s just brilliant to look at something as simple as this little bit of Google screen real estate and ask, “Now, how could I use this to maximum effect?” Google Posts enables business owners to include links labeled Book, Order Online, Buy, Learn More, Sign Up, and Get Offer. The “Book” feature is obviously an ideal match for your company’s health care provider clients, but given your obvious talent for thinking outside the box, would you have any creative suggestions for other types of business models using the other pre-set link options?

Joel: I’m really excited about the events feature, actually. Because you can create a long-lived post while adding a sense of urgency by leveraging a time-bound context. Events can include limited-time offers, like a sale on a particular product, or signups for a newsletter that will include a coupon code. You can use all the link labels you’ve listed above for any given event. And, I think using the image-as-button philosophy can really drive results. I’d like to see an image with text Use coupon code XYZ546 now! with the Get Offer button. I imagine many business types, especially retail, can highlight their limited time deals without paying other companies to advertise your coupons and deals via Posts.

Miriam: Agreed, Joel, there are some really exciting opportunities for creative use here. Thank you so much for the inspiring knowledge you’ve shared with our community today!


Ready to get the most from Google Posts?

Reviews can be a challenge to manage. Google Q&A may be a mixed blessing. But as far as I can see, Posts are an unalloyed gift from Google. Here’s all you have to do to get started using them right now for a single location of your business:

  • Log into your Google My Business dashboard and click the “Posts” tab in the left menu.
  • Determine which of the options, labeled “Buttons,” is the right fit for your business. It could be “Book,” or it could be something else, like “Sign up” or “Buy.” Click the “Add a Button” option in the Google Posts wizard. Be sure the URL you enter includes a UTM parameter for tracking purposes.
  • Upload a 750×750 image. Joel recommends using a simple-colored background and highly visible 42-point font size for turning this image into a CTA button-style graphic. You may need to experiment with cropping the image.
  • Alternatively, you can create an event, which will cause your post to stay live through the date of the event.
  • Text has a minimum 100-character and maximum 300-character limit. I recommend writing something that would entice users to click to get beyond the cut-off point, especially because it appears to me that there are different display lengths on different devices. It’s also a good idea to bear in mind that Google Posts are indexed content. Initial testing is revealing that simply utilizing Posts may improve local pack rankings, but there is also an interesting hypothesis that they are a candidate for long-tail keyword optimization experiments. According to Mike Blumenthal:

“…If there are very long-tail phrases, where the ability to increase relevance isn’t up against so many headwinds, then this is a signal that Google might recognize and help lift the boat for that long-tail phrase. My experience with it was it didn’t work well on head phrases, and it may require some amount of interaction for it to really work well. In other words, I’m not sure just the phrase itself but the phrase with click-throughs on the Posts might be the actual trigger to this. It’s not totally clear yet.”

  • You can preview your post before you hit the publish button.
  • Your post will stay live for 7 days. After that, it will be time to post a new one.
  • If you need to implement at scale across multiple listings, re-read Joel’s description of the API and programming PatientPop is utilizing. It will take some doing, but an 11% increase in appointments may well make it worth the investment! And obviously, if you happen to be marketing health care providers, checking out PatientPop’s ready-made solution would be smart.

Nobody likes a ball-hog

I’m watching the development of Google Posts with rapt interest. Right now, they reside on Knowledge Panels and listings, but given that they are indexed, it’s not impossible that they could eventually end up in the organic SERPs. Whether or not that ever happens, what we have right now in this feature is something that offers instant publication to the consumer public in return for very modest effort.

Perhaps even more importantly, Posts offer a way to bring users from Google to your own website, where you have full control of messaging. That single accomplishment is becoming increasingly difficult as rich-feature SERPs (and even single results) keep searchers Google-bound. I wonder if school kids still shout “ball-hog” when a classmate refuses to relinquish ball control and be a team player. For now, for local businesses, Google Posts could be a precious chance for your brand to handle the ball.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 1 month ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Keep it relevant, keep it real

A tale of two brands…

Imagine two brands – not too dissimilar in their offering – looking to send out email campaigns to prospects and customers.

One company is better known in the market and has already built up a contact list full of email addresses from people who’ve opted in. The marketer in this business builds a campaign showcasing the brand’s latest products and blasts it out to contacts. There’s no thought behind who they’re sending to, but at the same time, their subscribers have signed up – so this should be okay, right?

The other company, a lesser-known brand, has no contacts to send to and needs to start from scratch. After finalizing a plan, the team sets up a sign-up form on their website, collecting key data and email preferences. Once they get the information they want, they dissect the insight and create some data-driven campaigns to send to new subscribers.

Which brand is going to drive more relevance? The one with an already-established list of contacts? Or the start-up that’s attentive towards its contacts’ preferences and recognizes this will help improve its email performance?

The answer is – you guessed it! – the less known brand. They’ve asked their subscribers what they want to receive and what interests them. This will ensure that the brand’s future email campaigns are tailored to customers, driving the right amount of relevancy to generate the desired levels of engagement.

Personalization and segmentation are key in driving relevance-rich emails

This isn’t a top-secret, ‘mission impossible’ task; learning more about your contacts will allow you to craft personalized emails that engage your audiences and compel them to act. Tailoring the experience ultimately leads to greater returns from email, still considered the most lucrative of marketing channels. Let’s not forget that for every £1 that’s invested, £32 are generated (DMA Marketer email tracker 2018).

The Relevancy Group compared the email marketing performance of traditional campaigns to personalized emails, and in all metrics, the latter delivered healthier results; for instance, personalized campaigns generate an average order value $7 higher than that of batch and blast campaigns (The Return on Email Personalization report, 2017).

To ensure your email program is relevant for the entirety of the customer relationship, it’s crucial to request data that will help enrich your insight. Preferences to ask for include:

  • identifiable data such as email address, first name, gender, location and date of birth
  • interests in product categories, services, themes and topics etc.
  • channels such as email, SMS and direct mail
  • type and frequency of communications (i.e. weekly, monthly, promotion vs. editorial)

The beauty of aggregating key information from your subscriber base is that it enables you to forge a personalized message and offer a tailored proposition; nurturing your contacts may be a longer process of generating net sales, but it’s more effective, as you’re showing consistent value, building customer interest and laying the foundations for higher levels of ROI.

The best content to start with is the value-added – don’t jump in straight away with sales-blasting. Look at what subscribers have signed up for in their preferences and compose messages accordingly.

For example, you could send a birthday discount to customers or promote a local flash sale based on geolocation. What’s more, dotmailer’s dynamic content functionality allows you to populate relevant products, promotions or editorial pieces for different segments based on the data you’ve captured. If you’re a fashion retailer this might be a gender-specific range of apparel, or if you’re a kitchenware brand it could be some vegan-inspired recipes. Plus, subscribers who select communications based on a certain type or frequency can be enrolled onto automation programs that correspond with these preferences.

One thing is clear, steering the subscriber journey off the back of data will ensure you remain relevant to recipients and beat the clutter in the inbox – that’s 281 billion messages a day. And in the long run, personalizing emails through segmentation tactics will nurture subscribers into loyal customers and ignite their brand affection.

Key takeaway

Email marketing that’s tailored to the individual is proven to promote higher levels of customer engagement and ROI. Why? Because by sending the right message, to the right person, at the right time, you’re aligning all of the variables for relevancy to flourish. It’s the winning formula.

As marketers, we all know this. However, we’re often faced with obstacles – such as time, resource and data restraints – that impede our ability to deliver relevancy. This makes the simpler tactic of batch and blast more appealing, yet in today’s hyper-connected world, it won’t suffice.

But fear not – dotmailer makes creating relevant emails easy with our automation tool and segmentation builder. If you’d like more advice on how to make your emails more targeted, please reach out to your account manager.

The post Keep it relevant, keep it real appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Have you taken a look at our help center?

A bit about me

My name’s Jake and I’m a technical writer here at dotmailer.

Three months ago I joined what is now known as the ‘Technical Writing team’. You probably already know Neal, our senior technical writer, as he’s written most of the content in both the knowledge base and the developer hub so far!

My background is in languages. Although I’ve always been a writer and love to write, I decided that I wanted to learn a language other than English. I studied Applied Languages at Portsmouth University where I learned French and Spanish (and some Arabic). Since leaving University, I’ve used my knowledge of languages and the translation process to write for international audiences and make my writing easier to translate.

What do technical writers do?

Our goal as technical writers is to make it easier for you to find the answers to your questions. Let’s face it, you don’t want to be spending all your time looking for answers…

Essentially, we’re the gatherers of knowledge. We take the technical and make it accessible. We gather knowledge about new features and tasks that you might want to do, and we store all of this knowledge on our help center.

But we don’t just work alone in a cold, empty room; we work closely with a variety of teams at dotmailer, including our Support team who let us know which topics our users need help with and the reasons why.

Here’s a recent example of how we worked together with Support to improve the knowledge base:

We discovered that some users were asking how to send unique links to their contacts so that those contacts could download a PDF that was unique to them.

We decided that this information should be in an article on our help center. So, we made the topic more general (because you might want the link to go to an image or an Excel spreadsheet), then we added it to the knowledge base.

What’s in the help center?

1. Knowledge base

Our knowledge base is a full of living, breathing articles; we review them, update them and create new ones all the time.  If anyone ever thinks that platform users – like you – could benefit from some extra information, we put it in there. It’s a real oasis where you can find anything and everything about dotmailer. And, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, you can reach out to Support who will help with your particular question and let us know about it so that it’s in the knowledge base for next time!

2. Community

Our community section is a forum where you can ask questions or submit feature requests. Our friendly teams are on hand to answer any questions and check your feature requests.

3. Training videos

Our training videos are a great resource for those who are visual or audio learners. Our Training team has put together a collection of videos that aims to show you around the platform and give you a comprehensive idea of what you can accomplish.

4. Status

Our status section of the help center shows you the status of our system in each region. This section also lets you know when any scheduled or unscheduled updates have either occurred or are occurring.

In the top-right of this section, you can subscribe to email and SMS notifications so you’re always up to date with the latest status information.

5. Developer

Our developer hub is the knowledge base for developers. The developer hub describes how to use our API, including the following information:

  • Setup instructions
  • Endpoint descriptions for our REST and SOAP APIs
  • Error responses

 

Now you know a bit more about what we do and why we do it, why not take a look at our help center? You never know what you might find!

The post Have you taken a look at our help center? appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

What are the benefits of email marketing?

For the uninitiated, the benefits of email marketing may not be immediately clear. In fact, even seasoned marketing pros may not immediately be able to identify the many advantages of email marketing over other marketing methods.

There are many reasons why we believe – and know – that email marketing is one of, if not the best performing marketing channels that is available out there, to every single brand and business on the planet.

Everyone you email already knows your brand or business

In order to contact someone and market to them via email, you need their express permission – this makes email the strongest tool in your marketing toolbox.

Everyone who receives your emails will have already purchased from you, or shown interest in your brand or business. Whether you’re an online ecommerce retailer that they’ve purchased goods from before, or a SaaS provider whose service or content they’ve interacted with and shown interest in, you should already have an existing relationship with them.

Of course, there are still some brands and businesses out there who don’t play by these rules, but GDPR means that everyone should be getting permission from everyone before the send them any marketing emails. Not only that, increasingly smarter inbox filtering means that fewer spam messages now make it to the inbox, instead being sent straight to the spam folder.

Now, email marketers who choose to ignore best practice advice or new rules will see their deliverability suffer, while those who abide by the rules and respect their subscribers will make it to the inbox.

What this means is that consumers can expect fewer irrelevant marketing messages, and brands and businesses can hopefully expect their marketing lists to be engaged with their content, because subscribers have said that they want to receive emails from them.

It’s easy to use

There was a time when you needed to have a solid understanding of HTML and CSS to build email templates, but those days are long behind us now.

While there’s still a thriving community of email designers and coders, who are pushing the envelope in terms of what email can do and look like, modern marketing platforms and services have given everyday marketers the tools to build and send email campaigns, quickly and easily.

These visual, drag-and-drop style editors make the turnaround time of a campaign much quicker than it used to be. It also gives smaller businesses and one-person marketing teams the ability to enter the email game.

And although it’s easy to use, email can be hard to master. Once you start using it, you’ll soon learn that the smarter you are with your email campaigns, the better your results become. The next step is one of the easiest and simplest ways that you can benefit from smarter email marketing.

Segmentation drives relevancy, which generates engagement

Relevancy is key with email marketing. The average consumer now receives over 100 marketing emails every week (DMA Marketer email tracker 2018), and with attention spans waning, you need to make sure your emails are cutting through the noise of the modern-day inbox.

This is where segmentation of your audience comes in. The ‘batch and blast’ method no longer works. You need to make sure that the emails you’re sending are useful and relevant to the recipient. So, by segmenting your email lists, and sending campaigns that are targeted to these segments, you’ll see better results.

Many people act on impulse

Impulse buyers have long been swayed into purchases by other forms of marketing, and email is no different.

By adding clear calls-to-action in your emails, you increase the chances of the recipient clicking through to your website and completing a sale. The easier you make it for the customer to buy something, the likelier they are to complete an order.

What’s more, if you’re segmenting your lists and sending targeted communications and campaigns, then the chances of generating a purchase from your email increase even more!

The possibilities are endless

You can do anything with your email marketing. While most email marketing campaigns are intended to sell, that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the real benefits of using email marketing in your strategy is that you can use it to build and strengthen relationships with subscribers and customers.

From the moment someone signs up to your email list, and you (hopefully) send them a welcome email, there are endless possibilities for the types of email campaigns that you can send them. Think abandoned cart, browse, winback and loyalty.

This spans the full customer lifecycle – from acquisition to conversion, right through to retention and even advocacy, you can utilize email for the full journey.

You can accurately measure your success

One of the real advantages of using email marketing is that on most, if not all modern platforms, you can easily report on and measure the results of your email campaigns.

This makes it easy to see what’s working and what isn’t, and it also makes it a lot easier to highlight success and results for other areas of your business. If you’re having trouble getting buy-in to the importance of email marketing in your wider marketing strategy, then being able to produce accurate results is certainly one way of proving the importance of email.

Easy to use on a global scale

While most global marketing campaigns will be subject to subtle differences that make their execution difficult across different continents, email is – for the most part – exempt from this.

There will be the obvious challenges – different time zones, languages, and currencies will likely be the ones that crop up most – but, the real benefit of using email is that you can use it on a global scale with the minimum of fuss.

This is especially useful for brands and businesses looking to expand into different territories. In lieu of a physical store or office, email is a good starting point, even if it’s just to test the waters of international markets.

Scalable

Carrying on from the previous benefit of being useful on a global scale, email marketing is also scalable. It doesn’t matter whether you’ve got an email list of 1,000, or 10 million, you can still make email work in your marketing strategy.

The best advantage of using email is that your email marketing strategy can scale with the growth of your business. There are solutions out there for smaller businesses and startups, right the way up to enterprise, as well as omnichannel solutions for the large, multinational brands and businesses who have successfully built up a large global presence.

It doesn’t have to cost the earth

This goes hand-in-hand with the scalability of email marketing. Your use of email doesn’t have to cost more than you can afford. If you’re a small business or organization just starting on your email marketing journey, then there are several free or low-cost email marketing solutions available on the market which will be more than suitable for your needs.

When your email marketing strategy begins to grow along with your subscriber and customer lists, then there will always be appropriate email marketing software providers out there for you.

We know that dotmailer is a perfect example of this. Our platform is tailored for serious marketers who are well-versed in their email marketing strategy, and need the appropriate level of software features and strategic account management.

When the time comes to take your email marketing to the next level, you know where to find us.

ROI

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the real benefit of email marketing is the return on investment (ROI). £32 per £1 spent in the UK, and $30 Per $1 spent in the US is not to be laughed at.

In fact, ROI from email marketing has consistently outperformed other channels.

If you’re not already using email marketing, it’s easy to start. If it’s already part of your wider marketing strategy, you can use some of the tactics detailed above to gain an advantage over your competitors.

 

Just getting started with email marketing? Learn more about why first impressions count.

 

Already know your way around an email? Then find out why you should make time to save time with email marketing automation.

The post What are the benefits of email marketing? appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Multifaceted featured snippets begin rolling out in Google search results

Google updates the search results features with an expanded featured snippet targeting broad, nuanced queries

The post Multifaceted featured snippets begin rolling out in Google search results appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 month ago from feeds.searchengineland.com