MozCon 2019: The Top Takeaways From Day One

Posted by KameronJenkins

Rand, Russ, Ruth, Rob, and Ross. Dana and Darren. Shannon and Sarah. We didn’t mean to (we swear we didn’t) but the first day of MozCon was littered with alliteration, takeaways, and oodles of insights from our speakers. Topics ranged from local SEO, link building, and Google tools, and there was no shortage of “Aha!” moments. And while the content was diverse, the themes are clear: search is constantly changing. 

If you’re a Moz community member, you can access the slides from Day One. Not a community member yet? Sign up — it’s free!

Get the speaker slides!

Ready? Let’s make like Roger in his SERP submarine and dive right in!

Sarah’s welcome

Our fearless leader took the stage to ready our attendees for their deep sea dive over the next three days. Our guiding theme to help set the tone? The deep sea of data that we find ourselves immersed in every day.

People are searching more than ever before on more types of devices than ever before… we truly are living in the golden age of search. As Sarah explained though, not all search is created equal. Because Google wants to answer searchers’ questions as quickly as possible, they’ve moved from being the gateway to information to being the destination for information in many cases. SEOs need to be able to work smarter and identify the best opportunities in this new landscape. 

Rand Fishkin — Web Search 2019: The Essential Data Marketers Need

Next up was Rand of SparkToro who dropped a ton of data about the state of search in 2019.

To set the stage, Rand gave us a quick review of the evolution of media: “This new thing is going to kill this old thing!” has been the theme of panicked marketers for decades. TV was supposed to kill radio. Computers were supposed to kill TV. Mobile was supposed to kill desktop. Voice search was supposed to kill text search. But as Rand showed us, these new technologies often don’t kill the old ones — they just take up all our free time. We need to make sure we’re not turning away from mediums just because they’re “old” and, instead, make sure our investments follow real behavior.

Rand’s deck was also chock-full of data from Jumpshot about how much traffic Google is really sending to websites these days, how much of that comes from paid search, and how that’s changed over the years.

In 2019, Google sent ~20 fewer organic clicks via browser searches than in 2016.

In 2016, there were 26 organic clicks for every paid click. In 2019, that ratio is 11:1.

Google still owns the lion’s share of the search market and still sends a significant amount of traffic to websites, but in light of this data, SEOs should be thinking about how their brands can benefit even without the click.

And finally, Rand left us with some wisdom from the world of social — getting engagement on social media can get you the type of attention it takes to earn quality links and mentions in a way that’s much easier than manual, cold outreach.

Ruth Burr Reedy — Human > Machine > Human: Understanding Human-Readable Quality Signals and Their Machine-Readable Equivalents

It’s 2019. And though we all thought by this year we’d have flying cars and robots to do our bidding, machine learning has come a very long way. Almost frustratingly so — the push and pull of making decisions for searchers versus search engines is an ever-present SEO conundrum.

Ruth argued that in our pursuit of an audience, we can’t get too caught up in the middleman (Google), and in our pursuit of Google, we can’t forget the end user.

Optimizing for humans-only is inefficient. Those who do are likely missing out on a massive opportunity. Optimizing for search engines-only is reactive. Those who do will likely fall behind.

She also left us with the very best kind of homework… homework that’ll make us all better SEOs and marketers!

  • Read the Quality Rater Guidelines
  • Ask what your site is currently benefiting from that Google might eliminate or change in the future
  • Write better (clearer, simpler) content
  • Examine your SERPs with the goal of understanding search intent so you can meet it
  • Lean on subject matter experts to make your brand more trustworthy
  • Conduct a reputation audit — what’s on the internet about your company that people can find?

And last, but certainly not least, stop fighting about this stuff. It’s boring.

Thank you, Ruth!

Dana DiTomaso — Improved Reporting & Analytics Within Google Tools

Freshly fueled with cinnamon buns and glowing with the energy of a thousand jolts of caffeine, we were ready to dive back into it — this time with Dana from Kick Point.

This year was a continuation of Dana’s talk on goal charters. If you haven’t checked that out yet or you need a refresher, you can view it here

Dana emphasized the importance of data hygiene. Messy analytics, missing tracking codes, poorly labeled events… we’ve all been there. Dana is a big advocate of documenting every component of your analytics.

She also blew us away with a ton of great insight on making our reports accessible — from getting rid of jargon and using the client’s language to using colors that are compatible with printing.

And just when we thought it couldn’t get any more actionable, Dana drops some free Google Data Studio resources on us! You can check them out here.

(Also, close your tabs!)

Rob Bucci — Local Market Analytics: The Challenges and Opportunities

The first thing you need to know is that Rob finally did it — he finally got a cat.

Very bold of Rob to assume he would have our collective attention after dropping something adorable like that on us. Luckily, we were all able to regroup and focus on his talk — how there are challenges aplenty in the local search landscape, but there are even more opportunities if you overcome them.

Rob came equipped with a ton of stats about localized SERPs that have massive implications for rank tracking.

  • 73 percent of the 1.2 million SERPs he analyzed contained some kind of localized feature.
  • 25 percent of the sites he was tracking had some degree of variability between markets.
  • 85 percent was the maximum variability he saw across zip codes in a single market.

That’s right… rankings can vary by zip code, even for queries you don’t automatically associate as local intent. Whether you’re a national brand without physical storefronts or you’re a single-location retail store, localization has a huge impact on how you show up to your audience.

With this in mind, Rob announced a huge initiative that Moz has been working on… Local Market Analytics — complete with local search volume! Eep! See how you perform on hyper-local SERPs with precision and ease — whether you’re an online or location-based business.

It launched today as an invitation-only limited release. Want an invite? Request it here

Ross Simmonds— Keywords Aren’t Enough: How to Uncover Content Ideas Worth Chasing

Ross Simmonds was up next, and he dug into how you might be creating content wrong if you’re building it strictly around keyword research.

The methodology we marketers need to remember is Research – Rethink – Remix.

Research:

  • Find the channel your audience spends time on. What performs well? How can you serve this audience?

Rethink:

  • Find the content that your audience wants most. What topics resonate? What stories connect?

Remix:

  • Measure how your audience responds to the content. Can this be remixed further? How can we remix at scale?

If you use this method and you still aren’t sure if you should pursue a content opportunity, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Will it give us a positive ROI?
  • Does it fall within our circle of competence?
  • Does the benefit outweigh the cost of creation?
  • Will it give us shares and links and engagement?

Thanks, Ross, for such an actionable session!

Shannon McGuirk — How to Supercharge Link Building with a Digital PR Newsroom

Shannon of Aira Digital took the floor with real-life examples of how her team does link building at scale with what she calls the “digital PR newsroom.”

The truth is, most of us are still link building like it’s 1948 with “planned editorial” content. When we do this, we’re missing out on a ton of opportunity (about 66%!) that can come from reactive editorial and planned reactive editorial.

Shannon encouraged us to try tactics that have worked for her team such as:

  • Having morning scrum meetings to go over trending topics and find reactive opportunities
  • Staffing your team with both storytellers and story makers
  • Holding quarterly reviews to see which content types performed best and using that to inform future work

Her talk was so good that she even changed Cyrus’s mind about link building!

For free resources on how you can set up your own digital PR newsroom, visit: aira.net/mozcon19.

Darren Shaw— From Zero to Local Ranking Hero

Next up, Darren of Whitespark chronicled his 8-month long journey to growing a client’s local footprint.

Here’s what he learned and encouraged us to implement in response:

  • Track from multiple zip codes around the city
  • Make sure your citations are indexed
  • The service area section in GMB won’t help you rank in those areas. It’s for display purposes only
  • Invest in a Google reviews strategy
  • The first few links earned really have a positive impact, but it reaches a point of diminishing returns
  • Any individual strategy will probably hit a point of diminishing returns
  • A full website is better than a single-page GMB website when it comes to local rankings

As SEOs, we’d all do well to remember that it’s not one specific activity, but the aggregate, that will move the needle!

Russ Jones — Esse Quam Videri: When Faking it is Harder than Making It

Rounding out day one of MozCon was our very own Russ Jones on Esse Quam Videri — “To be, rather than to seem.”

By Russ’s own admission, he’s a pretty good liar, and so too are many SEOs. In a poll Russ ran on Twitter, he found that 64 percent of SEOs state that they have promoted sites they believe are not the best answer to the query. We can be so “rank-centric” that we engage in tactics that make our websites look like we care about the users, when in reality, what we really care about is that Google sees it.

Russ encouraged SEOs to help guide the businesses we work for to “be real companies” rather than trying to look like real companies purely for SEO benefit.

Thanks to Russ for reminding us to stop sacrificing the long run for the short run!

Phew — what a day!

And it ain’t over yet! There are two more days to make the most of MozCon, connect with fellow attendees, and pick the brains of our speakers. 

In the meantime, tell me in the comments below — if you had to pick just one thing, what was your favorite part about day one?

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 1 month ago from tracking.feedpress.it

dotdigital at MagentoLive Australia 2019

The latter was the first event for us as dotdigital, where the tradeshow was an exciting stage to share ideas and network with some of the biggest innovators in ecommerce. MagentoLive was a proud moment for the dotdigital family, as our Founder and President, Tink Taylor, introduced dotdigital and took the room through our rebranding journey during his presentation.

While speaking to the Australian media present on site about the rebranding, Tink said, “When we started 20 years ago, dotmailer as it was had 4,500 lines of code. We’ve now got 1.5 million lines of code and counting. Over time the functionality and capability of the platform has grown, it’s gotten deeper, wider, and broader, meanwhile the perception of what we do has probably stayed the same.”

“dotdigital’s
platform, which we now call Engagement Cloud, allows for much more
sophisticated segmentation, personalisation, and automation than simply
batch-and-blast’
email marketing
.
Changing the name now gives the company a genuine
opportunity to explain all the stuff we’ve built over the years,”
added
Tink.

With a deep dive into dotdigital Engagement Cloud, the omnichannel customer engagement platform, he also touched on key findings from the annual report, Hitting the Mark Australia 2018.

MagentoLive took place at ICC Sydney with a keynote session from Mark Lavelle, CEO at Magento, an Adobe Company, providing an update on the growing momentum of Magento – a platform to connect with existing and potential customers. MagentoLive provided an opportunity to witness and discover new developments in the world of digital commerce and the Magento ecosystem in the APAC region.

Accolade Wines sees an exponential growth with dotdigital

With an increasing number of Australian brands adopting basic marketing automation, we had our very own Amy Goodsell, Business Development Manager at Accolade Wines, highlight the brand’s transformative experience with dotdigital.

Amy speaks about Accolade Wines’ marketing automation success story:

As our customer database grew over time, we were worried about the workload on each of our consumer team members. It was clear that in order to achieve our growth aspirations, we needed a scalable model to simplify the insanely complex business model and recreate a more personalized experience for our customers. We had no idea at that time, but what we needed was dotdigital.

Amy presenting at MagentoLive Australia 2019

A celebration to a promising year ahead

The annual pre-MagentoLive dinner, with exclusive invite-only, was a great way to settle into the conference. Hosted by Peter Sheldon, Senior Director Strategy at Magento, an Adobe Company, and Tink Taylor, Founder and President of dotdigital, it was a relaxed evening at Australia’s most awarded fine dining steak restaurant, Prime.

All good things must come to an end…after the afterparty

For the third year in a row, dotdigital has sponsored the MagentoLive afterparty and it has become one of the must-do events after the conference. We would like to say a massive thank you to the additional sponsors as it was a pleasure to stand alongside Braintree, Netstarter, and Shippit for the MagentoLive after party at the Watershed Hotel!

Here’s to an exciting year ahead for dotdigital’s operation Down Under!

Follow in the footsteps of Accolate Wines, and start your journey to marketing automation success: book a demo here.

The post dotdigital at MagentoLive Australia 2019 appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 5 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Vanessa Vallely OBE

Since 2008, Vanessa has been bestowing her business tips and advice on audiences – leaving them inspired and motivated. And, this year, she’ll be joining the amazing panel of speakers in our first-ever personal development track.

In anticipation of International Women’s Day on Friday 8 March, we could think of no one better to catch up with than Vanessa.

Can you tell us a little about your background? Where you’ve come from, where you’ve worked, how you got to where you are today?

I grew up in Hackney, East London. I left school at
16 with an ambition to land myself a job in Banking in the city. Academically,
I didn’t do too well at school, as there were other things going on in my life
at the time. I managed to scrape a few C’s grades in terms of my GCSE’s, but it
certainly wasn’t reflective of what I could have got if things were different
and I would have been able to get my head down to study. I managed to get my
first job in a bank, which I subsequently lost after six months! At the time, I
thought the world was over! My early career taught me a lot of lessons from a
very early age, which on reflection was an invaluable education for the more
senior roles I would eventually go on to take. What followed was over 25
different job positions across nine financial organisations up to Chief Operating
Officer. I left the corporate world to pursue my passion to help to progress
the careers of women through my company, WeAreTheCity.  I am now CEO of two businesses, I sit on a
couple of boards and was recently awarded an OBE from Prince Charles for my services
to women and the economy.

What inspired you to get involved with gender equality and motivational speaking?

Definitely the lack of
women at senior levels within the organisations I worked for. I was often the
only woman at my organisations’ leadership table. Outside of my day job, in
2008, I set up WeAreTheCity to help women progress in their careers. It was
more of a hobby than a commercial business. I was frustrated as there was lots
of different activities going on for women who wanted to upskill but they were
spread all over the internet. I wanted to create a website that provided
resources and inspiration for women who were looking to progress. It was
actually my husband that pushed me to make WeAreTheCity a reality, as opposed
to a dream, as he bought me the website domain and built the website. We both
ran WeAreTheCity alongside our day jobs for six years before I finally plucked
up the courage to leave corporate and run WeAreTheCity full time. When I left,
we had a community of around 24,000 women and two corporate clients. Today we
have 120,000 members and we help over 120 companies to attract, retain and
develop female talent.

WeAreTheCity is now the one-stop-shop of information
and resources for professional women that I dreamed it would one day be. We
publish news that interests women and resources such as networks and events
where women can learn new skills. We also promote the activities of other
organisations who are running initiatives, programmes and events aiding female
progression and development.  Aside from
the website, we run over 15 learning events a year, two conferences for future
leaders
and technologists.
WeAreTheCity runs our annual Rising Star awards and TechWomen100
awards. We have a job board for clients
looking to attract female applicants, Gender Networks, which is a forum
and network for women running networks inside their firms, as well as a Careers Club
for women who want to really accelerate their career. We also generate various
different pieces of research each year, all focused on Gender.

Do you have a favourite experience from your career?

Like many careers,
there were high’s like promotions and there were low’s, like being passed over
for promotion. I think the best and most scary experience was actually leaving
corporate.

I thought when I left corporate,
given 25 years of experience that I would naturally have all the skills I
needed to set up and run a successful business. 
I was wrong!  It has taken me a
good five years to feel comfortable about Vanessa as a leader of her own
business as opposed to Vanessa as a corporate worker.

The highlight has to be when my
accountant told me the business had started to make a profit! It makes all the
hard work, sweat and tears worthwhile.

Other highlights include seeing
our Rising Star and TechWomen100 awards go from strength to strength. To think
what we do at WeAreTheCity has contributed in some small way to their ongoing
success is a truly amazing feeling. 

 What do you think the audience will gain from your talk?

My talk will
definitely provide the audience with food for thought as to how they can drive
their own careers. Their success is not just down to their line managers, it
has to come from them. Aside from sharing my own story, I will also share the
five component things that I believe accelerated my career. We will cover the
imposter syndrome, personal brand, networking, their digital footprint and the
importance of mentors and sponsors.  It
will be fast paced given the 20 minutes, however I can guarantee they will
leave inspired.

What are 3 top tips for success?

  1. Network to get work
  2. Your personal brand matters – be wary of the behaviours you exhibit
  3. Your personal brand matters – be wary of the behaviours you exhibit

What has been your biggest challenge during your career?

I spent the first half
of my career convincing people to give me a chance. Often I didn’t have the
backstory they wanted, the accent, the academic qualifications etc.  It took a long time for my voice to be heard,
but I never gave up.  If you want
something in life, you have to work for it. 
You will need people around you to open up doors of opportunity (see
tips above) and above all be resilient and tenacious. Another challenge came
when I had children, I was wrapped up in a world of guilt of being ambitious
and also wanting to be the best mum I could be. I did what I thought was best
at the time, there is no book written that can guide you on that one. You have
to make your own decisions.  My kids
still talk to me, so it couldn’t have been that bad!

What influential female figures have been the most inspiring to you and your career?

I have many role models, Tamara
Box at Reed Smith and my own mentor, Lara Morgan, as I deeply admire her
tenacity and drive. From a tech perspective, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Professor
Sue Black OBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and Christina Scott, of News UK.  All of these are in senior tech roles and
continuously work to inspire other women. 
I also greatly admire Amanda McKenzie OBE, previous CMO at Aviva, was
heavily involved with WACL and now CEO at Business in the Community.  I have other women in what I like to call my
personal boardroom (see book by Zella King).  These are women I confide in on a weekly
basis, they know me, they get me and are not afraid to tell me if my idea won’t
work!

In your opinion, what is the largest barrier to women at work and how can it be overcome?

I have a bit of a thing about the
word barriers!  We can all say there are
barriers, things stopping us doing this, doing that etc, however it is how we
overcome our perceptions of those barriers that we need to focus on.  There are still a number of industries where
there are lots of women at the top, but no room for the next generations to
move in to their positions. These senior women should be clearing paths for
their future leaders and offering mentoring and sponsorship.  There are also a number of industries that
are still male dominated, and yes if the culture is stuck in the dark ages,
that can be hard.  However, if bad
behaviour is stopping you progressing, you need to call that out.   Often, and without generalising for every
woman, we are put off by a set of characteristics that we believe are needed
for certain roles.  We have to challenge
our thinking, disrupt the perception and take a risk.  We can bring our own unique style to any
role.  Sometimes the biggest barrier is
actually ourselves.  Ask yourself the
question, what is really holding me back! If it’s the firm you are in and its
culture, then make the move and go somewhere where your talents are both
appreciated and nurtured!

What piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

To just chill a little bit and
appreciate that things often take time. I was very ambitious when I was younger
and expected to climb mountains in months instead of years.  I would also advise myself not to beat myself
up to hard for the mistakes I made. These were not actually mistakes, they were
opportunities to learn and grow and that I wouldn’t always get things right!

And if you could meet any woman from history, who would it be?

It would have to be Oprah Winfrey and Michelle Obama.


Spaces are limited! Don’t miss out on your chance to learn, grow and get inspired at this year’s dotdigital Summit. Get your tickets today.

The post dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Vanessa Vallely OBE appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 5 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

14 SEO Predictions for 2019 & Beyond, as Told by Mozzers

Posted by TheMozTeam

With the new year in full swing and an already busy first quarter, our 2019 predictions for SEO in the new year are hopping onto the scene a little late — but fashionably so, we hope. From an explosion of SERP features to increased monetization to the key drivers of search this year, our SEO experts have consulted their crystal balls (read: access to mountains of data and in-depth analyses) and made their predictions. Read on for an exhaustive list of fourteen things to watch out for in search from our very own Dr. Pete, Britney Muller, Rob Bucci, Russ Jones, and Miriam Ellis!

1. Answers will drive search

People Also Ask boxes exploded in 2018, and featured snippets have expanded into both multifaceted and multi-snippet versions. Google wants to answer questions, it wants to answer them across as many devices as possible, and it will reward sites with succinct, well-structured answers. Focus on answers that naturally leave visitors wanting more and establish your brand and credibility. [Dr. Peter J. Meyers]

Further reading:

2. Voice search will continue to be utterly useless for optimization

Optimizing for voice search will still be no more than optimizing for featured snippets, and conversions from voice will remain a dark box. [Russ Jones]

Further reading:

3. Mobile is table stakes

This is barely a prediction. If your 2019 plan is to finally figure out mobile, you’re already too late. Almost all Google features are designed with mobile-first in mind, and the mobile-first index has expanded rapidly in the past few months. Get your mobile house (not to be confused with your mobile home) in order as soon as you can. [Dr. Peter J. Meyers]

Further reading:

4. Further SERP feature intrusions in organic search

Expect Google to find more and more ways to replace organic with solutions that keep users on Google’s property. This includes interactive SERP features that replace, slowly but surely, many website offerings in the same way that live scores, weather, and flights have. [Russ Jones]

Further reading:

5. Video will dominate niches

Featured Videos, Video Carousels, and Suggested Clips (where Google targets specific content in a video) are taking over the how-to spaces. As Google tests search appliances with screens, including Home Hub, expect video to dominate instructional and DIY niches. [Dr. Peter J. Meyers]

Further reading:

6. SERPs will become more interactive

We’ve seen the start of interactive SERPs with People Also Ask Boxes. Depending on which question you expand, two to three new questions will generate below that directly pertain to your expanded question. This real-time engagement keeps people on the SERP longer and helps Google better understand what a user is seeking. [Britney Muller]

Further reading:

7. Local SEO: Google will continue getting up in your business — literally

Google will continue asking more and more intimate questions about your business to your customers. Does this business have gender-neutral bathrooms? Is this business accessible? What is the atmosphere like? How clean is it? What kind of lighting do they have? And so on. If Google can acquire accurate, real-world information about your business (your percentage of repeat customers via geocaching, price via transaction history, etc.) they can rely less heavily on website signals and provide more accurate results to searchers. [Britney Muller]

Further reading:

8. Business proximity-to-searcher will remain a top local ranking factor

In Moz’s recent State of Local SEO report, the majority of respondents agreed that Google’s focus on the proximity of a searcher to local businesses frequently emphasizes distance over quality in the local SERPs. I predict that we’ll continue to see this heavily weighting the results in 2019. On the one hand, hyper-localized results can be positive, as they allow a diversity of businesses to shine for a given search. On the other hand, with the exception of urgent situations, most people would prefer to see best options rather than just closest ones. [Miriam Ellis]

Further reading:

9. Local SEO: Google is going to increase monetization

Look to see more of the local and maps space monetized uniquely by Google both through Adwords and potentially new lead-gen models. This space will become more and more competitive. [Russ Jones]

Further reading:

10. Monetization tests for voice

Google and Amazon have been moving towards voice-supported displays in hopes of better monetizing voice. It will be interesting to see their efforts to get displays in homes and how they integrate the display advertising. Bold prediction: Amazon will provide sleep-mode display ads similar to how Kindle currently displays them today. [Britney Muller]

11. Marketers will place a greater focus on the SERPs

I expect we’ll see a greater focus on the analysis of SERPs as Google does more to give people answers without them having to leave the search results. We’re seeing more and more vertical search engines like Google Jobs, Google Flights, Google Hotels, Google Shopping. We’re also seeing more in-depth content make it onto the SERP than ever in the form of featured snippets, People Also Ask boxes, and more. With these new developments, marketers are increasingly going to want to report on their general brand visibility within the SERPs, not just their website ranking. It’s going to be more important than ever for people to be measuring all the elements within a SERP, not just their own ranking. [Rob Bucci]

Further reading:

12. Targeting topics will be more productive than targeting queries

2019 is going to be another year in which we see the emphasis on individual search queries start to decline, as people focus more on clusters of queries around topics. People Also Ask queries have made the importance of topics much more obvious to the SEO industry. With PAAs, Google is clearly illustrating that they think about searcher experience in terms of a searcher’s satisfaction across an entire topic, not just a specific search query. With this in mind, we can expect SEOs to more and more want to see their search queries clustered into topics so they can measure their visibility and the competitive landscape across these clusters. [Rob Bucci]

Further reading:

13. Linked unstructured citations will receive increasing focus

I recently conducted a small study in which there was a 75% correlation between organic and local pack rank. Linked unstructured citations (the mention of partial or complete business information + a link on any type of relevant website) are a means of improving organic rankings which underpin local rankings. They can also serve as a non-Google dependent means of driving traffic and leads. Anything you’re not having to pay Google for will become increasingly precious. Structured citations on key local business listing platforms will remain table stakes, but competitive local businesses will need to focus on unstructured data to move the needle. [Miriam Ellis]

Further reading:

14. Reviews will remain a competitive difference-maker

A Google rep recently stated that about one-third of local searches are made with the intent of reading reviews. This is huge. Local businesses that acquire and maintain a good and interactive reputation on the web will have a critical advantage over brands that ignore reviews as fundamental to customer service. Competitive local businesses will earn, monitor, respond to, and analyze the sentiment of their review corpus. [Miriam Ellis]

Further reading:

We’ve heard from Mozzers, and now we want to hear from you. What have you seen so far in 2019 that’s got your SEO Spidey senses tingling? What trends are you capitalizing on and planning for? Let us know in the comments below (and brag to friends and colleagues when your prediction comes true in the next 6–10 months). 😉

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 5 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Cate Murden

Cate Murden PUSH

The complex and ever-changing world we live in isn’t only impacting our ability to engage with our customers, it’s also having a significant effect on our lives at work. As a result, stress and stress-related illnesses are hugely on the rise.

Cate Murden, founder of PUSH Body and Mind, has been
affected by this, just like so many of us. During her talk, Cate will be
breaking down the importance of putting yourself first, and sharing with you,
the tools she used to improve her energy levels and shift into a positive
mind-set.

We sat down with her to discover a little bit more.

Hi Cate, can you tell us a bit more about what PUSH is?

PUSH Mind
and Body is a business consultancy grounded in human behavior. We answer
business problems with people-focused solutions and, consequently, help people,
teams and companies to work better.

What made you decided to start this new business?

After a
16-year career in media, I was signed off with stress. Having survived this,
frankly, awful period, I realized that I wanted to help ensure that no one else
went through what had happened. And, so, the concept for PUSH was formed – from
a genuine desire to help busy professionals live and work better.

Can you tell us about a favorite moment from your career?

We
created and curated an event in August last year supporting mental health and
resilience in the workplace. It was an incredibly sunny day and we were in a
rooftop venue with four unbelievable speakers and over 150 guests. It was an
amazingly powerful moment – firstly in what we were starting to achieve with
our vision and mission and, secondly, how far we had come as a business.

What are the biggest work goals you’re currently working towards?

What we
really want is to help companies realize that their people are their most
unique differentiator and yet, currently, corporate culture is slowly breaking
them.

We HAVE
to change this before more of the unthinkable happens and, you know what? That
means more successful companies and happier people. It’s really not that hard.

During your talk building resilience in the 20th century – what do you think the audience will gain from your talk?

I really
hope people leave my talk realizing they’re the most important people in their
worlds. And, hopefully, I can give them some valuable advice in how to be the
very best they can be.

What are your three top tips for success?

  1. Get a coach
  2. Start everyday with exercise
  3. Never accept no

What has been your biggest challenge over the last year?

My own
brain

Who or what inspires you most?

My partner. He inspires me, challenges me and helps me grow (and regularly drives me nuts too).

If you could predict one thing for the future what would it be?

The
fallout from Brexit is going to be really sh*t for everyone.

What advice would you want to give to your younger self?

Stop f*cking worrying – it’s always okay in the end.


Join Cate Murden for her personal development breakout session at the dotdigital Summit on Wednesday 20 March. Not got your tickets yet? Get them today.

The post dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Cate Murden appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 5 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Richard Pacitti

As
part of our personal development track at the Summit this year, we will be
discussing many of these issues. Our speakers will be diving in deep and
showing us how to overcome and thrive in today’s complicated world.

We sat down with Richard Pacitti, Chief Executive of Mind in Croydon. Richard will be helping us embrace change and giving us the power to start meaningful conversations about mental health.

What do you think are the main things we need to think about when talking about mental health in the workplace?

It’s important that we understand a bit about mental health problems, and how we can notice them within ourselves and our colleagues. We need to understand simple things that we can do to create mentally healthy workplace and how we let our staff and colleagues know that it’s okay to talk about difficulties that they might be having.

What are your key tips on getting a healthy work/life balance?

The best thing you can do to make sure you’re getting a healthy work/life balance is to turn your work devices off when you’re not at work. The more you let work encroach on your private life, the less healthy the balance becomes.

What advice would give someone who is experiencing mental health problems, but cannot or does not want to talk about it to people at work?

Firstly, mental
health problems are really common. One in four people will experience a problem
at some time in their life. You might feel embarrassed or ashamed, but there is
absolutely no need to.

You might think that talking doesn’t help, but all the evidence points to the contrary – taking to other people can be really helpful. You’ll probably find that your employer will be understanding and very helpful. And don’t forget, you can always talk to people outside of work. Friends, family or even people you don’t know and have never met. There are so many helplines out there, designed precisely for that reason.

What would you like people to take away from your talk?

As well as some general information about mental health problems, I would like people to leave my session with a good understanding of how to promote good mental health, not just at work, but in life in general.

I
also want people to start thinking deeper about the role that technology plays both
at work, and in relation to our mental health and wellbeing. If you can make
yourself aware of its effect on you, you can act to stop it before it damages
your health.

Who or what inspires you most?

I get a lot of inspiration from great musician and songwriters, but I also find that just getting outside for a walk can inspire me. Especially near big, green spaces. I find that very inspirational.

If you could predict one thing for the future what would it be?

It’s less of a prediction, and more of a hope. If we’re going to remain sane, we need to spend more time with real people, and real things, and less time connected to our gadgets.

What piece of advice to your younger self?

Have the courage of your convictions.


Join Richard Pacitti for his personal development breakout session at the dotdigital Summit on Wednesday 20 March. Not got your tickets yet? Get them today.

The post dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Richard Pacitti appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 6 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Adam Baylis

Adam Baylis

At the dotdigital
Summit 2019, we’ll be hosting breakout sessions hearing from Marketers who are
blowing us away with their outstanding customer engagements, including Adam
Baylis, Group CRM & Insights Manager at The Jockey Club.

We sat down with Adam to get an exclusive insight into how they’re listening to customers and talking to them on channels that resonate.

Adam, can you give us some background about The Jockey Club and your role?

The Jockey Club,
established in 1750, stages thrilling sporting occasions including the Randox
Health Grand National, The Cheltenham Festival presented by Magners and The
Investec Derby.

As one of the UK’s
leading leisure companies we also play host to some of the biggest names in
music at our The Jockey Club Live events. This year we’re looking forward to
welcoming the likes of Madness, Jess Glynne and – rather appropriately – dotdigital
Summit headline speaker, Nile Rodgers.

My role as Group CRM & Insights Manager sits within the wider Group Marketing team at The Jockey Club. We support the marketing teams in each of the four ‘regions’ that encompass our 15 racecourses.

What has been your biggest challenge over the past year?

Outdoor events are
a massive part of the tourism, hospitality and leisure industry. Going to the
races is usually a big part of that for a lot of people. It’s a chance to get
outside, get some sunshine and generally have some fun.

But, with the
never-ending heatwave last year, and the unexpected success of the England
football team in the FIFA World Cup, we found ourselves facing some stiff
competition for people’s time.

This was a challenge
for the whole of the tourism, hospitality and leisure industry, not just us at
The Jockey Club.

The knock-on effect
of this was that, as summer drew to a close, we had to discover new ways to
connect and engage with our customers again.

How did you go about overcoming this challenge?

With 15 courses
around the country, we needed to make sure we weren’t adopting a
‘one-size-fits-all’ approach. We needed to apply our group tone-of-voice in an
appropriate manner in order to reconnect with our audience, particularly the
local communities near to our courses.  

This is especially important
for us, because in a single region, like the North-West, we have three courses
– Aintree, Carlisle and Haydock – which are all about three hours apart. There
isn’t as big an overlap among their audiences as we see at some of our London
courses – so maintaining strong relationships with our local communities is vital.

We knew we needed
to find a new, powerful channel that could deliver close and personal messages.

What do you think customers will gain from your talk?

I hope people leave
my talk excited to try the new channels that are ready and waiting for
marketers to tap into.

I think it’s really
important that we try and experiment with different channels to discover what
works for different audiences.

With the complexity
of the modern world there is a vital need for marketers to be nimble. We’re
never talking to one single audience. Every audience has groups within it that
will respond in different ways to different channels. For example, for us, the audiences
at Haydock racecourse responded really strongly to SMS.

If someone’s main
touchpoint with your brand is through your app, then speak to them on your app.
If they interact with your SMS, talk to them there.

We’ve worked hard
to understand our audiences and discover more effective and dynamic ways to
engage them and I hope people leave my session planning to do the same.

What are your plans for the future?

We go into
everything we do open to every opportunity.

One thing that we will
continue to be committed to is understanding what works for audiences. Today,
there are so many channels, that connections are made on an individual level.
What channels work best can’t be narrowed down to demographics or age ranges,
and this is what we plan to explore in the future.

At this point, it is impossible to get away from mobile messaging. It’s just sitting there, in the customers pocket. We need to figure out which channels work and target those segments accordingly. Whether that’s SMS, WhatsApp, or push, it’s all about going where the customer wants you.


Join Adam Baylis for his breakout session at the dotdigital Summit on Wednesday 20 March. Not got your tickets yet? Get them today.

The post dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Adam Baylis appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 6 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Mark Roberts

Ahead of the 2019 dotdigital Summit, we sat down with Mark Roberts, co-founder of Beer Hawk. Leading the charge of our ‘brilliant fundamentals’ breakout sessions, we wanted to know a little bit more about Mark, where he’s come from and get a little insight into the wisdom he’ll be sharing at the Summit.

Mark Roberts, Co-founder of Beer Hawk

So, you and Chris France founded Beer Hawk around 6 years ago, what were you doing before then?

After I graduated in 2000, I joined the Grad team
at Procter & Gamble. After working there in various sales & marketing
roles for 5 years, I moved into consultancy where I specialized in marketing
and innovation, advising brands such as Coca-Cola and Kimberly Clark, before
moving into the finance industry around the time of the financial crisis. Great
timing! During my time at HBOS and then Lloyds Banking Group, I was involved in
a number of different areas including innovation, existing customers and customer
marketing.

It was during my time as Marketing Director at Laithwaite’s Wine that I got the inspiration to start Beer Hawk. Not satisfied with the beer offerings of the supermarkets, there was a growing demand for unknown and undiscovered craft beer brands. With so many small, amazing craft breweries out there, I couldn’t understand why there wasn’t a similar offering to Laithwaites, but for beer drinkers. So that’s what I did.

And why were you interested in marketing in the first place?

My interest in marketing is two-fold. Generally,
I’ve always been interested in psychology and in particular the psychology
behind consumer behavior. The other side that really interests me is the way great
consumer brands make things, especially the new and adaptive ways they innovate.

Could you explain what your job entails?

It’s a good question, as one of the things I like
to do is continually try to make myself redundant, by hiring better people than
me!  I always find up with something new
to do!  At Beer Hawk, I now look after
all our Marketing, B2B Sales, Product, Tech and Finance.  My business partner, Chris, looks after our
Customer Service, Operations and Buying teams. On a day to day basis, I really
spend my time thinking about our People, how are team is working, and the big
strategic things that we need to do differently.

Do you have a favorite experience from your career so far, I know you’ve won quite a few awards so that might be quite difficult for you to choose?

It is. It’s a really difficult question, but if I
had to choose something, it would be the moment someone really credible
promoted our brand for the first time.

In six weeks, Chris and I had taken Beer Hawk from
an idea, to a fully functioning website selling craft beers from around the
world. We were using social media, door drops and visiting product fairs to
spread the word about our new business. We were doing well, but we knew we
needed someone with a significant customer base to give us a much-needed boost.

And that was when we signed a deal with East Coast
Main Line trains (now LNER). As part of their rewards scheme, the train line
offered deals and discounts to customers who racked up points with every
journey – and Beer Hawk was now part of it.

I still remember the day they announced that we
were part of their rewards scheme. Chris and I had sold our cars to finance the
business, so we were walking back home from our (very small!) office. At this
time, we were still getting personal notifications every time an order was
placed, and we were lucky to get ten of these a day. So, you can imagine our
surprise when our phones started going crazy in our pockets.

East Coast’s email had gone out, and orders were
flooding in. Our feelings quickly changed from “cool, new orders”, to elation,
before dropping to dread. There were too many orders! How were we supposed to
fulfil these orders? Would we even be able to?!

We didn’t have enough beer, packaging or people. But that wasn’t going to stop us, because if that moment showed us anything, it was that we were really onto something. We were offering something that people really wanted.

What are your biggest work goals currently?

The accelerated speed of Beer Hawk has massively
increased the complexity of the environs we’re working in. Our customers are
very different, there’s no single persona we can tailor our marketing to. We
don’t just sell craft beers, but we offer gifts, homebrew kits, and draft beer
appliances. We’re operating in the B2C, B2B markets and we’re planning on
opening our first omnichannel bar experience. And our rapid growth has led to
our workforce expanding and becoming increasingly diverse and varied.

I want the audience to leave our talk understanding that it’s still possible to grow and expand, no matter the complexities. I want them to leave thinking, not of the struggle complexity presents, but the amazing opportunities it holds in store and the amazing innovations just waiting to be discovered.

What are 3 top tips for success?

  1. Know what you want to do. Have a clear purpose and goals about something your passionate about, because it would be rubbish to be successful in something you’re not passionate about.
  2. Surround yourself with brilliant people. Better yet, surround yourself with brilliant people who compliment your strengths, and, more importantly, your weaknesses. Teamwork is everything behind success. Nobody is perfect, and you will need people who challenge you if you really want to be successful.
  3. Belief. Have massive belief in yourself, in your team and in what you’re doing. Success is never simple; the road is never smooth. You will experience so many setbacks and moments where you will feel like you can’t do it, that, without belief and belief in what you do, you never will.

What has been your biggest challenge over the last year?

Beer Hawk is still an incredibly young business,
and over the past year, we’ve been experiencing some specific growing pains
about being such a fast-growing business.

Our first employee joined the company 5 years ago. Our latest employee joined 5 weeks ago. We now have over 80 employees and continue to expand. Making sure everyone knew what they were doing, and how to communicate across teams is essential. For a long time, we had just enough processes in place to stop from falling over. Managing these growing pains was one of our biggest challenges over the last year.

What piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

I would tell myself to start earlier, younger. I always knew that I wanted to start my own business, but I held myself back for years. I would tell myself to go into the ‘doing’ stage sooner.  

And finally, we have to know, what is your favorite beer?

Well, that all depends on where I am, what mood I’m
in and what time of year it is!

My favorite ever beer would probably be a Scheider Weisse Eisbock, sat in the amazing Schneider Brauhaus in Munich. But that’s not a beer I would enjoy on a hot summer’s day. For that I would probably prefer a cold, crisp IPA, like a Goose Island.


Join Mark Roberts for his breakout session at the dotdigital Summit on Wednesday 20 March. Not got your tickets yet?

Get them now.

The post dotdigital Summit 2019: an interview with Mark Roberts appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 6 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

Music legend, Nile Rodgers, joins the 2019 Summit

Nile Rodgers Summit

Not a stranger to complex situations, Nile was born in New
York to his 14-year-old mother, Beverley Goodman, and father Nile Rodgers Sr.
who worked for the John Glanzrock who would later become his white and Jewish
stepfather. Growing up, his life was anything but smooth-sailing, but it was
also the making of him.

An incredibly skilled musician, his own band, CHIC, was
catapulted into the pop charts in at the beginning of the disco movement and
changed the face of pop music forever. Unable to keep his talent from the
world, Rodgers and CHIC co-founder, Bernard Edwards, established CHIC
Organization Ltd. for the music they produced within CHIC for artists outside
of the group.

With over 200 production credits to his name, including Let’s Dance by David Bowie, Notorious by Duran Duran and Like a Virgin by Madonna, his work has
sold over 200 million albums and 50 million singles worldwide. Having worked
with artists such as Diana Ross, Sister Sledge, INXS, Debbie Harry, Avicii and
Sam Smith (to name just a few) you’ve undoubtedly heard this maestro at work.

To complement his work in the music industry, Rodgers has
scored soundtracks for a number of Hollywood blockbusters including Coming to
America, White Hot, Thelma and Louise, and Beverly Hill Cops III to name a few.

Aside from his insanely successful career, Nile has had to
overcome his fair share of personal obstacles. From addiction to cancer, there’s
nothing that can hold him back. Since his first gig when he was 19-years-old to
today, Rodgers has only missed two performances in his 47-year career.  

Nile Rogers continues to be a force for unity around the
world through his music and humanitarian work. He was one of 75 acts to perform
at Live Aid and released a unifying re-recording of We Are Family with over 200 musicians and celebrities in response to
the tragedies on 9/11. His We Are Family Foundation (WAFF) is dedicated to the
vision of creating a global family through programs that promote cultural
diversity while nurturing the vision, talents, and ideas of young people who
are changing the world.

This article has barely scratched the surface of the
extraordinary life of Grammy-winning composer, producer and guitarist, Nile
Rodgers.

Join us and Nile on 20 March to learn more. Haven’t got your tickets yet?

Get them today.

The post Music legend, Nile Rodgers, joins the 2019 Summit appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 6 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com