Omnichannel: 5 elements that encapsulate the experience of simultaneous engagement

Omnichannel experience is one of the big buzzwords in the business world for good reason. Offering an omnichannel experience to customers goes above and beyond a multichannel experience. The two are very similar, but there are some key differences.

Instead of simply offering customers multiple channels to make their experience more personalized, businesses are bringing these multiple channels together to work simultaneously. Here, we’re going to break down why this practice is important for your business and what elements encapsulate the omnichannel experience.

What is omnichannel?

The omnichannel experience brings multiple channels together for customers to use simultaneously. While it is mostly a marketing tool, it can easily and effectively trickle down to other aspects of business, especially customer experience. The simplest example of this might occur when a customer walks into a retail store looking for an item. They want to be in and out quickly, and there are no employees around. Instead of walking around the store looking for an employee to direct them to the item they need, they pull out their phone and go to the website to see a) if the item is at the store; b) if the item is in stock; c) how much the item costs; and d) what aisle the item is located in.

Rather than having to choose between ordering an item online or going to the store to buy the item yourself, you can do both simultaneously for a better experience. This could also apply to the experience of customer service. In an ideal omnichannel world, a shopper can speak to someone behind the desk while pulling up the item on their phone if, for example, there’s a price discrepancy at that particular location, or if the customer has a question about the return policy.

Omnichannel experiences help improve many aspects of customer experience. Sales, marketing, and customer service teams can all take advantage of what omnichannel brings to the table to drive ROI and increase brand loyalty.  

Elements of the omnichannel experience

Now that we’ve defined an omnichannel experience, we can talk about what actually goes into it, and why it differs from a multichannel experience.

Multiple channels

Offering an omnichannel experience requires multiple channels for customers to use. These channels are simply different ways for people to interact with your business. They could come in the form of a website, a brick-and-mortar store, an app, or a phone service. There are other ways businesses and customers can interact with each other, but the key to separating a multichannel experience from an omnichannel experience is that customers can use multiple channels simultaneously.

Channels Are used and updated regularly

One major problem with multichannel experiences is that, although they offer customers different ways of interacting with businesses, what often happens is that one channel isn’t as strong as the other and gets ignored. This can affect the efficiency of your ROI. If we go back to our original example of a person walking into a store and relying on the app to improve the experience, but the app doesn’t work, then the omnichannel experience becomes pointless and can even have detrimental effects.

Scalability

It’s not enough to update and use certain channels regularly. If you’re offering an app that lets users go back and forth between their computer, phone, and even a tablet, the website and app have to work together seamlessly — meaning there’s no loss of information, the channel easy to navigate, and buttons and menus actually work. Multichannel solutions are often not fit for purpose because some channels are better than others. Omnichannel solutions look to take the best from each channel to provide an all-round positive experience.

Combining online and offline channels

This is especially important for retail stores and e-commerce websites who either spend all day face-to-face with customers or never see who they actually are. Let’s say you’re looking for an item and can’t find it on the shelves. You look to the app and see that they have it in stock. You go find an employee to ask if they have any more of the items in the back, and they immediately tell you no because they checked before. Instead of leaving the store defeated, you can show them the app and correct their mistake. Disney provides a prime example of this with its omnichannel guest experience.

If you’re an ecommerce business, and customers have a problem with their order, it’s important to offer omnichannel customer support so they can reach you via email, phone, via a form on your website – or even on social channels like Facebook Messenger and Whatsapp. If a customer has a negative experience and they have no one to engage with to rectify their issue, they’re going to think your only concern is taking their money. This kind of experience can drastically hamper your brand’s reputation – and ultimately your bottom line.

What about social media?

Social media plays an important role in the omnichannel experiencesbecause social media itself is an omnichannel experience. Let me explain. If you’re marketing on social media, that usually includes incorporating more than one platform. Think of platforms as channels: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc. If your business uses Instagram primarily, change the settings so posts also go live on Facebook and Twitter. That way, you’re more likely to reach customers earlier. Plus, you’ll expand your reach to audiences that only use one platform over the other. When social media is one of the channels you use in your omnichannel experience, you achieve omnichannel inception. Who doesn’t want that?

Final thoughts

Omnichannel experiences are an absolute essential for businesses. In fact, 73 percent of consumers are already using more than one channel for shopping. The key is to bring these channels together into one 360 degree marketing strategy. The best part about the omnichannel experience is that it’s adaptable to multiple departments; customer support, sales, and marketing can all take advantage of the channels they’re already offering customers. Sophisticated, personalized customer experiences are the new standard going forward; if you haven’t taken advantage of this yet, it’s time you start.

Check out our resources page for free cheatsheets on your marketing challenges

 

The post Omnichannel: 5 elements that encapsulate the experience of simultaneous engagement appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

How to use rewards data to improve your customer experience

As eCommerce retailers find it more time-consuming and expensive to generate new customers, they are increasingly looking to their loyalty programs. And customers are certainly eager to sign up. In 2017, there were 3.8 billion memberships of loyalty programs in the US alone.

But overall growth has also slowed. Many retailers are struggling to retain members. They’re also finding it difficult to prompt them to take meaningful actions like make purchases and send referrals.

So what’s the solution?

One option is to use data derived from your rewards program to improve the experience of those who have signed up.

By leveraging a number of data-points, you can build a program that boosts engagement while also driving a number of key metrics, like purchase frequency, average order value, referrals, lifetime value and more.

In this post, we’re going to identify the most important types of data and how to use that data to create meaningful changes.

What data can you generate from a rewards program?

 

  • Segmentation dataThis is data about the demographic makeup of your loyalty program membership, and encompasses age, location, marital status, gender etc.
  • Reward-specific dataWhich rewards, promotions and giveaways are most popular? Determining which products and voucher codes are redeemed most often is usually a relatively simple process.
  • Membership activityActivity refers to the degree to which your members are interacting with your program. How many points have they redeemed? How many have been left sitting? How many vouchers have been used? This data is immensely useful for deciding which members to prioritize.
  • Personal detailsThis is individual data that you have extracted on the basis of membership of your loyalty program. It can include birth dates, reward preferences, specific location and so on.

 

So how do you get started? Here are four data-based ways to improve the customer experience of members of your loyalty program.

1. Segment rewards by activity and demographics

 

Segmentation works for both VIP members, who have high purchase frequency and regularly redeem their points, and for members that do not exhibit a high level of engagement.

For your top members, offering high-value rewards will encourage engagement with your program over the long term. By picking and contacting certain groups, and even individuals, for exclusive rewards, you can provide the best possible incentives in a cost-effective way.

Showcasing unique rewards and giveaways via email to members that are inactive, under-engaged or sitting on a large number of unredeemed points will also further increase retention among those most likely to drop off. It’s usually viable to allocate extra resources to this segment because they represent a high-potential group – they’re existing customers who have already signed up – with the greatest contribution to your overall churn rate.

Segmentation can also work effectively when unique promotions and rewards are designed on the basis of demographic information like age, location, marital status etc. By tailoring reward initiatives to meet the unique preferences and needs of specific sections of your customer base, you are much more likely to drive action (and thus engagement). Amazon used this strategy to immense success by targeting students for its Prime program.

2. Create highly personalized initiatives

Personalized reward initiatives

 

Personalization is a hugely under-leveraged strategy. It’s one thing to include a personal name at the beginning of an email. It’s another to encourage members to enter the birth dates of family members at sign-up and use that information to send tailored discounts and offers in the run-up to the big event.

Most managers responsible for running loyalty programs don’t take advantage of the huge array of personal details at their disposal. Customer experience can be dramatically improved when you tailor email promotions and rewards to include personalizaton; think relevant buying holidays (such as Mother’s or Valentine’s Day), personal celebrations, specific genders, locations and so on.

We’re not talking about general demographic or segmentation data here, but rather individual-specific details that you can use to automate highly targeted promotions or reward offers.

An added benefit of sending these highly personalized rewards is that they will increase trust over the long term. If you send your customers free points via email on their birthday or favorite shopping holiday, particularly when your competitors don’t, you’re much more likely to stand out.

3. Tailor your program to preferred platforms

Tailor your programs

 

Which platforms are your members using to check and redeem their points? Data about the kinds of devices and channels your customers prefer can be useful for deciding which platforms to prioritize.

If, for example, the majority of your eCommerce visitors shop on mobile, it makes sense to make your loyalty program directly available through mobile devices. Research by Exodus shows that 31% of consumers use an app to manage their loyalty rewards, so there is clearly a preference for certain access-points.

Most loyalty program managers take an omni-channel approach. And while this is certainly a laudable strategy, it usually falls short. The key is to hone in and optimize those channels that are most effective at engaging your membership.

4. Build feedback into your program

Build program feedback

 

Do you have any feedback mechanisms in place to determine unserved needs and pain points among your members?

Indirect feedback exists in the form of data about your most popular rewards and promotions. You can use this information when creating new rewards or putting together future promotions. If, for example, most members swap their points for cash-back rewards, then you can offer variants and similar offers going forward.

But it’s also important to utilize other ways of collecting feedback. How often do you send email surveys to your loyalty members or include survey questions on your rewards pages? Are you listening to customer service recordings? Do you undertake user testing?

This is one of the big reasons that retailers often experience high rates of churn. They apply a rigorous set of methods to pinpoint customer needs and pains related to the buying process but none to the customer experience of their loyalty program members, where a unique set of issues are often present. If you want to boost retention, it’s vital that you listen closely to your existing members.

Conclusion: Loyalty programs are a powerful but underutilized tool

Loyalty programs are so popular among eCommerce retailers because they work. But it’s also vital to keep in mind that the market is incredibly saturated. The average American is a member of over 14 programs.

As ad costs soar and search engine traffic becomes scarcer, holding onto your existing customers is ever more important. This is why a data-driven approach to improving the customer experience of your loyalty program will almost certainly be relevant.

On the one hand, it will enable you to generate concrete insights for reducing churn. On the other, you have an opportunity to create a key competitive advantage by building a rewards program that is genuinely based on customer needs and preferences.

Now, time to start mining that data.


This is a guest post written by Skubana. Skubana provides an omni-channel eCommerce platform for unifying all aspects of your store’s operation. Skubana’s tools make it easy to manage inventory and shipping, automate laborious tasks and generate meaningful insights from on and off-site data.

 

The post How to use rewards data to improve your customer experience appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

dotmailer receives ‘Great User Experience’ title for email marketing software – from reputable business software directory

Leading business software directory FinancesOnline believes businesses and organizations can highly benefit from an email automation marketing platform that is both feature-rich and easy to use. FinancesOnline’s experts found this in dotmailer, thus they gave us a positive 8.8 score and bestowed to us their prestigious Great User Experience and Rising Star awards.

 

The Great User Experience and Rising Star recognition for online email marketing software is given to systems that have satisfied clients with well-designed functionalities alongside a user-friendly and intuitive interface. This can be attributed to dotmailer’s unique drag-and-drop template builder that allow users to effortlessly create impressive email templates within a few minutes. It was also one of the reasons why our solution was recommended in the platform’s ‘what is email marketing software’ guide.

 

FinancesOnline believes dotmailer’s throng of functionalities enables users to remain “on top of every single phase of their email marketing campaigns and other related activities.” Aside from easily creating emails, FinancesOnline said our software can help users “fully optimize their email marketing strategies and get the best results” through various services including, but not limited to, campaign management, creative studio and strategic services. With these, users can significantly boost click-through rates and grow their business.

 

Businesses are also safeguarded with dotmailer’s scalability and custom-built integrations. “As your business needs develop and become more demanding and diverse, dotmailer is more than capable of growing with your enterprise,” wrote FinancesOnline’s experts.

The post dotmailer receives ‘Great User Experience’ title for email marketing software – from reputable business software directory appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 5 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience

As marketers, we want to influence our customers and clients to follow the path to conversion. But this can be a challenge for all of us – this is where Nathalie Nahai, the web psychologist, can help. She teaches global audiences about the link between behavioral sciences and the digital space, helping you build a better understanding of how to persuade your audience to take the desired path.

We were so impressed with Nathalie that we invited her to speak at this year’s dotmailer Summit where she’ll be bringing together the latest insights from the world of psychology, neuroscience and behavioral economics to explain the underlying dynamics and motivations behind consumer behavior.

In this blog we posed Nathalie a series of questions – read on to find out some secret hacks, interesting facts and a brief insight into what you’ll be taking away from the dotmailer Summit.

Get your ticket today because this is the one event you don’t want to miss.

Can you tell us a little more about yourself and how you found yourself drawn to web psychology – from what we’ve seen you have a really fascinating background, so it’ll be interesting to see who or what inspired you on your journey?

“Thank you, it’s been a rather unpredictable trajectory!”

“Having studied psychology at university, upon leaving I went straight to Central St Martins to explore fine art, something I have always had a passion for. During my time at CSM I’d been recording music on the side, and I thought it would come in handy to know how to develop websites to help promote myself. So, I went to some classes and as I progressed I ended up taking on freelance work.”

“I began thinking about joining a design agency, when a good friend of mine (who was just leaving agency life for something more entrepreneurial) suggested I hold off for a bit and explore some co-working spaces instead. I found a lovely place to work from where the organiser asked me to run some psychology-related workshops, and the penny started to drop. If psychology could shed light on the factors that influence our behaviours in the physical world, surely it could provide some insight into what shapes our decisions online, too.”

“I looked for books and postgraduate courses on the subject, but at the time I couldn’t find any resources that combined research from the fields of psychology, computer science, human-computer-interaction, marketing, ethics, cross-cultural studies, behavioural economics and UX (the latter two subjects having not yet hit the mainstream). Frustrated by the lack of an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach, I decided to write a book that would allow me to draw these threads together into something I would personally find useful to read, and after a couple of years of trawling through countless studies, Webs Of Influence was conceived – and that’s where it all started.”

What do you think the key messages are in what you do? And how to do you think you help to empower people?

“There are a few key messages in what I do… Firstly, we’re not rational agents and our decision-making is open to influence, both on- and off-line. Secondly, to understand and connect with people in a meaningful way, we have to understand their psychological context, which includes universal, cultural and individual differences. Thirdly – and this is the most important – we have an ethical responsibility to use these insights to create mutually beneficial experiences, which means being transparent (not using dark patterns), delivering on what we promise (providing real value), creating a great customer experience (building trust over time), and respecting people’s privacy (not using covert forms of tracking to follow, coerce or manipulate users into taking certain actions).”

Can you give a small indication into what you will be covering at the dotmailer Summit – perhaps the key takeaways people can expect to leave with?

“People can expect to leave with specific, actionable principles that they can use straight away to create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience that customers will want to come back to experience again.”

There has been a lot of talk recently about how our technology is impacting us and what we can do about it – have you got any key thoughts on this subject? And how you see this influencing our lives and our future?

“Yes I have a several thoughts on this! I think that the most important and pressing issue in this debate is having a space (or spaces) in which we can share, discuss and learn about what’s at stake, and what our choices might be for shaping the world in which we want to live.”

“We’re starting to see a greater interest in how technology can be designed and used to influence and manipulate behaviours, questions which, in my opinion, go to the heart of what it means to be human. Personally, I want to live in a society in which the individual is sovereign – we would own our own data by default and be able to choose with whom to share it, and we would be free from surveillance outside of public spaces – whether physically (via cameras and microphones in the home, or through biometric sensors which are fast becoming reality), or virtually (through the content we share and the activities we engage in online).”

What’s your favorite social medium to engage in?

“It used to be Twitter, but it feels as though it’s become so noisy that I now tend to engage more with Instagram, which I use to connect with a smaller, closer community.”

Any tips or hacks on what obvious mistakes sites make that discourage customers from buying?

“Yes – in a bid to stay on top of design trends, brands will often create websites, content and apps that look great but actually deflect attention away from the all-important call to action. A great example here is when brands use auto-playing videos on their websites – the motion will detract attention away from the CTA and will often lower conversion rates as a result. If you have to use video, reduce the amount of background motion that’s involved, so that users have the chance to locate and understand the call to action.”

Have you come across any interesting facts about global user behavior that you could share with us?

“Yes – high load times frustrate users no matter where they’re from! More seriously though, one of the most important factors that will impact the success of a business, is trust. If you can provide customers with something they value in a way that is frictionless and even joyful, not only will they be more likely to return to use your service and recommend you to their peers, they will also be more forgiving when you make mistakes – which in the amplified world of social media, can go a long way to protecting your reputation.”

And lastly has there been anything that has truly inspired you lately?

“Yes, although it’s on a completely different note! I’ve been studying academic drawing at Barcelona Academy of Art, and I’m finding the whole process extraordinary (if you want to check out some of my work you can find it here on Instagram).”

 

Thank you so much Nathalie for sharing some insights into web psychology, as well as some general inspiration. We’re looking forward to welcoming you on stage on the 19th April at the dotmailer Summit 2018.

You can find out more about the dotmailer Summit here, and for more consumer behavior insights, check out our email psychology whitepaper.

The post Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 7 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Opportunities to improve your ecommerce site search experience

Opportunities to improve your ecommerce site search experience

 

The way we use the internet, including on ecommerce stores, is changing rapidly. More and more of us are choosing to shop online using our tablets and smartphones, rather than desktop computers. This, coupled with a gradual moving away from category-based menu systems, is bringing search into the spotlight, as consumers demand a quick and easy way to find exactly what they are looking for when shopping online. This is even more applicable on mobile devices.

As a result, growing numbers of retailers are starting to realise the potential that a strong, feature-rich search solution has for their business, and are exploring ways in which their own search offering can be overhauled to provide a better customer experience. In this article, we look at some of the ways that ecommerce site search can be improved, in order to bring it up to date with the latest developments in search technology and best practice.

1.   Implement an NLP-based search tool

Natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning are taking the ecommerce world by storm, shaking up various functions of an online store, including search, product recommendations and merchandising. More advanced, enterprise-level search solutions, like Klevu, use NLP to understand more about the query, in order to match results more accurately.

In search, natural language processing is used to understand more about the query, allowing the technology to answer what are essentially more complex asks. An example of a query that NLP would help with could be “salmon coloured backpack with a front pocket” – in this instance, Klevu would extract the data and use NLP to understand the key variables in the query and match to the terms that are used in catalog.

This context-driven, meaning-based approach of NLP means that search results are finally relevant to the customer’s search phrase. Clearly, the more accurate that search results become, the more likely the customer is to find what they want and actually make a purchase. The benefits go way beyond that initial purchase though, as a happy customer quickly becomes a loyal customer, returning again and again to a site that they feel really understands them as an individual.

Promote the use of your search function

From what we’ve seen with our clients, the use of on-site search has risen in recent years (generally around 10% – 25% of all users, depending on the prominence of the search box and the nature of the store), due in part to the growth in mobile internet usage. Despite this and the reports available in web analytics platforms (which generally show an uplift in search-led user journeys), it’s surprising to see that many online retailers are not positioning their search box more prominently – especially given that many of the market-leading merchants position search as a primary navigation option (eBay, AO.com, John Lewis, Amazon).

A prominent, bold search box that is clearly defined and easy to find could make a considerable difference for many retailers, helping users to find their desired product(s) quicker. Using language that encourages users to search, such as “search by product name, code, category or type” rather than a tiny magnifying glass icon, could also make a big impact. This is important on desktop, but far more so on mobile, as finding products via categories can be laboursome and increase the time to purchase considerably.

Include content search in results

When a visitor uses the search function on an ecommerce site, they could be at any stage in their purchasing journey. Some will be ready to commit to a purchase, others will be at the start of their journey, and could be looking for information about the product or about the store they are visiting. Including content pages in site search results can improve the customer experience for these early-stage customers, by giving them the information they are asking for. A search for ‘delivery’ or ‘returns’ should show the store’s delivery and returns pages, rather than some random products that somehow happen to have a keyword match, or no results at all.

Similarly, showing size guides, detailed specifications, product reviews, blog content and even buying guides could really help convert that information-hungry potential customer. Content search is not common on ecommerce stores currently, but it’s something that is gaining traction, as search tools become richer and more customer-focussed.

Use a good auto-suggest / predictive search

When a customer searches on an ecommerce store, they are generally trying to find something quickly. By adding ‘as-you-type’ product and category suggestions into the store’s search function, you are able to speed up that search dramatically. If the search is powered by an NLP-driven solution, product and category suggestions are likely to be accurate and highly relevant and can serve results that aren’t purely based on the keywords being used.

People inevitably make typing mistakes, or are unfamiliar with the spelling of brand names or products. Auto-suggest can kick in to present likely results after just three or four characters are typed into the search box. This reduces the potential for errors and speeds up access to results, with the end result being that the customer moves closer to a successful purchase transaction.

Implement a rich search interface

Using auto-suggest is just one part of a trend towards speeding up the search experience. Introducing a richer ‘quick results’ interface for search is another way that results can be presented more efficiently and faster to the customer. These panels will typically show thumbnails of the first few results, along with a link to view all results.

However, progressive retailers are also including links to relevant categories, content links, and even faceted search options in their dropdowns. This approach in a lot of cases takes the entire search process into the drop-down panel, removing or reducing the need for the traditional search results page. Redsgear.com, an outdoor gear specialist, has a great example of a rich search dropdown that also features infinite scroll to show all results.

Merchandise your results

Assuming an NLP-driven engine has been adopted to power search results for a site, the next step is to merchandise those results, to drive the maximum volume of sales. Search merchandising is made up of a number of component parts, but the key one for the more advanced merchants is around weighting the results.

A key requirement, especially for merchants with larger product catalogs, is the ability to weight key products, attributes and categories to ensure that the best products for the user and the business are being served. An example of this could be a fashion retailer weighting their top-selling products and also boosting a ‘summer’ attribute when they’re going into the new season, meaning their summer products will be promoted for their chosen queries.
One of the key features of Klevu is its self-learning technology, which adds a layer of boosting based on how users interact with results. As an example, if lots of users are clicking through and purchasing a specific product, this will be displayed higher for the relevant queries. The key drivers for this are purchases, ‘add to carts’ and clicks, which can make a big difference to the relevance and quality of results, particularly for longer-tail queries.

Improve zero results page

For stores using traditional keyword-driven search tools, the zero results page is an all-too-familiar occurrence and, be it far less, it still exists when using the most advanced technologies. Rather than simply stating ‘No results found’ or even suggesting that the customer has somehow made a mistake, a better approach is to try to salvage something from the situation and encourage the user to continue their journey.

We generally recommend that merchants display links to the most popular results and even a product recommendations block.

Analyse search data to improve product listings

We’ve focused so far on design and functional changes that can improve the search experience for online shoppers. One other key opportunity is in the area of search reporting and analytics. By examining site search statistics on a regular basis, it should be possible to make significant, material improvements to a store’s product catalog.

Identifying repeat searches that have a low conversion rate, despite there being an obvious set of products that should be converting for those phrases, could allow retailers to address issues in the product listings for those items. Products may have weak listings that could be improved, links to size guides might be added, or the product in question may have inventory errors that need to be corrected, which are preventing customers from buying those items. Analysing the poor performers in this way should provide trading opportunities for the store, and should also improve the customer experience over the long term, as they find it easier to locate the items they are looking for.
We’ll be doing a follow-up post around understanding the value of search in the coming months.

For ecommerce stores, it can be hard to reach decisions on how and where to invest in third party systems, for maximum ROI. Looking at on-site search, however, could actually prove to be one of the most beneficial strategic decisions that a retailer could make, and could potentially generate substantial long-term improvements, by way of increased conversion rates, order values and repeat transactions, as well as optimised user journeys.

The post was written by Paul Rogers, who works for Klevu. Klevu is a leading eCommerce search solution, which offers a wide range of advanced features for mid-level and enterprise-level online retailers, including natural language processing, self-learning capabilities, advanced merchandising & boosting rules and in-depth reporting. Klevu can be used alongside any eCommerce platform and they have direct, plug-and-play solutions for Magento 1, Magento 2 and Shopify.

The post Opportunities to improve your ecommerce site search experience appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

5 stats that’ll help you understand your customer’s omnichannel experience

It seems like just yesterday when the key behind winning customers was in the quality of your products or services. How times have changed. Any marketer will tell you, today’s prime drive to success lies in the ‘customer experience’. And in 2016, at the heart of this is the omnichannel journey today’s savvy customer travels on.

To continue fulfilling the evolving needs and expectations of the modern consumer, retailers need to meet them across all channels. Omnichannel retailing is no longer a ‘nice-to-have’ — it’s a must-have for any online retailer.

Multi v omni

Let’s be clear, it’d be an expensive faux pas to think your multichannel provisions have your omnichannel requirements covered. In fact, both may have the same touchpoints on their lists, but it’s in the interaction between, and reliance on each channel, where omni comes into its own.

Omnichannel has at its heart the knowledge that most customers navigate between many touchpoints to make a purchase. It recognises the consumer’s leaning to explore various channels, and places them – their lifestyle, problems, needs, and desires – at the heart of the strategy. The aim is for the matrix of channels to work seamlessly together, to provide a positive brand experience – and to drive purchasing.

Historically retailers have fallen behind their customers when it comes to the changing landscape of how they shop. The reality is, where once there were two or three touch-points they’d meet with, now there’s an average of 4 or 5. From the smartphone under the pillow, to the desktop in the office – recognising your customer’s experience is a journey involving a multitude of devices and platforms really is vital in today’s competitive market.

Omnichannel retailing creates a more positive sentiment for the brand, leading to better word of mouth marketing and sales, across multiple channels. It’s a lot to take on board for those just starting out on their omnichannel development – but in amongst the plethora of information out there, here are 5 stats that should help offer clarity.

Stat #1: If you’ve got an omnichannel customer engagement strategy, you’ll retain 89% of your customers[1]

And without, it’s 33%. So, let’s start with this one, just for any doubters who are wondering if they can go head-in-the-sand over omnichannel. Sorry, no. That’s 56% of your custom you’re risking if you do.

What’s more, research shows that omnichannel consumers are likely to spend up to 25% more. This increase comes as a result of optimized cross-selling and upselling achieved only by capturing information that tracks the customers in real-time across all channels.

Stat # 2: People spend an average of 2 hours a day browsing the internet on their smartphones[2]

It was last year that saw the balance tip, before then it was our desktops and laptops that held the accolade for most time spent online. And so it’s inevitable that more and more of the moments across the customer journey are happening right there. Whether it’s performing a search, opening an app, visiting a website or watching a video, people turn to their phone to get answers and, increasingly to take action.

As well as making sure sites are developed for mobile optimization, there’s also a psychological factor that wise retailers will consider: Smartphones are personal. In fact, around 66% of us have one within reach right now. They’re in our pockets, on our kitchen tables at dinner and, admit it, they’re even in our beds. Not delivering a seamless mobile experience is unforgivable – and your customer’s journey will come to an abrupt end if your mobile site isn’t up to scratch – they certainly won’t take to their desktop to find your comfort zone.

Stat #3: 56% of customers use a mobile device to price compare[3]

If helping your competitor out is the objective in mind, then make this price-comparison factor cumbersome. In fact, 43% of consumers will visit a competitor’s site next, after a negative mobile browsing experience.

Interestingly, much of this price comparison occurs when the customer is in the bricks-and-mortar store, connecting online research with in store buying is an essential tactic for today’s buyer. Savvy customers will search online for offers, vouchers, discounts whilst in stores – all to make sure they’re getting the best deal out there.

Stat #4: 75% of customers online will give details that’ll increase a retailer’s understanding of them[4]

Combining channels makes for a more complete view of the customer – who they are, what makes them tick – allowing for the holy grail – bespoke, tailored, personalised marketing. Customers are regularly asked for postcodes, emails, birthdays and other information, and this data can be compiled along with customer preferences for search words and more.

There’s a plethora of tools claiming to hold the keys to this “me-commerce” nirvana. And as successful big-brand online retailers have come to master the art of personalisation, the expectations of consumers have increased drastically.

Retailers need to use insights to drive specific objectives for each customer – across all touchpoints – engaging customers and giving them what they want, when they want it. For instance, there’s navigational personalisation, based on browser behaviour, and predictive personalisation – the “if you like this, you might also like…” route.

Stat # 5: 25% of shoppers who use their mobile devices in stores, make a purchase on their mobile devices whilst there[5]

Retailers now know their biggest challenge is to merge the digital and physical selling worlds into one seamless customer experience, and this stat is the epitome of this. The purchases that occur this way include products that aren’t in stock, those in a size currently unavailable in a specific store, or, and most painfully perhaps, those on other retailer’s site – where the customer’s found the same or similar item at a better price.
So even for those customers for which the lure of the high-street still holds true, technology, especially mobile, is having an impact on the store experience – changing the shopper’s path to purchase, and calling retailers to up their game and clinch the sale in store, before their customer grabs their beloved phone.

This guest post was written by JH.

 

[1] Sessioncam customer engagement stats

[2] Ofcom

[3] Ofcom

[4] Accenture

[5] Internet Retailer

The post 5 stats that’ll help you understand your customer’s omnichannel experience appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

How Your Brand Can Create an Enviable Customer Experience for Mobile Web Searchers

Posted by ronell-smith

Not very edible corned beef hash

Here I am, seated in a Manhattan, New York restaurant, staring at corned beef hash that looks and tastes like what I imagine dog food to look and taste like.

I’m pissed for two reasons:

  • It cost nearly $25 and was entirely inedible
  • I should have known better given the visuals depicted after doing a Google image search to find the dish, which was offered at a nearby restaurant

In retrospect, I should have checked A and B on my phone before ordering the $25 plate of Alpo. And though I didn’t do that, other would-be customers will, which means the business owner or SEO had better follow the steps below if they wish to stay in business.

The bad news is I no longer relish the thought of eating at high-end NY restaurants; the good news is this experience totally reshaped the way I view mobile, opening my eyes to simple but very effective tactics businesses of all types can immediately put to use for their brands.

My mobile education

We’ve all heard how mobile is transforming the web experience, reshaping the landscape for marketers, brands and consumers.

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As marketers, we now have to account for how our content will be accessed and consumed on mobile devices, whether that’s a phone, tablet or phablet. As brands, we realize our efforts will be judged not only on how well or high we show up in the SERPs, but also on much we can delight the on-the-go prospect who needs information that’s (a) fast, (b) accurate and (c) available from any device.

As prospects and consumers, we’ve come to know and value customer experience in large part because brands that use mobile to deliver what we need when we need it and in a way that’s easily consumed, have earned our attention — and maybe even our dollars.

But that’s where the similarities seemingly end. Marketers and brands seem to get so wrapped up in the technology (responsive design, anyone?) they forget that, at the end of the day, prospects want what they want right now — in the easiest-to-access way possible.

I’ve come to believe that, while marketers appreciate the overall value of mobile, they have yet to realize how, for customers, it’s all about what it allows them to accomplish.

At the customer/end-user level it’s not about mobile-friendly or responsive design; it’s about creating an enviable customer experience, one web searchers will reward you for with traffic, brand mentions and conversions.

I was alerted to the prominence of mobile phone use by noticing how many people sit staring at their phones while out at dinner, even as family members and friends are seated all around them. “How rude,” I thought. Then I realized it wasn’t only the people at restaurants; it’s people everywhere: walking down the street, driving (sadly and dangerously), sitting in movie theaters, at work, even texting while they talk on the phone.

One of my favorite comments with regard to mobile’s dominance comes with the Wizard of Moz himself, when he shared this tweet and accompanying image last year:

But my “aha!” moment happened last year, in Manhattan, during the corned beef hash episode.

After working until brunch, I…

  1. Opened iPhone to Google
  2. Typed “Best corned beef hash near me”
  3. Scanned list of restaurant by distance and reviews
  4. Selected the closest restaurant having > 4-star review ratings
  5. Ended up disappointed

That’s when it hit me that I’d made errors of omission at every step, in large part by leaving one very important element out of the process, but also by not thinking like a smart web user.

Normally my process is as follows, when I wish to enjoy a specific meal while traveling:

  1. Open iPhone to Google Search box
  2. Type “Best _________ near me”
  3. Scan list of restaurants by distance and reviews
  4. Select restaurant having > 4-star review rating but has excellent reviews (> 4.5) of the dish I want and has great images of the dish online
  5. Delight ensues

That’s when three things occurred to me like a brickbat to the noggin’:

  • This is a process I use quite often and is one that has proved quite foolproof
  • It’s undoubtedly a process many other would-be customer are using to identify desirable products and services
  • Marketers can reverse-engineer the process to bring the customers they’re hoping for to their doors or websites.

(Eds. note: This post was created with small business owners (single or multiple location), or those doing Local SEO for SMBs, in mind, as I hope to inform them of how many individuals think about and use mobile, and how the marketers can get in front of them with relevant content. Also, I’d like to thank Cindy Krum of Mobile Moxie for encouraging me to write this post, and Local SEO savant Phil Rozek of Local Visibility System for making sure I colored within the lines.)

Five ways to create an enviable customer experience on mobile

#1 — Optimize your images

Image optimization is the quintessential low-hanging fruit of online marketing: easy to accomplish but typically overlooked.

For our purposes, we aren’t so much making them “mobile-friendly” as we are making them search-friendly, increasing the likelihood that Google’s crawlers can better decipher what they contain and deliver them for the optimal search query.

First and foremost, do not use a stock image if your goal is for searchers to find, read and enjoy your content. Just don’t. Also, given how much of a factor website speed is, minify your images to ensure they don’t hamper page speed load times.

But the three main areas I want us to focus on are file name, alt text and title text, and captions. My standard for each is summed up very well in a blog post from Ian Lurie, who proposes an ingenious idea:

The Blank Sheet of Paper Test: If you wrote this text on a piece of paper and showed it to a stranger, would they understand the meaning? Is this text fully descriptive?

With this thinking in mind, image optimization becomes far simpler:

  • File name: We’re all adults here — don’t be thickheaded and choose something like “DSC9671 . png” when “cornedbeefhash . jpg” clearly works better.
  • Alt text and title text: Given that, in Google’s eyes, these two are the priorities, you must make certain they’re as descriptive as possible. Clearly list what the image is and/or contains without weighing it down with unneeded text. Using the corned beef hash from above as a example, “corned beef hash with minced meat” would be great, but “corned beef hash with minced meat and diced potatoes” would work better, alerting me that the dish isn’t what I’m looking for. (I prefer shredded beef and shredded potatoes.)
  • Caption: Yes, I know these aren’t necessary for every post, but why leave your visitors hanging, especially if an optimal customer experience is the goal? Were I to caption the corned beef, it’d be something along the lines of “Corned beef hash with minced meat and diced potatoes is one of the most popular dishes at XX.” It says just enough without trying to say everything, which is the goal, says Lurie.

“’Fully descriptive’ means ‘describes the thing to which it’s attached,’ not ‘describe the entire universe,'” he adds.

Also, invite customers to take and share pictures online (e.g., websites, Instagram, Yelp, Google) and include as much rich detail as possible.

What’s more, it might behoove you to have a Google Business View photo shoot, says Rozek. “Those show up most prominently (in the Knowledge Panel) for brand-name mobile searches in Google.”

#2 — Make reviews a priority

Many prospects and customers use reviews as a make-or-break tactic when making purchases. Brands, realizing this, have taken note, making it their charge to get positive reviews.

But not all reviews are created equal.

Instead of making certain your brand gets positive reviews on the entirety of its products and services, redouble your efforts at getting positive reviews on your bread-and-butter services.

In many instances, what people have to say about your individual services and/or products matters more than your brand’s overall review ratings.

I learned this from talking to several uber-picky foodie friends who shared that the main thing they look for is a brand having an overall rating (e.g., on Yelp, Google, Angie’s List, Amazon, etc.) higher than 3.5, but who have customer comments glorifying the specific product they’re hoping to enjoy.

“These days, everyone is gaming the system, doing what they can to get their customers to leave favorable reviews,” said one friend, who lives in Dallas. “But discerning [prospects] are only looking at the overall rating as a beginning point. From there, they’re digging into the comments, looking to see what people have to say about the very specific thing they want. [Smart brands] would focus more on getting people to leave comments about the particular service they used, how happy they work with the result and how it compares to other [such services they’ve used]. We may be on our phones, but we’re still willing to dig into those comments.”

To take advantage of this behavior,

  • In addition to asking for a favorable review, ask customers to comment on the specific services they used, providing as much detail as possible
  • Redouble your efforts at over-delivering on quality service when it comes to your core offerings
  • Ask a few of your regulars, who have left comments on review sites, what they think meets the minimum expectation for provoking folks to leave a review (e.g., optimizing for the desired behavior)
  • Encourage reviewers to upload photos with their reviews (or even just photos, if they don’t want to review you). They’re great “local content,” they’re useful as social-proof elements, and your customers may take better pictures than you do, in which case you can showcase them on your site.

Relevant content:

#3 — Shorten your content

I serve as a horrible spokesperson for content brevity, but it matters a great deal to mobile searchers. What works fine on desktop is a clutter-fest on mobile, even for sites using responsive design.

As a general rule, simplicity wins.

For example, Whataburger’s mobile experience is uncluttered, appealing to the eye and makes it clear what they want me to do: learn about their specials or make a purchase:

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On the other hand, McDonald’s isn’t so sure what I’m looking for, apparently:

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Are they trying to sell me potatoes, convince me of how committed they are to freshness or looking to learn as much as they can about me? Or all of the above?

Web searchers have specific needs and are typically short on time and patience, so you have to get in front of them with the right message to have a chance.

When it comes to the content you deliver, think tight (shorter), punchy (attention-grabbing) and valuable (on- message for the query).

# 4 — Optimize for local content

Like all of you, I’ve been using “near me” searches for years, especially when I travel. But over the last year, these searches have gotten more thorough and more accurate, in large part as a result of Google’s Mobile Update and because the search giant is making customer intent a priority.

In 2015, Google reported that “near me” searches increased by 34-fold since 2011.

And though most of these “near me” searches are for durable goods/appliances and their associated retailers, services, including “surgeons near me,” “plumbers near me,” “jobs near me,” etc., and other things that are typically in a high consideration set are growing considerably, according to Google via its website, thinkwithgoogle.com.

A recent case study of 82 websites (41, control group; 41, test group) shows just how dramatic the impact of optimizing a site for local intent can be. By tweaking the hours and directions page titles, descriptions and H1s to utilize the phrases “franchise dealer near me” and “nearest franchise dealer” the brand saw mobile impressions for “near me” more than double to 8,833 impressions and 46 clicks. (The control group’s “near me” impression share only rose 11%.)

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Image courtesy of CDK Global

Additional steps for optimizing your site for “near me” searches

  • Prominently display your business name, address and phone number (aka, NAP) on your site
  • Use schema markup in your NAP
  • In addition to proper setup and optimization of your Google My Business listing, provide each location with its own listing and, just as important, ensure that the business name, address and phone number of each location matches what’s listed on the site
  • Consider embedding a Google Map prominently on your website. “It’s good for user experience,” says Rozek. “But it may also influence rankings.”

#5 — Use Google App Deep Linking

We’ve all heard the statistics: The vast majority — in some circles the figure is 95% — of apps downloaded to mobile devices are never used. Don’t be deceived, however, into believing apps are irrelevant.

Nearly half of all time spent on the web is in apps.

This means that the mobile searchers looking for products or services in your area are likely using an app or, at the very least, prompted to enter/use an app.

For example, when I type “thai restaurant near me,” the first organic result is TripAdvisor.

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Upon entering the site, the first (and preferred) action the brand would like for me to make is to download the TripAdvisor app:

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Many times, a “near me” search will take us to content within an app, and we won’t even realize it until we see the “continue in XX app or visit the mobile site” banner.

And if a searcher doesn’t have the app installed, “Google can show an app install button. So, enabling your app for Google indexing could actually increase the installed base of the app,” writes Eric Enge of Stone Temple Consulting.

For brands, App Deep Linking (ADL), which he defines as “the ability for Google to index content from within an app and then display it as mobile search results,” has huge implications if utilized properly.

“Think about it,” he writes. “If your app is not one of the fortunate few that get most of the attention, but your app content ranks high in searches, then you could end up with a lot more users in your app than you might have had otherwise.”

(To access details on how to set up Google App Deep Linking, read Enge’s Search Engine Land article: SMX Advanced recap: Advanced Google App Deep Linking)

If your brand has an app, this is information you shouldn’t sleep on.

Typically, when I conduct a “near me” search, I click on/look through the images until I find one that fits what I’m looking for. Nine times out of ten (depending upon what I’m looking for), I’m either taken to content within an app or taken to a mobile site and prompted to download the app.

Seems to me that ADL would be a no-brainer.

Optimizing for mobile is simply putting web searchers first

For all the gnashing of teeth Google’s many actions/inactions provoke, the search giant deserves credit for making the needs of web searchers a priority.

Too often, we, as marketers, think first and foremost in this fashion:

  1. What do we have to sell?
  2. Who needs it?
  3. What’s the cheapest, easiest way to deliver the product or service?

I think Google is saying to us that the reverse needs to occur:

  1. Make it as fast and as easy for people to find what they want
  2. Better understand who it is that’s likely to be looking for it by better understanding our customers and their intent
  3. The sales process must begin by thinking “what specific needs do web searchers have that my brand is uniquely qualified to fulfill?”

In this way, we’re placing the needs of web searchers ahead of the needs of the brand, which will be the winning combination for successful companies in the days ahead.

Brands will either follow suit or fall by the wayside.

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Reblogged 1 year ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Darryl, the man behind dotmailer’s Custom Technical Solutions team

Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

I first got to know dotmailer when the company was just a bunch of young enthusiastic web developers called Ellipsis Media back in 1999. I was introduced by one of my suppliers and we decided to bring them on board to build a recruitment website for one of our clients. That client was Amnesty International and the job role was Secretary General. Not bad for a Croydon company whose biggest client before that was Scobles the plumber’s merchants. So, I was probably dotmailer’s first ever corporate client! After that, I used dotmailer at each company I worked for and then one day they approached a colleague and me and asked us if we wanted to work for them. That was 2013.  We grabbed the opportunity with both hands and haven’t looked back since.

Tell us a bit about your role

I’m the Global Head of Technical Solutions which actually gives me responsibility for 2 teams. First, Custom Technical Solutions (CTS), who build bespoke applications and tools for customers that allow them to integrate more closely with dotmailer and make life easier. Second, Technical Pre-sales, which spans our 3 territories (EMEA, US and APAC) and works with prospective and existing clients to figure out the best solution and fit within dotmailer.

What accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I would say so far it has to be helping to turn the CTS team from just 2 people into a group of 7 highly skilled and dedicated men and women who have become an intrinsic and valued part of the dotmailer organization. Also I really enjoy being part of the Senior Technical Management team. Here we have the ability to influence the direction and structure of the platform on a daily basis.

Meet Darryl Clark – the cheese and peanut butter sandwich lover

Can you speak a bit about your background and that of your team? What experience and expertise is required to join this team?

My background is quite diverse from a stint in the Army, through design college, web development, business analysis to heading up my current teams. I would say the most valuable skill that I have is being highly analytical. I love nothing more than listening to a client’s requirements and digging deep to work out how we can answer these if not exceed them.

As a team, we love nothing more than brainstorming our ideas. Every member has a valid input and we listen. Everyone has the opportunity to influence what we do and our motto is “there is no such thing as a stupid question.”

To work in my teams you have to be analytical but open minded to the fact that other people may have a better answer than you. Embrace other people’s input and use it to give our clients the best possible solution. We are hugely detail conscious, but have to be acutely aware that we need to tailor what we say to our audience so being able to talk to anyone at any level is hugely valuable.

How much of the dotmailer platform is easily customizable and when does it cross over into something that requires your team’s expertise? How much time is spent on these custom solutions one-time or ongoing?

I’ll let you in on a little secret here. We don’t actually do anything that our customers can’t do with dotmailer given the right knowledge and resources. This is because we build all of our solutions using the dotmailer public API. The API has hundreds of methods in both SOAP and REST versions, which allows you to do a huge amount with the dotmailer platform. We do have a vast amount of experience and knowledge in the team so we may well be able to build a solution quicker than our customers. We are more than happy to help them and their development teams build a solution using us on a consultancy basis to lessen the steepness of the learning curve.

Our aim when building a solution for a customer is that it runs silently in the background and does what it should without any fuss.

What are your plans for the Custom Tech Solutions team going forward?

The great thing about Custom Technical Solutions is you never know what is around the corner as our customers have very diverse needs. What we are concentrating on at the moment is refining our processes to ensure that they are as streamlined as possible and allow us to give as much information to the customer as we can. We are also always looking at the technology and coding approaches that we use to make sure that we build the most innovative and robust solutions.

We are also looking at our external marketing and sharing our knowledge through blogs so keep an eye on the website for our insights.

What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

Most questions seem to revolve around reassurance such as “Have you done this before?”, “How safe is my data?”, “What about security?”, “Can you talk to my developers?”, “Do I need to do anything?”.  In most instances, we are the ones asking the questions as we need to find out information as soon as possible so that we can analyse it to ensure that we have the right detail to provide the right solution.

Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

We talk a lot about working with best of breed so for example a customer can use our Channel Extensions in automation programs to fire out an SMS to a contact using their existing provider. We don’t force customers down one route, we like to let them decide for themselves.

Also, I really like to emphasize the fact that there is always more than one way to do something within the dotmailer platform. This means we can usually find a way to do something that works for a client within the platform. If not, then we call in CTS to work out if there is a way that we can build something that will — whether this is automating uploads for a small client or mass sending from thousands of child accounts for an enterprise level one.

What do you see as the future of marketing automation technology?  Will one size ever fit all? Or more customization going forward?

The 64 million dollar question. One size will never fit all. Companies and their systems are too organic for that. There isn’t one car that suits every driver or one racquet that suits every sport. Working with a top drawer partner network and building our system to be as open as possible from an integration perspective means that our customers can make dotmailer mold to their business and not the other way round…and adding to that the fact that we are building lots of features in the platform that will blow your socks off.

Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m a dyed in the wool Gooner (aka Arsenal Football Club fan) thanks to my Grandfather leading me down the right path as a child. If you are still reading this after that bombshell, then food-wise I pretty much like everything apart from coriander which as far as I’m concerned is the Devils own spawn. I don’t really have a favorite band, but am partial to a bit of Level 42 and Kings of Leon and you will also find me listening to 90s drum and bass and proper old school hip hop. My favorite holiday destination is any decent villa that I can relax in and spend time with my family and I went to Paris recently and loved that. Guilty pleasure – well that probably has to be confessing to liking Coldplay or the fact that my favorite sandwich is peanut butter, cheese and salad cream. Go on try it, you’ll love it.

Want to meet more of the dotmailer team? Say hi to Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support, and Dan Morris, EVP for North America.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Meet Dan Morris, Executive Vice President, North America

  1. Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

The top three reasons were People, Product and Opportunity. I met the people who make up our business and heard their stories from the past 18 years, learned about the platform and market leading status they had built in the UK, and saw that I could add value with my U.S. high growth business experience. I’ve been working with marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners for years across a series of different roles, and saw that I could apply what I’d learned from that and the start-up space to dotmailer’s U.S. operation. dotmailer has had clients in the U.S. for 12 years and we’re positioned to grow the user base of our powerful and easy-to-use platform significantly. I knew I could make a difference here, and what closed the deal for me was the people.  Every single person I’ve met is deeply committed to the business, to the success of our customers and to making our solution simple and efficient.  We’re a great group of passionate people and I’m proud to have joined the dotfamily.

Dan Morris, dotmailer’s EVP for North America in the new NYC office

      1. Tell us a bit about your new role

dotmailer has been in business and in this space for more than 18 years. We were a web agency, then a Systems Integrator, and we got into the email business that way, ultimately building the dotmailer platform thousands of people use daily. This means we know this space better than anyone and we have the perfect solutions to align closely with our customers and the solutions flexible enough to grow with them.  My role is to take all that experience and the platform and grow our U.S. presence. My early focus has been on identifying the right team to execute our growth plans. We want to be the market leader in the U.S. in the next three years – just like we’ve done in the UK –  so getting the right people in the right spots was critical.  We quickly assessed the skills of the U.S. team and made changes that were necessary in order to provide the right focus on customer success. Next, we set out to completely rebuild dotmailer’s commercial approach in the U.S.  We simplified our offers to three bundles, so that pricing and what’s included in those bundles is transparent to our customers.  We’ve heard great things about this already from clients and partners. We’re also increasing our resources on customer success and support.  We’re intensely focused on ease of on-boarding, ease of use and speed of use.  We consistently hear how easy and smooth a process it is to use dotmailer’s tools.  That’s key for us – when you buy a dotmailer solution, we want to onboard you quickly and make sure you have all of your questions answered right away so that you can move right into using it.  Customers are raving about this, so we know it’s working well.

  1. What early accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I’ve been at dotmailer for eight months now and I’m really proud of all we’ve accomplished together.  We spent a lot of time assessing where we needed to restructure and where we needed to invest.  We made the changes we needed, invested in our partner program, localized tech support, customer on-boarding and added customer success team members.  We have the right people in the right roles and it’s making a difference.  We have a commercial approach that is clear with the complete transparency that we wanted to provide our customers.  We’ve got a more customer-focused approach and we’re on-boarding customers quickly so they’re up and running faster.  We have happier customers than ever before and that’s the key to everything we do.

  1. You’ve moved the U.S. team to a new office. Can you tell us why and a bit about the new space?

I thought it was very important to create a NY office space that was tied to branding and other offices around the world, and also had its own NY energy and culture for our team here – to foster collaboration and to have some fun.  It was also important for us that we had a flexible space where we could welcome customers, partners and resellers, and also hold classes and dotUniversity training sessions. I’m really grateful to the team who worked on the space because it really reflects our team and what we care about.   At any given time, you’ll see a training session happening, the team collaborating, a customer dropping in to ask a few questions or a partner dropping in to work from here.  We love our new, NYC space.

We had a spectacular reception this week to celebrate the opening of this office with customers, partners and the dotmailer leadership team in attendance. Please take a look at the photos from our event on Facebook.

Guests and the team at dotmailer's new NYC office warming party

Guests and the team at dotmailer’s new NYC office warming party

  1. What did you learn from your days in the start-up space that you’re applying at dotmailer?

The start-up space is a great place to learn. You have to know where every dollar is going and coming from, so every choice you make needs to be backed up with a business case for that investment.  You try lots of different things to see if they’ll work and you’re ready to turn those tactics up or down quickly based on an assessment of the results. You also learn things don’t have to stay the way they are, and can change if you make them change. You always listen and learn – to customers, partners, industry veterans, advisors, etc. to better understand what’s working and not working.  dotmailer has been in business for 18 years now, and so there are so many great contributors across the business who know how things have worked and yet are always keen to keep improving.  I am constantly in listening and learning mode so that I can understand all of the unique perspectives our team brings and what we need to act on.

  1. What are your plans for the U.S. and the sales function there?

On our path to being the market leader in the U.S., I’m focused on three things going forward: 1 – I want our customers to be truly happy.  It’s already a big focus in the dotmailer organization – and we’re working hard to understand their challenges and goals so we can take product and service to the next level. 2 – Creating an even more robust program around partners, resellers and further building out our channel partners to continuously improve sales and customer service programs. We recently launched a certification program to ensure partners have all the training and resources they need to support our mutual customers.  3 – We have an aggressive growth plan for the U.S. and I’m very focused on making sure our team is well trained, and that we remain thoughtful and measured as we take the steps to grow.  We want to always keep an eye on what we’re known for – tools that are powerful and simple to use – and make sure everything else we offer remains accessible and valuable as we execute our growth plans.

  1. What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

The questions we usually get are around price, service level and flexibility.  How much does dotmailer cost?  How well are you going to look after my business?  How will you integrate into my existing stack and then my plans for future growth? We now have three transparent bundle options with specifics around what’s included published right on our website.  We have introduced a customer success team that’s focused only on taking great care of our customers and we’re hearing stories every day that tells me this is working.  And we have all of the tools to support our customers as they grow and to also integrate into their existing stacks – often integrating so well that you can use dotmailer from within Magento, Salesforce or Dynamics, for example.

  1. Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

In addition to the ones above – ease of use, speed of use and the ability to scale with you. With dotmailer’s tiered program, you can start with a lighter level of functionality and grow into more advanced functionality as you need it. The platform itself is so easy to use that most marketers are able to build campaigns in minutes that would have taken hours on other platforms. Our customer success team is also with you all the way if ever you want or need help.  We’ve built a very powerful platform and we have a fantastic team to help you with personalized service as an extended part of your team and we’re ready to grow with you.

  1. How much time is your team on the road vs. in the office? Any road warrior tips to share?

I’ve spent a lot of time on the road, one year I attended 22 tradeshows! Top tip when flying is to be willing to give up your seat for families or groups once you’re at the airport gate, as you’ll often be rewarded with a better seat for helping the airline make the family or group happy. Win win! Since joining dotmailer, I’m focused on being in office and present for the team and customers as much as possible. I can usually be found in our new, NYC office where I spend a lot of time with our team, in customer meetings, in trainings and other hosted events, sales conversations or marketing meetings. I’m here to help the team, clients and partners to succeed, and will always do my best to say yes! Once our prospective customers see how quickly and efficiently they can execute tasks with dotmailer solutions vs. their existing solutions, it’s a no-brainer for them.  I love seeing and hearing their reactions.

  1. Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m originally from Yorkshire in England, and grew up just outside York. I moved to the U.S. about seven years ago to join a very fast growing startup, we took it from 5 to well over 300 people which was a fantastic experience. I moved to NYC almost two years ago, and I love exploring this great city.  There’s so much to see and do.  Outside of dotmailer, my passion is cars, and I also enjoy skeet shooting, almost all types of music, and I love to travel – my goal is to get to India, Thailand, Australia and Japan in the near future.

Want to find out more about the dotfamily? Check out our recent post about Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com