Make the Most of Your MozCon 2017 Adventure – A Seattle How-To

Posted by Danielle_Launders

There’s a little secret we keep here in Seattle: it doesn’t actually rain all the time (we just want people to think that so we can keep the beautiful summers all to ourselves). Those of you who have been to a MozCon before are in on that secret; those of you who are joining us for MozCon 2017 on July 17–19 will soon find out!

It can be hard coming to a new city and trying to find food and experiences off the beaten path, which is why Mozzers have come together to share some of their favorite places, both new and old, to help you make the most of your time in Seattle this summer. If you don’t have your ticket and don’t want to miss out on all the fun, grab yours now — they’re selling out!

Buy my MozCon 2017 ticket

Unfamiliar with MozCon and not sure what you’ll learn? Scope out the full agenda with all the juicy details on who’s speaking and what topics we’re covering.

Official MozCon activities

We want you to enjoy yourself, make new industry friends, and get the most out of your MozCon experience — which is why we have an assortment of events and activities to keep you busy.

Monday night #MozCrawl

Monday night is all about exploring and making new friends. Join us from 7–10pm for our annual #MozCrawl. This year we’re bringing it back to the Capitol Hill neighborhood! Get to know your fellow attendees and our six MozCon partners hosting the fun. You’ll be able to go at your own pace and in any order.

Bonus points: have your MozCon Passport stamped at all of the stops and enter our drawing to win a ticket to MozCon 2018.

Capitol Cider hosted by Klipfolio

Linda’s Tavern hosted by WordStream

The Runaway hosted by CallRail

Stout hosted by Jumpshot

Unicorn hosted by BuzzStream

Saint John’s Bar & Eatery hosted by Moz

Tuesday night MozCon Ignite

You’ll definitely laugh, you’ll likely cry, and most importantly you’ll enjoy yourself at MozCon Ignite. Listen to twelve of your fellow attendees share their journeys, life lessons, and unique hobbies in our five-minute Ignite-style passion talk series. MozCon Ignite will take place at Benaroya Hall from 7–10pm, where you’ll have time to relax, unwind, and mingle.

  • My Life with Guinea Pigs with Britt Kemp at Bishop Fox
  • A Disastrous Camping Trip with the Best Partner with JR Ridley at Go Fish Digital
  • My Wife, Actually: A Story of Being Gay Enough with Joy Brandon at Nebo Agency
  • Homebrewing 101: A 5-minute Primer on DIY Alcohol with Erin McCaul at Moz
  • This Too Shall Pass: The Blessing of Perspective with Yosef Silver at Search Interactions
  • The King of Swing: A Guide to Creative Fundraising with Cameron Rogowski at Double Dumplings
  • How Finding my Sister’s Mother Changed my Life with Ed Reese at JEB Commerce
  • Living My Life with an Identical Clone with Christopher Beck at Internet Marketing Inc.
  • How to Change Sex the Easy Way with Maura Hubbell at Moz
  • 4 Signs Your Friend or Loved One is a Birder with Jeremy Schwartz at MediaPro
  • How to Save Humanity in Twenty Minutes a Day with Andrea Dunlop, author & independent book marketing consultant
  • Traumatic Brain Injury & Why Self-Diagnosis Sucks with Blake Denman at RicketyRoo Inc.

Wednesday night MozCon Bash

Bowling: check! Karaoke: check! Photobooth: check! Join us for one last hurrah before we meet again at MozCon 2018. You won’t want to miss this closing night bash — we’ll have plenty of games, food, and fun as we mix and mingle, say “see ya soon” to friends new and old, and reminisce over our favorite lessons from the past 3 days.

Birds-of-a-feather lunch tables

At lunch, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with your fellow community members around the professional topics that matter most to you. There will be seven tables each day with different topics and facilitators; find one with a sign noting the topic and join the conversation to share advice, learn tips and tricks, and make new friends.

Monday, July 17

  • B2B Email Marketing hosted by Steve Manjarrez at Moz
  • E-commerce hosted by Everett Sizemore at Inflow
  • In-house SEO hosted by Kristin Fraccia at Magoosh
  • It’s Just Me — Digital Departments of One hosted by Liz Reuth at Le-vel
  • Linkbuilding hosted by Rachael Brandt at Magoosh
  • On-Page SEO hosted by Cyrus Shepard at Fazillion
  • Travel Website SEO hosted by Michael Cottam at Visual Itineraries

Tuesday, July 18

  • In-house SEO hosted by Jackson Lo at Tripadvisor
  • Link Building hosted by Russ Jones at Moz
  • Mobile Marketing hosted by Bridget Randolph at Hearst Magazines
  • Perceiving Brand Through Digital PR hosted by Manish Dudharejia at E2M Solutions
  • Product Marketing hosted by Brittani Dinsmore at Moz
  • Search Trends hosted by Gianluca Fiorelli at IloveSEO.net
  • Technical SEO hosted by Corey Eulas at Factorial Digital

Wednesday, July 19

Even more ideas for your Seattle adventure!

There are so many wonderful places to see, food to eat, and yes, coffee and craft beer to be consumed. Lots and lots of coffee and craft brews. That’s why a few Mozzers have pulled together their favorite places to check out during your stay in the Emerald City.

No Anchor
“By far my favorite place in Belltown. Incredibly unique beer selection and fresh local food combinations that you can’t find anywhere else.”
Abe Schmidt

Marination Ma Kai
“Marination is one of the top food trucks in the country and now they have several brick and mortar restaurants. Marination Ma Kai is located in West Seattle and has a big outdoor patio with gorgeous views of downtown Seattle, it’s a summer hotspot for a cool beverage and noms. Why is it quintessential Seattle? Not only is the food life changing, the view amazing, but getting there is an adventure! Just walk down to the waterfront and hop on the wonderful Seattle Water Taxi. The trip from downtown drops riders off right at the restaurant.”

Rapha Seattle
“If you LOVE bicycles this place is a must-visit. One of only five US Rapha Clubhouses, Rapha Seattle is home to delicious coffee, fine food, and bicycle events.

The atmosphere is cool and inviting. Visitors are surrounded by the coolest bicycle gear and memorabilia. You can rent a Canyon bicycle to explore the city (Which is a big deal because you cannot buy Canyon bikes in America, yet). Rapha also does guided bike rides for the public and member only rides.”
James Daugherty

Taylor Shellfish (Pioneer Square, Capitol Hill, or Queen Anne)
“The Puget Sound offers the best oysters in the world. What’s great about Taylor Shellfish is that it’s all about the oysters, the drinks and the people you’re with in a simple, unpretentious, come-as-you-are atmosphere. There’s nothing more quintessential to Seattle than that.”

The Point in Burien
“An all-around great bar to grab a bite and a drink if your flight is delayed or you need to kill some time near the airport. The Point is 10 minutes from SeaTac, has a fantastic menu (including lots of gluten free options), a great cocktail menu, tap list, and big-screen TVs.”
Brittani Dinsmore

Hattie’s Hat
“Ballard was an old fishing village. Hattie’s Hat bar has been in continuous operation for over 100 years and the bar that you sit at was installed in 1907 or something. Incredible. The bartenders are all in Seattle bands, some of them moderately famous from the 1990s. Go in the early afternoon. Ask for Lupe or Lara. Sit at the bar. You’ll thank me for it.“
Brian Childs

Holy Mountain Brewery
“Seattle is a beer city. Holy Mountain makes Seattle’s best beer. Go there.”
Evelyn Baek

The Whale Wins, Revel, Joule, and Fremont Brewing
“All are in the Fremont area and are each tasty in their own right. Besides if you don’t like those options there are plenty of places to choose from in Fremont”
Steve Manjarrez

Ada’s Technical Books and Cafe
“Coffee + super sleek bookstore that encourages women in tech and science. Need I say more?”
Meredith Crandell

Still hungry? Check out:

And don’t miss our posts from years past, which are full of even more recommendations: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2012.

If you’re looking to connect with fellow attendees, please join our MozCon Facebook Group.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 1 month ago from tracking.feedpress.it

How to Delete a Google My Business Listing – A Common Question with a Complex Answer

Posted by MiriamEllis

“How do I delete a Google listing?” is an FAQ on local SEO forums — and it represents an oversimplification of a complicated and multifaceted issue. The truth is, simple deletion is seldom the answer. Rather, most events that arise in the course of doing business require knowing which steps to take to properly manage GMB listings so that they’re helping your business instead of harming it.

When it comes to managing unwanted or problematic Google My Business listings, it’s a case of horses for courses. There isn’t a single set of instructions you can reliably follow, because your particular scenario defines which steps you should take. The following table should help you identify common situations and choose the one that most closely matches yours. From there, you’ll learn which actions are available to you, and which ones, unfortunately, can’t be accomplished.

Because management of problem GMB listings usually requires either being in control of them or unverifying them, our chart begins with three verification scenarios, and then moves on to cover other typical business events.

Scenario

Context

Steps

Notes

Unverify a Verified Listing You Control

You have a listing in your GMB dashboard that you no longer wish to control.

  • Log into your GMB dashboard
  • Click “edit”
  • Click the “info” tab
  • Click “remove listing”
  • Check all the checkboxes
  • Click “delete account”

No worries: The last step does NOT delete your Google account or the listing, itself. It simply un-verifies it so that you are no longer controlling it. The listing will still exist and someone else can take control of it.

Verify an Unverified Listing to Gain Control

You need to take control of an unwanted listing. You can tell it’s not verified, because it’s marked “claim this business” in Google Maps or “own this business?” in the knowledge panel.

Once you’ve verified the listing, you can take next steps to manage it if it’s problematic.

Take Control of a Listing Someone Else Verified

You need to take control of an unwanted listing, but someone else has verified it. You can tell it’s verified, because it lacks the attributes of “claim this business” in Google Maps or “own this business?” in the knowledge panel.

  • Contact Google via these steps
  • Google will contact the owner
  • If Google doesn’t hear back from the owner in one week, you can verify the listing

There are some anecdotal accounts of owners being able to prove to Google their rights to control a listing based on their control of an email address that matches the website domain, but no guarantees. You may need to seek legal counsel to mediate resolution with a third party who refuses to relinquish control of the listing.

Manage a Duplicate Listing for a Brick-and-Mortar Business

Your business serves customers at your location (think a retail shop, restaurant, law practice). You find more than one listing representing the business, either at its present location, at an incorrect location, or at a previous location.

  • If the address exactly matches the correct, current address of the business, contact Google to request that they merge the two listings into one.
  • If the address contains an error and the business never existed there, use the “suggest an edit” link on Google Maps, toggle the yes/no switch to “yes,” and choose the “never existed” radio button.
  • If the address is one the business previously occupied, see the section in this table on business moves.

If reviews have become associated with a business address that contains an error, you can try to request that the reviews be transferred PRIOR to designating that the business “never existed” in Google Maps.

Manage a Duplicate Listing for a Service Area Business (SAB)

Your business serves customers at their locations (think a plumber, landscaper, or cleaning service). You find more than one listing representing the business.

  • Once you’ve verified the duplicate listing, contact Google to request that they merge the two listings into one.

Remember that Google’s guidelines require that you keep addresses for SAB listings hidden.

Manage an Unwanted Listing for a Multi-Practitioner Business

The business has multiple partners (think a legal firm or medical office). You discover multiple listings for a specific partner, or for partners who no longer work there, or for partner who are deceased.

  • Unfortunately, Google will not remove multi-practitioner listings for partners who are presently employed by the business.
  • If the partner no longer works there, read this article about the dangers of ignoring these listings. Then, contact Google to request that they designate the listing as “moved” (like when a business moves) to the address of the practice — not to the partner’s new address. *See notes.
  • If, regrettably, a partner has passed away, contact Google to show them an obituary.

In the second scenario, Google can only mark a past partner’s listing as moved if the listing is unverified. If the listing is verified, it would be ideal if the old partner would unverify it for you, but, if they are unwilling to do so, at least try to persuade them to update the listing with the details of their new location as a last resort. Unfortunately, this second option is far from ideal.

On a separate note, if the unwanted listing pertains to a solo-practitioner business (there’s a listing for both the company and for a single practitioner who operates the company), you can contact Google to ask that they merge the two listings in an effort to combine the ranking power of the two listings, if desired.

Manage a Listing When a Business Moves

Your company is moving to a new location. You want to avoid having the listing marked as “permanently closed,” sending a wrong signal to consumers that you’ve gone out of business.

  • Update your website with your new contact information and driving directions
  • Update your existing GMB listing in the Google My Business dashboard. Don’t create a new listing!
  • Update your other local business listings to reflect your new info. A product like Moz Local can greatly simplify this big task.

Be sure to use your social platforms to advertise your move.

Be sure to be on the lookout for any new duplicate listings that may arise as a result of a move. Again, Moz Local will be helpful for this.

Google will generally automatically move your reviews from your old location to your new one, but read this to understand exceptions.

Manage a Listing Marked “Permanently Closed”

A listing of yours has ended up marked as “permanently closed,” signaling to consumers that you may have gone out of business. Permanently closed listings are also believed to negatively impact the rankings of your open business.

  • If the “permanently closed” label exists on a verified listing for a previous location the business occupied, unverify the listing. Then contact Google to ask them to mark it as moved to the new location. This should rectify the “permanently closed” problem.
  • If the permanently closed listing exists on a listing for your business that someone else as verified (i.e., you don’t control the listing), please see the above section labeled “Take Control of a Listing Someone Else Verified.” If you can get control of it in your dashboard and then unverify it, you’ll then be able to contact Google to ask them to mark it as moved.

The “permanently closed” label can also appear on listings for practitioners who have left the business. See the section of this chart labeled “Manage an Unwanted Listing for a Multi-Practitioner Business.”

Manage a Merger/Acquisition

Many nuances to this scenario may dictate specific steps. If the merger/acquisition includes all of the previous physical locations remaining open to the public under the new name, just edit the details of the existing GMB listings to display that new name. But, if the locations that have been acquired close down, move onto the next steps.

  • Don’t edit the details of the old locations to reflect the new name
  • Unverify the listings for the old locations
  • Finally, contact Google to ask them to mark all the old locations listings as moved to the new location.

Mergers and acquisitions are complex and you may want to hire a consultant to help you manage this major business event digitally. You may also find the workload significantly lightened by using a product like Moz Local to manage the overhaul of core citations for all the businesses involved in the event.

Manage a Spam Listing

You realize a competitor or other business is violating Google’s guidelines, as in the case of creating listings at fake locations. You want to clean up the results to improve their relevance to the local community.

  • Find the listing in Google Maps
  • Click the “suggest an edit” link
  • Toggle the yes/no toggle to “yes”
  • Choose the radio button for “spam”
  • Google will typically email you if/when your edit is accepted

Google doesn’t always act on spam. If you follow the outlined steps and don’t get anywhere with them, you may want to post the spam example in the GMB forum in hopes that a Top Contributor there might escalate the issue.

Unfortunately, spam is very common. Don’t be surprised if a spammer who gets caught comes right back on and continues to spam.

Manage a Listing with Bad Reviews

Your company is embarrassed by the negative reviews that are attached to its GMB listing. You wish you could just make the whole thing disappear.

  • If the reviews violate Google’s policy, consider these steps for taking action. Be advised that Google may not remove them, regardless of clear violations.
  • If the reviews are negative but genuine, Google will not remove them. Remedy the problems, in-house, that consumers are citing and master responding to reviews in a way that can save customers and your business.
  • If the business is unable to remedy structural problems being cited in reviews, the company may lack the necessary components for success.

Short of completely rebranding and moving your business to a new location, your business must be prepared to manage negative reviews. Unless consumers are citing illegal behaviors (in which case, you need legal counsel rather than marketing), negative reviews should be viewed as a FREE blueprint for fixing the issues that customers are citing.

Bear in mind that many unhappy customers won’t take the time to complain. They’ll just go away in silence and never return to your business again. When a customer takes the time to voice a complaint, seize this as a golden opportunity to win him back and to improve your business for all future customers.

Whew! Eleven common Google My Business listing management scenarios, each requiring its own set of steps. It’s my hope that this chart will not only help explain why few cases really come down to deleting GMB listings, and also, that it will serve as a handy reference for you when particular situations arise in your workday.

Helpful links

  1. If you’re not sure if you have problem listings, do a free lookup with the Moz Check Listing tool.
  2. If you’re a Moz Pro member, you have access to our Q&A forum. Please feel free to ask our community questions if you’re unsure about whether a GMB listing is problematic.
  3. The Google My Business Forum can be a good bet for getting advice from volunteer Top Contributors (and sometimes Google staffers) about problem GMB listings. Be prepared to share all of the details of your scenario if you post there.
  4. If you find yourself dealing with difficult Google My Business listing issues on a regular basis, I recommend reading the work of Joy Hawkins, who is one of the best technical local SEOs in the industry.
  5. Sometimes, the only thing you can do is to contact Google directly to try to get help with a tricky problem. Here is their main Contact page. If you’re a Google Adwords customer, you can phone 1-866-2Google and select the option for Google My Business support. Another way to seek help (and this is sometimes the fastest route) is to tweet to Google’s GMB Twitter account. Be advised that not every Google rep has had the benefits of complete training. Some interactions may be more satisfactory than others. And, if you are a digital marketer, do be prepared to set correct client expectations that not all problems can be resolved. Sometimes, even your best efforts may not yield the desired results, due to the limitations of Google’s local product.

Why it’s worth the effort to work to resolve problematic Google listings

Cumulatively speaking, inaccurate and duplicative listings can misinform and misdirect consumers while also sapping your ranking strength. Local business listings are a form of customer service, and when this element of your overall marketing plan is neglected, it can lead to significant loss of traffic and revenue. It can also negatively impact reputation in the form of negative reviews citing wrong online driving directions or scenarios in which customers end up at the old location of a business that has moved.

Taken altogether, these unwanted outcomes speak to the need for an active location data management strategy that monitors all business listings for problems and takes appropriate actions to remedy them. Verifying listings and managing duplicates isn’t glamorous work, but when you consider what’s at stake for the business, it’s not only necessary work, but even heroic. So, skill up and be prepared to tackle the thorniest situations. The successes can be truly rewarding!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 2 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it