GDPR – 12 months to go, 12 things to think about (Part 4 of 4)

In Part 1 we covered raising awareness, data audits and privacy notices. While in Part 2 we covered how GDPR deals with individuals’ rights including subject access requests and legal basis. In the last instalment, we reviewed consent, marketing to children and data breaches. The last three things to think about are data protection impact assessments, data protection officers and international considerations.

10. Data Protection Impact Assessments

It has always been best practice to take a privacy-by-design approach when developing your data capture and processing strategies, as well as a key part of any technology implementation. Privacy impact assessments are fundamental to this approach by giving marketers a useful tool to consider properly the privacy risks that their data processing entails. All the GDPR does here is make privacy by design an express legal requirement and makes PIAs (renamed in the regulations as Data Protection Impact Assessment or DPIA) a requirement under certain circumstances where the data processing is likely to result in high risk to the data subjects such as:

  • where new technology is being deployed
  • where a processing activity is likely to significantly impact individuals
  • where there is large-scale processing on special categories of data

For most marketers, it will be the first two circumstances that will be most likely to trigger a DPIA but it is important to know the special categories of data if appropriate in the future.

In many if not most situations, the DPIA will indicate that the processing of the data is not high risk or if it is high risk, you will be able to address those risks. If you cannot mitigate the risk, you should contact the ICO for guidance on whether processing the data will comply with GDPR.

If you haven’t already, you should start to asses if any DPIAs are warranted within your organisation, who will lead them and who else needs to be involved. There is great guidance published by both the UK ICO and the Article 29 Working Party on DPIAs and privacy by design.

11. Data Protection Officers

US President Harry S. Truman had a sign on his desk that read “the buck stops here.” It was his assurance that he was ultimately responsible for how the government operated under his administration. Historically when it comes to data, the buck has not stopped anywhere due to the way that the collection and processing of data has grown organically within businesses and other organisations. I was speaking with one head of CRM recently who told me of the over 80 marketing databases that they currently have. It is going to come down to this CRM manager to get all of that data into a single place.

Every organisation should designate someone to “take the data buck” – to be ultimately responsible for data privacy and compliance. You should also have a think about where this role of Data Protection Officer (DPO) sits within the organisation and overall governance structures so that the person in this role has the freedom to act, should the need arise. In many instances, the GDPR has overcome this by specifying situations where a DPO is required such as:

  • public authorities
  • organisations that carry out large scale, regular and systematic monitoring of individuals
  • organisations that carry out large scale processing of special categories of data

Whomever the designated DPO, it is important that they have the knowledge, support and authority to carry out their role effectively. The article 29 working party has some good guidance on roles and responsibilities of a DPO.

12. International Considerations

The first thing to remember here is that Brexit will have little to no impact on GDPR. The government has confirmed on multiple occasions including as recently as the Queen’s Speech on 21st of June 2017, that GDPR will be the data protection law in the UK going forward. Moreover, the UK will still be an EU member when the law goes into effect on the 25th of May 2018.

If you operate in multiple EU member states, then you should determine which would be your lead data regulator. This is not meant to be a way to be under the auspices of the most favourable regulator. Your lead regulator should be the state where your central administration in the EU is based or the location where decisions about your data processing are taken. You can do this by mapping out where you take your data processing decisions and the country with the preponderance of those decisions is the one you should choose. If on the other hand you are not engaged in any cross border data processing, then your decision here is quite straightforward. Once again, the Article 29 Working Party has produced some guidance that will help you make the correct decision.

Conclusion

As I said at the beginning of part 1, data recently released by the DMA indicates that marketers are feeling less prepared for GDPR than they did in February. Marketers are also feeling less knowledgeable about GDPR in general and their four big concerns are:

  1. Consent
  2. Legacy Data
  3. Implementing a compliant system
  4. Profiling

I hope that this blog series has gone a little way to making you feel more prepared or at least has given you some things to think about and some things to start discussing internally. Over the coming weeks and months, dotmailer will be publishing useful guidance from recognised sources geared towards email marketers. Our approach is to keep our readers up to speed based on facts directly from this reputable guidance or vetted by the UK or other data regulators around Europe. In addition, our teams will be ready to help you implement the advice you receive from your professional advisors within the dotmailer environment.

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Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

GDPR – 12 months to go, 12 things to think about (Part 3 of 4)

In Part 1 we covered raising awareness, data audits and privacy notices. While in Part 2 we covered how GDPR deals with individuals’ rights including subject access requests and legal basis. In this week’s installment, we will be reviewing consent, marketing to children and data breaches.

7. Consent

Under the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations, email marketing is consent-based. GDPR however, more fully defines how to get consent with the following stipulations:

  • Must be freely given – giving people genuine choice and control over how you use their data and “unbundling” consent from other terms and conditions; in other words, consent cannot be a precondition for a service unless it necessary to deliver the service.
  • Specific – clearly explain exactly what people are consenting to in a way they can easily understand (i.e. not with a load of legal mumbo jumbo) and in a way that does not disrupt the user experience.
  • Informed – clearly identify yourself as the data controller, identify each processing operation you will be performing, collect separate consent for each unless this would be “unduly disruptive or confusing”, describe the reason behind each data processing operation, and notify people of their right to withdraw consent at any time.
  • Unambiguous – it must be clear that the person has consented and what they have consented to with an affirmative action (i.e. no pre-checked boxes). Therefore, silence would not be a valid form of consent.

In the last instalment, we talked about deciding on the legal basis you will use to process your marketing data. Consent is not your only option. That said, it is always a good idea to know the source of all of your data, how that data flows through your various systems and what consent you have for the processing of that data. The ICO has published detailed guidance on consent and has produced a consent checklist to help you review your current practices.

8. Children

For the first time, the GDPR specifically calls out the rights of children and offers special protection for their personal data in the digital world. If you offer what the GDPR calls “information society services” to children and you rely on consent to process their data, you may have to get the permission of the parent or guardian before processing that child’s data. The GDPR set the age at which a child can consent for themselves at 16 but the UK may lower this to 13. One interesting thing to note is that the parent or guardian’s consent expires when the child reaches the age at which they can give consent, so you will have to refresh their consent at that milestone.

9. Data Breaches

The GDPR makes it the responsibility of all organisations to issue notifications for certain types of data breaches. You will have to notify the ICO if the breach is likely to impinge on the rights and freedoms of individuals such as financial loss, loss of confidentiality or significant economic or social harm. If this risk is high you may also have to notify the individual directly. Now is the time to think about your policies and procedures for identifying and managing data breaches.

So far, we have given you a lot to think about and we hope you have gotten started. Check back next soon for our last instalment where we will look at privacy by design, data protection officers and international considerations.

The post GDPR – 12 months to go, 12 things to think about (Part 3 of 4) appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

GDPR – 12 months to go, 12 things to think about (Part 2 of 4)

In Part 1, we covered raising awareness, data audits and privacy notices.

4.    Individuals’ Rights

Just ‘getting ready’ for GDPR is not going to be good enough because you may also have to prove to the regulator that you are ready for GDPR. One critical proof point will be the decisions you make in getting ready for GDPR, as well as what you will do going forward after its implementation. Get in the habit now of documenting all of your decisions and the deliberations that went into them (more on this under the Protection by Design section). You will also have clearly defined and documented policies and procedures to comply with GDPR. These cannot be the kind of documents that are written and then live in a cupboard just in case something goes wrong, but rather they need to be distributed to staff in a useful format with comparable training so that the processes become habit within your organisation.

One area that is very well suited to this is protecting individuals’ rights. Most of the rights under GDPR are not that different than under the DPA, but now is a good time to ensure that you have your documentation in order. It is also a good time to ensure that your procedures will be compliant around things like correcting data and subject access requests.

5.    Subject Access Requests

While we are on the topic of Subject Access requests, these are changing under GDPR. First, the down side; you will no longer be able to charge for these and you will have to reply within 30 rather than 40 days. You will also have to provide some metadata along with the data subject’s own data, such as your data retention periods and many of the other things covered under the notices provision.

The good news is that you can charge for or refuse excessive requests (too frequent) and you can ask the data subject to specify the data they are looking for if you process large amounts of data. You will also be able to provide the data electronically in many cases.

6.    Legal Basis

Under the GDPR, the legal basis for processing data is all-important because individuals’ rights can change depending on the legal basis you determine for processing the data. It will be important for businesses to balance the requirements of consent and the legitimate interests that the GDPR provides for. The other legal basis that many email marketers will rely on is processing the data with the subject’s consent.

That puts us half way through the twelve things you should be thinking about to prepare for GDPR. Check back soon for the next two installments.

Editor’s note: The materials and information above is not intended to convey or constitute legal advice. You should seek your own advice specific to your business’ requirements.

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Reblogged 2 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

How to stop worrying about Google updates

Google is providing less information about algorithm updates these days, leaving SEOs scrambling for answers every time they experience a huge drop in traffic. But columnist Kristine Schachinger believes that all this panic is unnecessary. Read on to learn why.

The post How to stop worrying about…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

GDPR – 12 months to go, 12 things to think about (Part 1 of 4)

So, here we are. There are less than 12 months to go to the implementation date of the new General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) on 25th May 2018.

It would be great to say that all UK businesses are well on their way to being ready, but data from the DMA released at an event this morning tells a different story.

Marketers are feeling less confident about GDPR than they did in February when 68% of businesses said they were ‘on course’ or ‘ahead’ of plans to be GDPR compliant by May 2018. Since that survey, the ICO and the Article 29 Working Party have issued both guidance and discussion documents bringing businesses greater clarity around what GDPR compliance will entail. This greater clarity has caused respondents to reassess their positions:

  • Only 55% of companies feel they are now ‘on course’ or ‘ahead’ of plans to meet the May 2018 deadline.
  • Marketers perception of their knowledge as ‘good’ rather than ‘basic’ has slipped from 66% to 59%.
  • Marketers sense of being ‘extremely’ or ‘somewhat’ prepared has fallen from 71% to 61%.

What has not changed is marketers’ four big GDPR-related concerns:

  1. Consent
  2. Legacy Data
  3. Implementing a compliant system
  4. Profiling

So what should you be thinking about? Here are 12 things to get you started.

  • Awareness

If you are the only person in your organization that is thinking about GDPR, you could be in big, big trouble. This is a major change to the legislative regime in which your business operates, so not only do key people need to be made aware of the revisions your business will need to make, they also need to be made to care.

As one of the speakers at this morning’s DMA event pointed out, good data practitioners already have the proper use of data on their radar; much of what the GDPR contains could therefore be considered business as usual. By stressing that this data attention is now in favor of helping the business comply with the new GDPR regulations, you may be able to obtain more budget for your undertaking.

While I am sure this is true in some cases, I know that for many companies, GDPR will represent a radical change in how they do business. It is critical that senior management is made of the impact sooner rather than later and that all members of staff are trained and brought up to speed on the changes over the next twelve months.

  1. Data Audit

While you are running your internal PR campaign, you can also be talking to all of the people that have data bases squirrelled away here, there and everywhere; these will need to be examined. Among other things, you need to fully document:

  • What data you hold
  • Where you obtained it
  • When it was acquired
  • How often it is updated
  • All of the places it is stored within your organization
  • How the data flows from one place to another
  • Who has access to the data throughout its journey
  • How it is stored
  • Where it is stored
  • The retention policy for each datum

  1. Privacy Notices

One of the things that will most likely have to change for most UK businesses under GDPR is their privacy notices. Being open, honest and transparent with consumers about what data you are collecting, why, how you will be using it, and how you will take care of it has been a core principle of data protection law since the original Data Protection Act of 1998. What has changed, however, is that the legislators feel that data owners have not always done this to the best of their ability. They have therefore given us more detailed instructions as to what openness, honesty and transparency entails in practice. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has released a great code of practice on privacy notices.

 

Check back next week to read 4-12 of 12 things to think about before GDPR 2018.

The post GDPR – 12 months to go, 12 things to think about (Part 1 of 4) appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

What You Need to Know About Duplicate GMB Listings [Excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO]

Posted by JoyHawkins

Recently, I’ve had a lot of people ask me how to deal with duplicate listings in Google My Business now that MapMaker is dead. Having written detailed instructions outlining different scenarios for the advanced local SEO training manual I started selling over at LocalU, I thought it’d be great to give Moz readers a sample of 5 pages from the manual outlining some best practices.


What you need to know about duplicate GMB listings

Before you start, you need to find out if the listing is verified. If the listing has an “own this business” or “claim this business” option, it is not currently verified. If missing that label, it means it is verified — there is nothing you can do until you get ownership or have it unverified (if you’re the one who owns it in GMB). This should be your first step before you proceed with anything below.

Storefronts

  • Do the addresses on the two listings match? If the unverified duplicate has the same address as the verified listing, you should contact Google My Business support and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the addresses do not match, find out if the business used to be at that address at some point in time.
    • If the business has never existed there:
      • Pull up the listing on Maps
      • Press “Suggest an edit”
      • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
      • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

  • If the duplicate lists an address that is an old address (they were there at some point but have moved), you will want to have the duplicate marked as moved.

Service area businesses

  • Is the duplicate listing verified? If it is, you will first have to get it unverified or gain access to it. Once you’ve done that, contact Google My Business and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the duplicate is not verified, you can have it removed from Maps since service area businesses are not permitted on Google Maps. Google My Business allows them, but any unverified listing would follow Google Maps rules, not Google My Business. To remove it:
    • Pull up the listing on Maps
    • Press “Suggest an edit”
    • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
    • Select “Private” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

Practitioner listings

Public-facing professionals (doctors, lawyers, dentists, realtors, etc.) are allowed their own listings separate from the office they work for, unless they’re the only public-facing professional at that office. In that case, they are considered a solo practitioner and there should only be one listing, formatted as “Business Name: Professional Name.”

Solo practitioner with two listings

This is probably one of the easiest scenarios to fix because solo practitioners are only supposed to have one listing. If you have a scenario where there’s a listing for both the practice and the practitioner, you can ask Google My Business to merge the two and it will combine the ranking strength of both. It will also give you one listing with more reviews (if each individual listing had reviews on it). The only scenario where I don’t advise combining the two is if your two listings both rank together and are monopolizing two of the three spots in the 3-pack. This is extremely rare.

Multi-practitioner listings

If the business has multiple practitioners, you are not able to get these listings removed or merged provided the practitioner still works there. While I don’t generally suggest creating listings for practitioners, they often exist already, leaving people to wonder what to do with them to keep them from competing with the listing for the practice.

A good strategy is to work on having multiple listings rank if you have practitioners that specialize in different things. Let’s say you have a chiropractor who also has a massage therapist at his office. The massage therapist’s listing could link to a page on the site that ranks highly for “massage therapy” and the chiropractor could link to the page that ranks highest organically for chiropractic terms. This is a great way to make the pages more visible instead of competing.

Another example would be a law firm. You could have the main listing for the law firm optimized for things like “law firm,” then have one lawyer who specializes in personal injury law and another lawyer who specializes in criminal law. This would allow you to take advantage of the organic ranking for several different keywords.

Keep in mind that if your goal is to have three of your listings all rank for the exact same keyword on Google, thus monopolizing the entire 3-pack, this is an unrealistic strategy. Google has filters that keep the same website from appearing too many times in the results and unless you’re in a really niche industry or market, it’s almost impossible to accomplish this.

Practitioners who no longer work there

It’s common to find listings for practitioners who no longer work for your business but did at some point. If you run across a listing for a former practitioner, you’ll want to contact Google My Business and ask them to mark the listing as moved to your practice listing. It’s extremely important that you get them to move it to your office listing, not the business the practitioner now works for (if they have been employed elsewhere). Here is a good case study that shows you why.

If the practitioner listing is verified, things can get tricky since Google My Business won’t be able to move it until it’s unverified. If the listing is verified by the practitioner and they refuse to give you access or remove it, the second-best thing would be to get them to update the listing to have their current employer’s information on it. This isn’t ideal and should be a last resort.

Listings for employees (not public-facing)

If you find a listing for a non-public-facing employee, it shouldn’t exist on Maps. For example: an office manager of a law firm, a paralegal, a hygienist, or a nurse. You can get the listing removed:

  • Pull up the listing on Maps
  • Press “Suggest an edit”
  • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed..” to Yes
  • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit.

Listings for deceased practitioners

This is always a terrible scenario to have to deal with, but I’ve run into lots of cases where people don’t know how to get rid of listings for deceased practitioners. The solution is similar to what you would do for someone who has left the practice, except you want to add an additional step. Since the listings are often verified and people usually don’t have access to the deceased person’s Google account, you want to make sure you tell Google My Business support that the person is deceased and include a link to their obituary online so the support worker can confirm you’re telling the truth. I strongly recommend using either Facebook or Twitter to do this, since you can easily include the link (it’s much harder to do on a phone call).

Creating practitioner listings

If you’re creating a practitioner listing from scratch, you might run into issues if you’re trying to do it from the Google My Business dashboard and you already have a verified listing for the practice. The error you would get is shown below.

There are two ways around this:

  1. Create the listing via Google Maps. Do this by searching the address and then clicking “Add a missing place.” Do not include the firm/practice name in the title of the listing or your edit most likely won’t go through, since it will be too similar to the listing that already exists for the practice. Once you get an email from Google Maps stating the listing has been successfully added, you will be able to claim it via GMB.
  2. Contact GMB support and ask them for help.

We hope you enjoyed this excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO! The full 160+-page guide is available for purchase and download via LocalU below.

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Reblogged 3 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Local SEO is about so much more than tools

Tools can help us do our jobs more efficiently, but columnist Greg Gifford reminds us that they aren’t meant to do our jobs for us.

The post Local SEO is about so much more than tools appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 7 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Everything you need to know about Google’s ‘Possum’ algorithm update

Wondering what’s up with local search rankings lately? Columnist Joy Hawkins has the scoop on a recent local algorithm update that local SEO experts are calling ‘Possum.’

The post Everything you need to know about Google’s ‘Possum’ algorithm update appeared first on Search Engine…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 11 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Is a big Google search update happening? Chatter thinks so.

The SEO community is vigorously talking about two Google updates, one with the core web search results and one with the local pack results.

The post Is a big Google search update happening? Chatter thinks so. appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 11 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Darryl, the man behind dotmailer’s Custom Technical Solutions team

Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

I first got to know dotmailer when the company was just a bunch of young enthusiastic web developers called Ellipsis Media back in 1999. I was introduced by one of my suppliers and we decided to bring them on board to build a recruitment website for one of our clients. That client was Amnesty International and the job role was Secretary General. Not bad for a Croydon company whose biggest client before that was Scobles the plumber’s merchants. So, I was probably dotmailer’s first ever corporate client! After that, I used dotmailer at each company I worked for and then one day they approached a colleague and me and asked us if we wanted to work for them. That was 2013.  We grabbed the opportunity with both hands and haven’t looked back since.

Tell us a bit about your role

I’m the Global Head of Technical Solutions which actually gives me responsibility for 2 teams. First, Custom Technical Solutions (CTS), who build bespoke applications and tools for customers that allow them to integrate more closely with dotmailer and make life easier. Second, Technical Pre-sales, which spans our 3 territories (EMEA, US and APAC) and works with prospective and existing clients to figure out the best solution and fit within dotmailer.

What accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I would say so far it has to be helping to turn the CTS team from just 2 people into a group of 7 highly skilled and dedicated men and women who have become an intrinsic and valued part of the dotmailer organization. Also I really enjoy being part of the Senior Technical Management team. Here we have the ability to influence the direction and structure of the platform on a daily basis.

Meet Darryl Clark – the cheese and peanut butter sandwich lover

Can you speak a bit about your background and that of your team? What experience and expertise is required to join this team?

My background is quite diverse from a stint in the Army, through design college, web development, business analysis to heading up my current teams. I would say the most valuable skill that I have is being highly analytical. I love nothing more than listening to a client’s requirements and digging deep to work out how we can answer these if not exceed them.

As a team, we love nothing more than brainstorming our ideas. Every member has a valid input and we listen. Everyone has the opportunity to influence what we do and our motto is “there is no such thing as a stupid question.”

To work in my teams you have to be analytical but open minded to the fact that other people may have a better answer than you. Embrace other people’s input and use it to give our clients the best possible solution. We are hugely detail conscious, but have to be acutely aware that we need to tailor what we say to our audience so being able to talk to anyone at any level is hugely valuable.

How much of the dotmailer platform is easily customizable and when does it cross over into something that requires your team’s expertise? How much time is spent on these custom solutions one-time or ongoing?

I’ll let you in on a little secret here. We don’t actually do anything that our customers can’t do with dotmailer given the right knowledge and resources. This is because we build all of our solutions using the dotmailer public API. The API has hundreds of methods in both SOAP and REST versions, which allows you to do a huge amount with the dotmailer platform. We do have a vast amount of experience and knowledge in the team so we may well be able to build a solution quicker than our customers. We are more than happy to help them and their development teams build a solution using us on a consultancy basis to lessen the steepness of the learning curve.

Our aim when building a solution for a customer is that it runs silently in the background and does what it should without any fuss.

What are your plans for the Custom Tech Solutions team going forward?

The great thing about Custom Technical Solutions is you never know what is around the corner as our customers have very diverse needs. What we are concentrating on at the moment is refining our processes to ensure that they are as streamlined as possible and allow us to give as much information to the customer as we can. We are also always looking at the technology and coding approaches that we use to make sure that we build the most innovative and robust solutions.

We are also looking at our external marketing and sharing our knowledge through blogs so keep an eye on the website for our insights.

What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

Most questions seem to revolve around reassurance such as “Have you done this before?”, “How safe is my data?”, “What about security?”, “Can you talk to my developers?”, “Do I need to do anything?”.  In most instances, we are the ones asking the questions as we need to find out information as soon as possible so that we can analyse it to ensure that we have the right detail to provide the right solution.

Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

We talk a lot about working with best of breed so for example a customer can use our Channel Extensions in automation programs to fire out an SMS to a contact using their existing provider. We don’t force customers down one route, we like to let them decide for themselves.

Also, I really like to emphasize the fact that there is always more than one way to do something within the dotmailer platform. This means we can usually find a way to do something that works for a client within the platform. If not, then we call in CTS to work out if there is a way that we can build something that will — whether this is automating uploads for a small client or mass sending from thousands of child accounts for an enterprise level one.

What do you see as the future of marketing automation technology?  Will one size ever fit all? Or more customization going forward?

The 64 million dollar question. One size will never fit all. Companies and their systems are too organic for that. There isn’t one car that suits every driver or one racquet that suits every sport. Working with a top drawer partner network and building our system to be as open as possible from an integration perspective means that our customers can make dotmailer mold to their business and not the other way round…and adding to that the fact that we are building lots of features in the platform that will blow your socks off.

Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m a dyed in the wool Gooner (aka Arsenal Football Club fan) thanks to my Grandfather leading me down the right path as a child. If you are still reading this after that bombshell, then food-wise I pretty much like everything apart from coriander which as far as I’m concerned is the Devils own spawn. I don’t really have a favorite band, but am partial to a bit of Level 42 and Kings of Leon and you will also find me listening to 90s drum and bass and proper old school hip hop. My favorite holiday destination is any decent villa that I can relax in and spend time with my family and I went to Paris recently and loved that. Guilty pleasure – well that probably has to be confessing to liking Coldplay or the fact that my favorite sandwich is peanut butter, cheese and salad cream. Go on try it, you’ll love it.

Want to meet more of the dotmailer team? Say hi to Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support, and Dan Morris, EVP for North America.

Reblogged 11 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com