dotdigital bags the 2019 Best Marketing Automation Partner Award at NORA Solution Partner Excellence Awards

dotdigital APAC emerged as winners of the Best Marketing Automation category at the recent NORA Solution Partner Excellence Awards, held at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney.

The awards, organized by the National Online Retail Association (NORA), celebrated behind-the-scenes heroes of the online retail industry. The winners were chosen through a voting process whereby retailers across Australia and New Zealand voted for their favorite technology vendor under each category.

A heartfelt congratulations to all the winners! This award is a great achievement for the entire dotdigital APAC team and reflects the commitment and effort that each one puts into servicing our customers and building the dotdigital brand within the Australian market and beyond.

Rohan Lock, Regional Director of APAC, was interviewed during the event and here are his thoughts after accepting the award!

The awards hosted by Paul Greenberg, Founder of NORA Network, and change and leadership expert, Nigel Collin, were the Australian retail industry’s first sustainable awards evening. Every aspect of the event had a high standard of sustainability, from food prepared with sustainably farmed produce, the use of recycled/recyclable materials, and a goal of zero waste. Well done to NORA Network for a hosting a fantastic evening. We are looking forward to next year’s gala already!


Unlock your cross-channel marketing potential with Engagement Cloud. For a quick demo, click here.

The post dotdigital bags the 2019 Best Marketing Automation Partner Award at NORA Solution Partner Excellence Awards appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 4 weeks ago from blog.dotdigital.com

dotmailer’s Global Head of Support enjoys success at this year’s Contact Centre Awards

Incredible people power, a rapid response to queries, and dedication on a one-to-one level – these are the elements of customer support that we believe empowers marketers – and it’s what makes us the ESP trusted by brands like Barbour, Fred Perry, Screwfix and VIZIO. So it’s no surprise to us that dotmailer’s Global Head of Support, Darren Hockley, was recently awarded the Special Judges Award at the 2017 London & South East Contact Center Awards.

The team enjoyed an exciting evening of celebrations at The Marriott in Heathrow having entered into two impressive categories: Support Team of the Year and Digital Customer Service Team of the Year. We caught up with Darren back at the office to find out more:

Congratulations on your brilliant achievement, Darren.

Thanks a lot. I’m still in a bit of shock, really – it was quite unexpected. We’d entered into two categories and were unsuccessful this time around. But to be recognized by the judges for an individual award for outstanding performance was really special.

Absolutely – what a fantastic prize! What does the award mean for you?

To be perfectly honest, this is everyone’s award. I was showcasing the work we’ve achieved as a team, and I feel very proud of how far we’ve come in a year. To see us up alongside huge household names like UK Power Networks and Choice Hotels is testament to the incredible support the team provides for dotmailer customers and the impact that made on this year’s judges. So that feels pretty special.

For anyone who might be in the dark about dotmailer Support, can you provide a flavor of some of your team’s day-to-day activities?

The dotmailer Support team are the first line of call for anything platform related. We operate across all of our global office locations, and provide one-on-one support to our 5,000+ customers across 70,000+ accounts. A lot of what we do is technical enablement; we play a crucial role in on-boarding new users so they get the best out of their best-of-breed ESP. Plus, with so many of our customers taking advantage of dotmailer’s ecommerce integration functionality, we’re there to help people get started without a hitch.

Cool! What would you say your best achievements have been in this past year?

We set ourselves some challenging goals this year, which I’m proud to say we’ve smashed. We wanted to improve our Livechat functionality, first and foremost; with email volumes on the rise, it’s crucial that all of our customers can get in contact with Support quickly and easily. We implemented new, super-fast Livechat tech with an impressive look and feel for users. 98.9% of all chats were answered and the enhanced speed means that customers can expect to be answered in less than 2 minutes 27 seconds. As a result, we’ve seen a 21% decrease in customers having to email for support, and those using Livechat to get instant answers has increased by 230%. It’s been such a success that we’re considering expanding the technology and service to other teams across dotmailer.

Those are some stonking numbers, Darren. You must have a great team behind you.

Absolutely. Another key area we concentrated on was in providing the Support team with training and development opportunities. We think this focus was one of the key reasons we were finalists in the Contact Center Awards this year. Seven of our team members have received promotions this year. As the Global Head of Support, I take great pride in this; it’s fantastic to see highly-trained, committed and successful Support members receiving internal promotions for outstanding performance.

 

We’re not surprised! So what’s next for the Support team?

More of the same! We’re hoping to build on the successes of this year, and I hope the award I received on Monday can inspire the entire team to view their work as invaluable to the success of the company as a whole. Not all readers will know that we’re based in East Croydon in dotmailer’s first ever office; we’ve just entered the Croydon Business Excellence Awards 2017 so we’re looking forward to that. Outside of the glittering awards scene, we’ll be maintaining our passionate customer-focused mindset and will continue to ensure that every customer has the best possible experience when using the dotmailer platform.

Check out this testimonial from Customer Direct Marketing Manager at Forest Holidays, Sheri Riddlesworth:

“The results and support we have had for this project has been amazing, Firmin has gone above and beyond to onboard us and make it work with our website. His guidance, testing and knowledge was really appreciated and wouldn’t have been a success without him”.

dotmailer’s Support team are on hand 24 hours a day, Monday to Friday. If you need to get in touch, you can head to the Support Hub, where you’ll find the Livechat and a whole host of other useful information.

The post dotmailer’s Global Head of Support enjoys success at this year’s Contact Centre Awards appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Deadline for the 2017 eec Awards is fast approaching

The prestigious eec Email Maketing Awards is an annual event recognizing the great and the good of the industry. We’re also proud that our Founder & President, Tink Taylor, is on the eec Awards subcommittee.

It’s free and easy to nominate the people and the brands that have inspired you, plus there’s the opportunity to nominate more than one individual or email marketing program. This year there are a total of six awards up for grabs:

The eec is reminding those who are teetering on the edge of nominating that anyone has the chance to win; small or big, unknown or well known. It’s all about the work an individual or brand is doing and the impact it’s having on the industry – so don’t feel put off!

We watched the eec’s webinar on how to win an award, so we’re sharing some exclusive tips that’ll help you with your submission.

Tips for creating a winning submission

  • Get someone to nominate you – for instance, a co-worker, your boss, your agency, or an industry peer. Recognition makes submissions much more credible and self-nominating can rightfully rub the judges up the wrong way.
  • It’s primarily the writing that’s going to be judged, so try your best to tell a great story and use the results to back it up. Remember, you’re speaking to a person, not a machine! However, for some awards, you do also have the option to upload work samples and supporting documentation.
  • For awards with multiple category submission options, make sure you carefully read the criteria guidelines to prevent yourself from selling yourself short. If you’re unsure, the eec have said that it’s fine to reach out to the team and ask for clarification.
  • Brainstorm and draw out all of the email campaigns/programs that have pushed the needle for your brand. It could be a new initiative you’ve introduced, or dying program that’s been reinvigorated.
  • Gather the campaign/program specifics and metrics – think beyond opens and clicks to demonstrate the impact on revenue, cost savings and brand perception. Find the unique nuggets and shout about them. Think about what’s going to set you apart from the competition.

You can find out more about the awards on the eec website.

Good luck with your submissions! Winners will be notified at the end of March and will be honored on May 2, at the 2017 Email Evolution Conference in New Orleans.

The post Deadline for the 2017 eec Awards is fast approaching appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Link Building Tips from the US Search Awards Judges

With the US Search Awards fast approaching some of the Judges have been sharing their Link Building Tips. Below is a selection of recommendations ranging from why images are so important when dealing with the media, to how you should silo your digital assets, or use dual purpose links which drive both human traffic and…

The post Link Building Tips from the US Search Awards Judges appeared first on Majestic Blog.

Reblogged 4 years ago from blog.majestic.com

Creating Demand for Products, Services, and Ideas that Have Little to No Existing Search Volume – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

A lot of fantastic websites (and products, services, ideas, etc.) are in something of a pickle: The keywords they would normally think to target get next to no search volume. It can make SEO seem like a lost cause. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand explains why that’s not the case, and talks about the one extra step that’ll help those organizations create the demand they want.

For reference, here’s a still of this week’s whiteboard. Click on it to open a high resolution image in a new tab!

Video transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about a particularly challenging problem in the world of SEO, and that is trying to do SEO or trying to do any type of web marketing when your product, service, or idea has no search volume around it. So nobody is already looking for what you offer. It’s a new thing, a new concept.

I’ll use the example here of a website that I’m very fond of, but which there’s virtually no search volume for, called Niice. It’s Niice.co.

It’s great. I searched for things in here. It brings me back all these wonderful visuals from places like Colossus and lots of design portals. I love this site. I use it all the time for inspiration, for visuals, for stuff that I might write about on blogs, for finding new artists. It’s just cool. I love it. I love the discovery aspect of it, and I think it can be really great for finding artists and designers and visuals.

But when I looked at the keyword research — and granted I didn’t go deep into the keyword research, but let’s imagine that I did — I looked for things like: “visual search engine” almost no volume; “search engine for designers” almost no volume; “graphical search engine” almost no volume; “find designer visuals” nada.

So when they look at their keyword research they go, “Man, we don’t even have keywords to target here really.” SEO almost feels like it’s not a channel of opportunity, and I think that’s where many, many companies and businesses make mistakes actually, because just because you don’t see keyword research around exactly around what you’re offering doesn’t mean that SEO can’t be a great channel. It just means we have to do an extra step of work, and that’s what I want to talk about today.

So I think when you encounter this type of challenge — and granted it might not be the challenge that there’s no keyword volume — it could be a challenge in your business, for your organization, for some ideas or products that you have or are launching that there’s just very little, and thus you’re struggling to come up with enough volume to create the quantity of leads, or free trials, or customers that you need. This process really can work.

Key questions to start.

1) Who’s the target audience?

In Niice’s case, that’s going to be a lot of designers. It might be people who are creating presentations. It might be those who are searching out designers or artists. It could be people seeking inspiration for all sorts of things. So they’re going to figure out who that is.

From there, they can look at the job title, interests, demographics of those people, and then you can do some cool stuff where you can figure out things like, “Oh, you know what? We could do some Facebook ad targeting to those right groups to help boost their interests in our product and potentially, well, create branded search volume down the road, attract direct visitors, build brand awareness for ourselves, and potentially get some traffic to the site directly as well. If we can convert some of that traffic, well, that’s fantastic.”

In their case, I think Niice is ad-supported right now, so all they really need is the traffic itself. But regardless, this is that same type of process you’d use.

2) What else do they search for?

What is that target audience searching for? Knowledge, products, tools, services, people, brands, whatever it is, if you know who the audience is, you can figure out what they’re searching for because they have needs. If they have a job title, if they have interests, if you have those profile features about the audience, you can figure out what else they’re going to be searching for, and in this case, knowing what designers are searching for, well, that’s probably relatively simplistic. The other parts of their audience might be more complex, but that one is pretty obvious.

From that, we can do content creation. We can do keyword targeting to be in front of those folks when they’re doing search by creating content that may not necessarily be exactly selling our tools, but that’s the idea of content marketing. We’re creating content to target people higher up in the funnel before they need our product.

We can use that, too, for product and feature inspiration in the product itself. So in this case, Niice might consider creating a design pattern library or several, pulling from different places, or hiring someone to come in and build one for them and then featuring that somewhere on the site if you haven’t done a search yet and then potentially trying to rank for that in the search engine, which then brings qualified visitors, the types of people who once they got exposed to Niice would be like, “Wow, this is great and it’s totally free. I love it.”

UX tool list, so list of tools for user experience, people on the design or UI side, maybe Photoshop tutorials, whatever it is that they feel like they’re competent and capable of creating and could potentially rank for, well, now you’re attracting the right audience to your site before they need your product.

3) Where do they go?

That audience, where are they going on the web? What do they do when they get there? To whom do they listen? Who are their influencers? How can we be visible in those locations? So from that I can get things like influencer targeting and outreach. I can get ad and sponsorship opportunities. I can figure out places to do partnership or guest content or business development.

In Niice’s case, that might be things like sponsor or speak at design events. Maybe they could create an awards project for Dribble. So they go to Dribble, they look at what’s been featured there, or they go to Colossus, or some of the other sites that they feature, and they find the best work of the week. At the end of the week, they feature the top 10 projects, and then they call out the designers who put them together.

Wow, that’s terrific. Now you’re getting in front of the audience whose work you’re featuring, which is going to, in turn, make them amplify Niice’s project and product to an audience who’s likely to be in their target audience. It’s sort of a win-win. That’s also going to help them build links, engagement, shares, and all sorts of signals that potentially will help them with their authority, both topically and domain-wide, which then means they can rank for all the content they create, building up this wonderful engine.

4) What types of content have achieved broad or viral distribution?

I think what we can glean from this is not just inspiration for content and keyword opportunities as we can from many other kinds of content, but also sites to target, in particular sites to target with advertising, sites to target for guest posting or sponsorship, or sites to target for business development or for partnerships, site to target in an ad network, sites to target psychographically or demographically for Facebook if we want to run ads like that, potentially bidding on ads in Google when people search for that website or for that brand name in paid search.

So if you’re Niice, you could think about contracting some featured artist to contribute visuals maybe for a topical news project. So something big is happening in the news or in the design community, you contract a few of the artists whose work you have featured or are featuring, or people from the communities whose work you’re featuring, and say, “Hey, we might not be able to pay you a lot, but we’re going to get in front of a ton of people. We’re going to build exposure for you, which is something we already do, FYI, and now you’ve got some wonderful content that has that potential to mimic that work.”

You could think about, and I love this just generally as a content marketing and SEO tactic, if you go find viral content, content that has had wide sharing success across the web from the past, say two, three, four, or five years ago, you have a great opportunity, especially if the initial creator of that content or project hasn’t continued on with it, to go say, “Hey, you know what? We can do a version of that. We’re going to modernize and update that for current audiences, current tastes, what’s currently going on in the market. We’re going to go build that, and we have a strong feeling that it’s going to be successful because it’s succeeded in the past.”

That, I think, is a great way to get content ideas from viral content and then to potentially overtake them in the search rankings too. If something from three or five years ago, that was particularly timely then still ranks today, if you produce it, you’re almost certainly going to come out on top due to Google’s bias for freshness, especially around things that have timely relevance.

5) Should brand advertisement be in our consideration set?

Then last one, I like to ask about brand advertising in these cases, because when there’s not search volume yet, a lot of times what you have to do is create awareness. I should change this from advertising to a brand awareness, because really there’s organic ways to do it and advertising ways to do it. You can think about, “Well, where are places that we can target where we could build that awareness? Should we invest in press and public relations?” Not press releases. “Then how do we own the market?” So I think one of the keys here is starting with that name or title or keyword phrase that encapsulates what the market will call your product, service or idea.

In the case of Niice, that could be, well, visual search engines. You can imagine the press saying, “Well, visual search engines like Niice have recently blah, blah, blah.” Or it could be designer search engines, or it could be graphical search engines, or it could be designer visual engines, whatever it is. You need to find what that thing is going to be and what’s going to resonate.

In the case of Nest, that was the smart home. In the case of Oculus, it was virtual reality and virtual reality gaming. In the case of Tesla, it was sort of already established. There’s electric cars, but they kind of own that market. If you know what those keywords are, you can own the market before it gets hot, and that’s really important because that means that all of the press and PR and awareness that happens around the organic rankings for that particular keyword phrase will all be owned and controlled by you.

When you search for “smart home,” Nest is going to dominate those top 10 results. When you search for “virtual reality gaming,” Oculus is going to dominate those top 10. It’s not necessarily dominate just on their own site, it’s dominate all the press and PR articles that are about that, all of the Wikipedia page about it, etc., etc. You become the brand that’s synonymous with the keyword or concept. From an SEO perspective, that’s a beautiful world to live in.

So, hopefully, for those of you who are struggling around demand for your keywords, for your volume, this process can be something that’s really helpful. I look forward to hearing from you in the comments. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 4 years ago from tracking.feedpress.it

It’s time for the European Search Awards

On the 22nd April this week, the Majestic team will be heading over to Germany to attend this years’ European Search Awards. We are lucky enough to be shortlisted for not one, but three awards. Do you think we have the most innovative and best SEO Software? We sure do hope so! Our team will…

The post It’s time for the European Search Awards appeared first on Majestic Blog.

Reblogged 4 years ago from blog.majestic.com

Learn and collect with Majestic Awards

We’re thrilled to announce a fun new way to get better at using Majestic and compare your skills with other Internet Marketers. Majestic Awards brings a rewarding new game and leaderboard to Majestic. As we go live the leaderboard is being reset, but congratulations in testing to Onpage for topping our test leader board. Let’s…

The post Learn and collect with Majestic Awards appeared first on Majestic Blog.

Reblogged 4 years ago from blog.majestic.com

Congratulations to the SEMY Award winners in 2015

Last week, on the 17th March, the first ever German Search Marketing awards gala; the SEMY Awards for short, took place. The evening which occurred during SMX München was a wonderful event to honour the best of the best in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The winners were selected from a shortlist of nominations which had…

The post Congratulations to the SEMY Award winners in 2015 appeared first on Majestic Blog.

Reblogged 4 years ago from blog.majestic.com