Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience

As marketers, we want to influence our customers and clients to follow the path to conversion. But this can be a challenge for all of us – this is where Nathalie Nahai, the web psychologist, can help. She teaches global audiences about the link between behavioral sciences and the digital space, helping you build a better understanding of how to persuade your audience to take the desired path.

We were so impressed with Nathalie that we invited her to speak at this year’s dotmailer Summit where she’ll be bringing together the latest insights from the world of psychology, neuroscience and behavioral economics to explain the underlying dynamics and motivations behind consumer behavior.

In this blog we posed Nathalie a series of questions – read on to find out some secret hacks, interesting facts and a brief insight into what you’ll be taking away from the dotmailer Summit.

Get your ticket today because this is the one event you don’t want to miss.

Can you tell us a little more about yourself and how you found yourself drawn to web psychology – from what we’ve seen you have a really fascinating background, so it’ll be interesting to see who or what inspired you on your journey?

“Thank you, it’s been a rather unpredictable trajectory!”

“Having studied psychology at university, upon leaving I went straight to Central St Martins to explore fine art, something I have always had a passion for. During my time at CSM I’d been recording music on the side, and I thought it would come in handy to know how to develop websites to help promote myself. So, I went to some classes and as I progressed I ended up taking on freelance work.”

“I began thinking about joining a design agency, when a good friend of mine (who was just leaving agency life for something more entrepreneurial) suggested I hold off for a bit and explore some co-working spaces instead. I found a lovely place to work from where the organiser asked me to run some psychology-related workshops, and the penny started to drop. If psychology could shed light on the factors that influence our behaviours in the physical world, surely it could provide some insight into what shapes our decisions online, too.”

“I looked for books and postgraduate courses on the subject, but at the time I couldn’t find any resources that combined research from the fields of psychology, computer science, human-computer-interaction, marketing, ethics, cross-cultural studies, behavioural economics and UX (the latter two subjects having not yet hit the mainstream). Frustrated by the lack of an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach, I decided to write a book that would allow me to draw these threads together into something I would personally find useful to read, and after a couple of years of trawling through countless studies, Webs Of Influence was conceived – and that’s where it all started.”

What do you think the key messages are in what you do? And how to do you think you help to empower people?

“There are a few key messages in what I do… Firstly, we’re not rational agents and our decision-making is open to influence, both on- and off-line. Secondly, to understand and connect with people in a meaningful way, we have to understand their psychological context, which includes universal, cultural and individual differences. Thirdly – and this is the most important – we have an ethical responsibility to use these insights to create mutually beneficial experiences, which means being transparent (not using dark patterns), delivering on what we promise (providing real value), creating a great customer experience (building trust over time), and respecting people’s privacy (not using covert forms of tracking to follow, coerce or manipulate users into taking certain actions).”

Can you give a small indication into what you will be covering at the dotmailer Summit – perhaps the key takeaways people can expect to leave with?

“People can expect to leave with specific, actionable principles that they can use straight away to create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience that customers will want to come back to experience again.”

There has been a lot of talk recently about how our technology is impacting us and what we can do about it – have you got any key thoughts on this subject? And how you see this influencing our lives and our future?

“Yes I have a several thoughts on this! I think that the most important and pressing issue in this debate is having a space (or spaces) in which we can share, discuss and learn about what’s at stake, and what our choices might be for shaping the world in which we want to live.”

“We’re starting to see a greater interest in how technology can be designed and used to influence and manipulate behaviours, questions which, in my opinion, go to the heart of what it means to be human. Personally, I want to live in a society in which the individual is sovereign – we would own our own data by default and be able to choose with whom to share it, and we would be free from surveillance outside of public spaces – whether physically (via cameras and microphones in the home, or through biometric sensors which are fast becoming reality), or virtually (through the content we share and the activities we engage in online).”

What’s your favorite social medium to engage in?

“It used to be Twitter, but it feels as though it’s become so noisy that I now tend to engage more with Instagram, which I use to connect with a smaller, closer community.”

Any tips or hacks on what obvious mistakes sites make that discourage customers from buying?

“Yes – in a bid to stay on top of design trends, brands will often create websites, content and apps that look great but actually deflect attention away from the all-important call to action. A great example here is when brands use auto-playing videos on their websites – the motion will detract attention away from the CTA and will often lower conversion rates as a result. If you have to use video, reduce the amount of background motion that’s involved, so that users have the chance to locate and understand the call to action.”

Have you come across any interesting facts about global user behavior that you could share with us?

“Yes – high load times frustrate users no matter where they’re from! More seriously though, one of the most important factors that will impact the success of a business, is trust. If you can provide customers with something they value in a way that is frictionless and even joyful, not only will they be more likely to return to use your service and recommend you to their peers, they will also be more forgiving when you make mistakes – which in the amplified world of social media, can go a long way to protecting your reputation.”

And lastly has there been anything that has truly inspired you lately?

“Yes, although it’s on a completely different note! I’ve been studying academic drawing at Barcelona Academy of Art, and I’m finding the whole process extraordinary (if you want to check out some of my work you can find it here on Instagram).”


Thank you so much Nathalie for sharing some insights into web psychology, as well as some general inspiration. We’re looking forward to welcoming you on stage on the 19th April at the dotmailer Summit 2018.

You can find out more about the dotmailer Summit here, and for more consumer behavior insights, check out our email psychology whitepaper.

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