5 stages of the customer lifecycle and which emails to send

What is customer lifecycle marketing and why is it important?

Data-driven, customer lifecycle email campaigns are designed to deliver messages to customers at a time that suits them. It’s an email marketing strategy based on the idea of delivering the right message to the right person at the right time, throughout the whole business cycle.

Marketers can adopt highly specific and targeted email marketing techniques, due to the sophisticated nature of data collection and ever-advancing developments within dotdigital’s Engagement Cloud. It’s time to make maximum impact.

Sending the same emails to
everyone on your list is wrong and hinders your growth

At any given time, each customer is at a different point in their relationship with your product or brand. Think of the customer’s lifecycle as a journey – everyone has their own journey in their own time. Rather than sending bulk generic emails to all your recipients, customer lifecycle emails are targeted to specific customers at crucial points in their own individual journey.

With the level
of advanced email tools available to date, batch-and-blast emails should be a very
small proportion of the emails you are sending. This mentality of quantity over
quality is no longer effective in today’s email marketing world.

Leaving behind the spray-and-pray mindset and focusing on lifecycle marketing is the key to increasing email ROI.

Customer lifecycle marketing is the key to increasing email ROI

Basing your
email campaigns on the customer lifecycle will produce better conversions,
because the email content targets the individual recipient. Even if your recipients
don’t convert right away, they’ll still find your emails valuable.

How you define your customer lifecycle is specific to you and your brand. The typical customer lifecycle includes these five stages:

1. Prospects

Prospects are people or companies who aren’t customers… yet. They fit in with your buyer persona and they’ve had a minimal level of interaction and engagement with your brand.

Make sure to encourage them to make their first purchase; incentivizing them with a discount always helps. Ensure you set up a welcome program to make that important great first impression.

Here are some nice welcome email ideas:

  • Nasty Gal prompts new contacts to check out the blog and connect on social.
  • Kate Spade’s compelling welcome message gives you four reasons to visit the online store.
  • FUNFIT welcomes new subscribers with a 15% off their first order along with useful CTAs.

2. Active customers

These are people who have already made at least one purchase. It can also apply to those who have made multiple purchases. I would recommend segmenting these customers into several groups based on their purchasing habits.

For example, you might split those who purchase seasonally separately to those who purchase weekly. You need to ensure you keep these customers engaged so they continue buying from you. Additionally, you should be sending these customers transactional emails and replenishment emails.

3. At-risk customers

I class at-risk customers as those who were previously active but whose behavior has since dwindled – i.e. they haven’t made a purchase in a while.

How you determine when a customer moves from ‘active’ to ‘at risk’ is entirely dependent on your products and customers.

If you’re an automotive online brand, you may only expect the customer to purchase once during their car’s lifespan. However, if you’re a women’s fashion brand you might place someone ‘at risk’ if they don’t make a purchase after 30-60 days.

Deliver tailored content to each segment

You need to turn these at-risk customers in to active customers before they lapse. I won’t sugar-coat this; it can be difficult to re-engage someone unless you know specifically why they lost interest.

In addition, one of the most effective ways to contact them is through email, which doesn’t help if they’ve learned to ignore your emails. Try and understand what caused the customers to disengage initially.

You can’t send every email subscriber the same content, you must segment based on their past interactions with your brand and deliver tailored content to each segment. Optimizing the frequency of your emails will also help so you don’t overwhelm your customers.

4. Lapsed customers

These are the customers who have long gone past the point they were supposed to make a purchase and don’t respond to your emails. You need to reactivate these customers. Like at-risk customers, I’d suggest running some win-back style email campaigns to turn lapsed customers in to active customers. It can be tough, but not impossible. Lapsed customers don’t work in our favor as they are further away from your brand. Trying to win back old customers will make you understand why it’s so important to keep your current ones!

And remember, acquiring a new customer can cost five times more than retaining an existing one. So, don’t let your customers drop off!

5. Advocates

Look after your advocates, for these are the people that not only purchase your products regularly, but also promote your brand – on social media or simply by word of mouth. They are at the height of the customer lifecycle.

You want to nurture and reward these customers, so they stay engaged and continue to promote for you. You may decide to send your advocates special content – make sure to include something exclusive in your emails to drive home the point that your recipients aren’t like your regular customers.

Here are a couple of ideas of loyalty-style emails:

  • Starbucks rewards customers with bonus stars when they buy coffee and extended happy hours.
  • Madewell thanks its customers for joining the Insider gang and outlines all the ‘just-for-you’ perks.

You need to map out your customer lifecycle and create emails for customers at each stage. This will improve your conversion rates and build a stronger brand following.

Although it may
require some time and resource for strategy and implementation, once set up, it
will deliver business results continuously. Your dotdigital account manager can
help with this – make sure you get in touch.

Want more great content? Check out the five key stages of lifecycle marketing automation here.

The post 5 stages of the customer lifecycle and which emails to send appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 3 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

7 ways to boost ecommerce emails with social proof

So, what if there were a way to increase email conversions and improve customer experience – all without changing anything about the product or the price? Social proof uses readily available content to boost ecommerce emails, without the need for discounts or elaborate creative.

Why you need social proof

Social proof is the phenomenon where we
imitate others in order to make the right decision. When you crave an outfit
you just saw on Instagram or choose a busy restaurant over the quieter one next
door, you’re experiencing the effects of social proof.

This isn’t just a psychological tactic to
influence shoppers. Research shows that consumers see social proof as a key part
of the buying process.

Here, we’ll explore two types of social proof you can use to improve the performance of bulk and triggered emails:

Peer social proof

When making a purchase, consumers look for
unbiased sources of information such as ratings,
reviews
, and photos of real people
using the product. This is also called user-generated content (UGC).

For shoppers, ratings and reviews are a
crucial part of the buying process. 61 percent of customers look for product
reviews when making a purchase, while more than half (56 percent) find star
ratings helpful, and 29 percent want content from other customers.

Brands and retailers can help customers make better, faster decisions by including user-generated social proof in emails.

Wisdom of the crowd

When faced with a lot of options, we prefer to
follow what other people like us are doing.

You can use popularity messaging (e.g. ‘50
people bought this today’) to highlight what fellow customers are viewing and
purchasing. This adds urgency, informs shoppers what’s trending, and makes
stock more desirable.

Popularity messaging doesn’t require users to generate content for you – you can let the data speak for itself!

Here are some easy ways to enhance ecommerce emails with social proof.

1. Triggered emails: build trust with star ratings

Shoppers often abandon their cart because they aren’t ready to make a final decision. Triggered cart and browse abandonment emails are an opportunity to reduce purchase anxiety by including star ratings from existing customers.

Above is a great example of how social proof
can add value to shopping recovery emails without hugely altering the creative.
Star ratings fit in naturally alongside other essential information like
product imagery and delivery cost. Including the number of ratings adds another
layer of trust.

In a small space, Glasses Direct provides customers with a wealth of information to feel confident about completing their order.

2. Triggered emails: reassure shoppers with product reviews

Customer reviews go one step further than star ratings, giving detailed information about a customer’s positive experience of your product. Shoppers can more easily come to a smart decision when they know how your products perform in real life.

This example from Emma Bridgewater shows how reviews can complement vital product information and nudge customers towards completing a purchase.

3. Triggered emails: increase urgency with product popularity

You can harness the effect of social proof in
triggered emails even without user generated content. Popularity messaging uses
readily available browse and purchase data to show what other customers are
doing in real time.

This reassures recipients that your products
are proving popular, and increases urgency by indicating that the item may sell
out.

Cottages.com uses viewing data in booking abandonment emails to ensure that customers don’t miss out on their desired property:

Bulk marketing emails are the perfect occasion
to keep customers informed about your top-rated items. This builds trust and
shows shoppers that you care about providing them with the best quality
products.

For added impact, suggestions can be filtered by the recipient’s favorite category, as in this great product recommendation email from Bed Bath & Beyond:

5. Bulk emails: drive engagement with customer reviews

Bulk marketing emails can have lower
conversion rates than triggered messages, as they are not a direct response to
customers’ actions on your website. This means you have to work harder to
persuade customers to click through.

Providing brief customer reviews in marketing emails can spark the interest of customers who weren’t actively shopping for your products. Here’s an example from Molton Brown:

6. Bulk emails: encourage urgency with trending products

Highlight trending items with popularity
messaging to build trust in your products.

This has a two-pronged effect of tapping into
consumers’ fear of missing out (“What if the product sells out?”) and desire to
follow a consensus (“Other people are buying it, so it must be good!”)

In this email, VioVet adds urgency with messaging showing how fellow customers are interacting with the products right now:

7. Bulk emails: Inspire shoppers with social media content

Social media feeds let shoppers see your
products in real-life situations, so they can make an informed decision.

User-generated images appeal to customers’
emotions: shoppers can imagine how they will feel once they own your products.

Social media feeds can also encourage micro
conversions: While recipients might not be ready to make a purchase, they could
be persuaded to follow your social channels for more inspiration.

This email from LaRedoute makes shoppers feel part of a tribe by encouraging them to share their style:

Getting started with social proof

To get started, you’ll need to use a trusted ratings and reviews provider to collect customer feedback. Make sure that you have the right tools to incorporate ratings and review content, popularity data, and social media feeds into emails in real time.

For maximum impact, incorporate social proof
on your website to inspire shoppers at every stage of the journey. Consider
using a dedicated real-time marketing platform to provide a joined-up customer
experience without investing too much resource.

Download
The Retail Social Proof Barometer
to discover five types of social proof shoppers look for when making a purchase
decision.

The post 7 ways to boost ecommerce emails with social proof appeared first on dotdigital blog.

Reblogged 4 months ago from blog.dotdigital.com

“Missing the Mark” – 10 ‘exemplary’ SPAM emails

When people talk about email, and instantly think of “spam”, it really bugs me. Email marketing is not spam; email marketing is an art form. It needs to be perfected. We want a Picasso or Rembrandt landing in the inbox, not the scribbles of an amateur.

However, there are some instances of email marketing malpractice that can all too easily result in brand messages being treated like spam content. Missing the mark with your subject lines, email creative and copy can see your reputation damaged and your deliverability rates plummet.

346.04 billion spam emails every day.

Consider the history of spam, and the impact it has on the email marketing industry; ReturnPath defines spam as unsolicited bulk email (UBE) or messages sent to many recipients without permission. They also state that “spam is in the eye of the beholder” and I wholeheartedly concur. How an email is defined really depends upon both the interpretation of the recipient and the intention of the sender. If your brand sends out mass batch-and-blast messages that contain little of value or relevance to a particular customer, then you could quickly be considered a ‘spammy’ sender.

There are so many things we – as email marketers – need to think about when sending out an email campaign. If you want to find out more about best practice tips to avoid the spam folder, check out our infographic.

In the interest of  exploring what not to do when trying to appeal to customers in the inbox (and for a little light-hearted entertainment), I’ve collected some prime examples of spam from my inbox –  which are, by definition, awful examples of email marketing. I’ve titled them with the email subject line:

  1. Tired of cleaning up cat pee?

This is my favourite. Am I tired of cleaning up cat pee? No. Do I even have a cat? No. This is a classic spam email; there is no template, the message is not relevant, I have not given consent to receive the email.

  1. Compression Panties Shape & Hide Excess Fat?

Huh?

  1. Home based woodworking business

Apparently, I can make 90,000 USD per annum by buying Jim’s “Wood Profit” guide. Only 8 slots left for that free bonus so I better click right away! Quintessentially spam. It’s also not great if there are on-going spelling errors in the content, such as in this email.

  1. Why eye surgery is unnecessary for eye floaters

I mean, why would I listen to a qualified professional such as my doctor? Of course I’m going to take the advice of an erroneous and unsolicited message that reminds me of conspiracy nutters on social media.

  1. No Guns, No Knives. What do you carry?

Apparently, a lot of people carry pepper spray to defend themselves (do they?). This email invites me to check out the “Stinger Tactical Pen” – supposedly I risk everything by not carrying it. Hmmm. Delete. Delete. Delete.

  1. How to get the blood flowing to your boner

According to a verified source (I’m undoubtedly convinced of its authenticity), a controversial pill saved this poor man’s marriage. His wife noticed he was “longer and thicker immediately” – excellent! The husband – evidently elated and overjoyed – carried on for hours that night. The next morning, he was “ready, willing and able” to go for round two and three. That’s super impressive I’d say – sign me up! Not.

  1. The closest thing to flying a REAL plane!

If you have ever dreamed of being a pilot, VirtualPilot3D will fulfil that dream. I actually have a fear of flying and have an irrational dislike for virtual games. I predict that 99.9% of recipients would rather be travelling somewhere exotic in first class than receiving this email they didn’t ask for.

  1. The definitive guide to removing nail fungus

Pass.

  1. Download 518 boat plans inside

I’m a twenty-something millennial living and working in London. Funnily enough, access to over 518 step-by-step boat plans videos and boat building guides, does not interest me. I can barely put IKEA furniture together.

  1. Mediate Like A Zen Monk…In Just 7 Minutes

I’ve done Yoga a couple of times and I absolutely love it. It’s a great way to unwind from the hectic bustle that is working life. Now, correct me if I’m wrong, but attempting to meditate [like a monk?] in 7 minutes not only sounds hypocritical, but stressful. I also highly doubt it will defeat any life problems I – or anyone else – may be facing. [Uproar amongst all the legitimate yoga teachers and/or monks].

I hope you’ve all laughed as much reading this blog as I have writing it. If you want to avoid the mistakes of these spammers and achieve 10/10 for your creative, content and data use, check out our 2017 Hitting the Mark benchmark report. 100 brands, +100 emails, and more insight than you can shake a stick at.

 

 

The post “Missing the Mark” – 10 ‘exemplary’ SPAM emails appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Australian retailers double the number of emails sent on Click Frenzy day

In fact, we saw the same amount of emails sent on Click Frenzy day as we did during 2015’s Cyber Monday!

If you’re new to Click Frenzy, it’s a 24-hour online shopping mega-sale that captures national attention in Australia. The electricals and tech-themed shopping day is the equivalent of Cyber Monday and takes place on the third Tuesday of November every year.

The original event is hosted on the members-only Click Frenzy site, however many Australian vendors are now jumping on the trend and holding sales on their own sites.

Some of the deals featured in year’s frenzy included Beats By Dre Studio Wireless headphones for $299, down from $479. And BONDS, the Australian clothing and underwear store, offered 40% off everything on its site.

Naturally, this time of the year is extremely busy for retailers and us here at dotmailer. Our sending volumes go through the roof, as you can imagine, so we’ve taken every step to ensure our customers’ emails make it to their own customers’ inboxes.

To put it into perspective, we’ve increased our bandwidth by a whopping 500% and doubled the number of mail servers we have, to cater for these kinds of sending peaks.

What’s more, our team have also been working hard to optimize the code that personalizes and sends our emails, which is improving performance by 40%.

That means we’re all set for this year’s Black Friday and Cyber Monday in just over a week’s time!

The post Australian retailers double the number of emails sent on Click Frenzy day appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

How abandoned cart emails will save your business

A good abandoned cart strategy includes emails that are sent to customers who begin shopping by adding items to their online shopping cart and then leave before the site finishes the order. These emails act as reminders to the customer of the value of your product (why they had placed these items in their cart to begin with), and encourage them to complete the transaction.

Reasons for shopping cart abandonment: The customer

  • The browser or tab accidentally crashes or closes
  • Loss of internet connection
  • The site timed out
  • The customer may have to unexpectedly leave the computer
  • The final price was unexpected after shipping and taxes were added
  • The customer decides he or she isn’t ready to purchase the product
  • Concerns about website security
  • The customer plans on purchasing the product later on
  • The customer is no longer interested

Reasons for shopping cart abandonment: The retailer

  • No guest check-out
  • Complicated, complex, or confusing web forms
  • Payment options are limited
  • Limited shipping methods
  • Technical issue with the webpage itself

How can abandoned cart emails help?

There is little a retailer can do to fix the problems that originate from the consumer’s end, making abandoned cart emails the most effective way to regain control. These emails will encourage your customers to try again, and by tracking conversion metrics, you will be able to pinpoint obstacles and trouble spots on your website over time. According to research, almost half of all abandoned cart emails are opened, and more than one third of those clicks leading to a purchase on the site. There’s just no doubt that abandoned cart emails have a high opening and conversion rate, so it’s in your company’s best interest to utilize them.

Getting started

The earlier your site collects the customer’s email address, the better. This way you will be able to reach out to your customers no matter how deep they’ve fallen into the ordering “funnel.” Some websites ask customers for a contact number, but most consumers find this practice intrusive coming from an online retailer.

Add a customer service number to the bottom of your email to make it easier for your customers to get in touch. The email should also include a link that redirects the customer back to their shopping cart.

Timing

The further a customer is in the ordering process, the sooner you should send an abandoned cart email. If the customer abandoned their cart relatively early, wait a few days before sending them a reminder. If you can, send more than one email. Try a tiered approach and send a series of automated emails – one within the first hour of cart abandonment, a second within 24 hours, and a final email at the 72-hour mark.

What to include

It’s important to open the email with a statement that lets the customer know why they’re receiving it. Keep it short, sweet, and to the point: Simply notify the customer that their transaction was not completed, then offer guidance back to their cart. Be sure to include contact information at the end of the email in case the customer has any unanswered questions.

Great copy is key

The abandoned cart email is sort of like a bonus marketing opportunity, which is why your marketing materials should be compelling and inviting. A well-constructed abandoned cart email will have an attention-grabbing subject line, errorless and engaging content, and a few high quality images.

A common reason for cart abandonment is due to an unexpected total once all of their items are in the cart. Oftentimes, customers forget to think about taxes and shipping costs. Encourage your customers to continue shopping by offering a discount. Just generate a discount code and pop it into the abandoned cart email.

An abandoned cart email has a higher chance of being opened and getting a customer to complete their transaction than any other marketing emails you send. Don’t give up on them at this crucial stage in the sale process, because more often than not their reason for not completing the purchase doesn’t actually indicate a lack of interest. All it takes is an effective abandoned cart strategy to get them back on track and becoming a loyal customer.

The post How abandoned cart emails will save your business appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Why Good Unique Content Needs to Die – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

We all know by now that not just any old content is going to help us rank in competitive SERPs. We often hear people talking about how it takes “good, unique content.” That’s the wrong bar. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand talks about where we should be aiming, and how to get there.

For reference, here’s a still of this week’s whiteboard. Click on it to open a high resolution image in a new tab!

Video transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about something that I really have a problem with in the SEO world, and that is the phrase “good, unique content.” I’ll tell you why this troubles me so much. It’s because I get so many emails, I hear so many times at conferences and events with people I meet, with folks I talk to in the industry saying, “Hey, we created some good, unique content, but we don’t seem to be performing well in search.” My answer back to that is always that is not the bar for entry into SEO. That is not the bar for ranking.

The content quality scale

So I made this content quality scale to help illustrate what I’m talking about here. You can see that it starts all the way up at 10x, and down here I’ve got Panda Invasion. So quality, like Google Panda is coming for your site, it’s going to knock you out of the rankings. It’s going to penalize you, like your content is thin and largely useless.

Then you go up a little bit, and it’s like, well four out of five searchers find it pretty bad. They clicked the Back button. Maybe one out of five is thinking, “Well, this is all right. This solves my most basic problems.”

Then you get one level higher than that, and you have good, unique content, which I think many folks think of as where they need to get to. It’s essentially, hey, it’s useful enough. It answers the searcher’s query. It’s unique from any other content on the Web. If you read it, you wouldn’t vomit. It’s good enough, right? Good, unique content.

Problem is almost everyone can get here. They really can. It’s not a high bar, a high barrier to entry to say you need good, unique content. In fact, it can scale. So what I see lots of folks doing is they look at a search result or a set of search results in their industry. Say you’re in travel and vacations, and you look at these different countries and you’re going to look at the hotels or recommendations in those countries and then see all the articles there. You go, “Yeah, you know what, I think we could do something as good as what’s up there or almost.” Well, okay, that puts you in the range. That’s good, unique content.

But in my opinion, the minimum bar today for modern SEO is a step higher, and that is as good as the best in the search results on the search results page. If you can’t consistently say, “We’re the best result that a searcher could find in the search results,” well then, guess what? You’re not going to have an opportunity to rank. It’s much, much harder to get into those top 10 positions, page 1, page 2 positions than it was in the past because there are so many ranking signals that so many of these websites have already built up over the last 5, 10, 15 years that you need to go above and beyond.

Really, where I want folks to go and where I always expect content from Moz to go is here, and that is 10x, 10 times better than anything I can find in the search results today. If I don’t think I can do that, then I’m not going to try and rank for those keywords. I’m just not going to pursue it. I’m going to pursue content in areas where I believe I can create something 10 times better than the best result out there.

What changed?

Why is this? What changed? Well, a bunch of things actually.

  • User experience became a much bigger element in the ranking algorithms, and that’s direct influences, things that we’ve talked about here on Whiteboard Friday before like pogo-sticking, and lots of indirect ones like the links that you earn based on the user experience that you provide and Google rendering pages, Google caring about load speed and device rendering, mobile friendliness, all these kinds of things.
  • Earning links overtook link building. It used to be you put out a page and you built a bunch of links to it. Now that doesn’t so much work anymore because Google is very picky about the links that it’s going to consider. If you can’t earn links naturally, not only can you not get links fast enough and not get good ones, but you also are probably earning links that Google doesn’t even want to count or may even penalize you for. It’s nearly impossible to earn links with just good, unique content. If there’s something better out there on page one of the search results, why would they even bother to link to you? Someone’s going to do a search, and they’re going to find something else to link to, something better.
  • Third, the rise of content marketing over the last five, six years has meant that there’s just a lot more competition. This field is a lot more crowded than it used to be, with many people trying to get to a higher and higher quality bar.
  • Finally, as a result of many of these things, user expectations have gone crazy. Users expect pages to load insanely fast, even on mobile devices, even when their connection’s slow. They expect it to look great. They expect to be provided with an answer almost instantaneously. The quality of results that Google has delivered and the quality of experience that sites like Facebook, which everyone is familiar with, are delivering means that our brains have rewired themselves to expect very fast, very high quality results consistently.

How do we create “10x” content?

So, because of all these changes, we need a process. We need a process to choose, to figure out how we can get to 10x content, not good, unique content, 10x content. A process that I often like to use — this probably is not the only one, but you’re welcome to use it if you find it valuable — is to go, “All right, you know what? I’m going to perform some of these search queries.”

By the way, I would probably perform the search query in two places. One is in Google and their search results, and the other is actually in BuzzSumo, which I think is a great tool for this, where I can see the content that has been most shared. So if you haven’t already, check out BuzzSumo.com.

I might search for something like Costa Rica ecolodges, which I might be considering a Costa Rica vacation at some point in the future. I look at these top ranking results, probably the whole top 10 as well as the most shared content on social media.

Then I’m going to ask myself these questions;

  • What questions are being asked and answered by these search results?
  • What sort of user experience is provided? I look at this in terms of speed, in terms of mobile friendliness, in terms of rendering, in terms of layout and design quality, in terms of what’s required from the user to be able to get the information? Is it all right there, or do I need to click? Am I having trouble finding things?
  • What’s the detail and thoroughness of the information that’s actually provided? Is it lacking? Is it great?
  • What about use of visuals? Visual content can often take best in class all the way up to 10x if it’s done right. So I might check out the use of visuals.
  • The quality of the writing.
  • I’m going to look at information and data elements. Where are they pulling from? What are their sources? What’s the quality of that stuff? What types of information is there? What types of information is missing?

In fact, I like to ask, “What’s missing?” a lot.

From this, I can determine like, hey, here are the strengths and weaknesses of who’s getting all of the social shares and who’s ranking well, and here’s the delta between me and them today. This is the way that I can be 10 times better than the best results in there.

If you use this process or a process like this and you do this type of content auditing and you achieve this level of content quality, you have a real shot at rankings. One of the secret reasons for that is that the effort axis that I have here, like I go to Fiverr, I get Panda invasion. I make the intern write it. This is going to take a weekend to build versus there’s no way to scale this content.

This is a super power. When your competitors or other folks in the field look and say, “Hey, there’s no way that we can scale content quality like this. It’s just too much effort. We can’t keep producing it at this level,” well, now you have a competitive advantage. You have something that puts you in a category by yourself and that’s very hard for competitors to catch up to. It’s a huge advantage in search, in social, on the Web as a whole.

All right everyone, hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of Whiteboard Friday, and we’ll see you again next week. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Reblogged 4 years ago from tracking.feedpress.it