From manual to automatic: how automation saved Minor Entertainment 50 hours’ admin time

When I ask clients why they’re not yet using marketing automation, the top reasons are either data gaps or a lack of available time/budget.

Minor Entertainment Ltd was one of those organizations who hadn’t yet realized the potential of marketing automation. The company specializes in spectacular family theater events, with its most famous being In the Night Garden Live which typically tours UK cities from May to August.

Before introducing marketing automation to its communications strategy, Minor Entertainment Ltd used to collect ticket information via a third-party data warehouse which offered a limited integration with dotmailer. The lack of integration meant that its marketing team were forced to manually send emails to ticket holders to let them know about the event, location and merchandising available, which was becoming extremely time consuming.

After an initial data assessment, we identified a way to improve the current custom integration so it’d provide the data we needed to build our marketing automation. We named the program the ‘Get Ready automation’ because the communications it delivers are aimed at prepping ticketholders about their upcoming show. Using dotmailer and the newly enabled flow of data, the program automatically triggers a series of personalized emails providing people with the right information at the right times.

What were the results?

The Get Ready program has resulted in huge efficiencies, reducing human error to zero. We’ve estimated that the company is now saving around 50 hours of admin time a year; not only a significant cost saving but it’s enabling the marketing team to focus on more fun and productive activities.

Jenni McNally, who’s the Marketing Manager at Minor Entertainment Ltd, commented on the results of the work: “We are delighted with our new automation program. It has saved us an enormous amount of admin time.”

How can I get marketing automation off the ground?

If you’re an extremely busy team, making time to save time is often the hardest part. Here are a few things to consider to help you on your journey to smarter marketing:

  1. Find the right tool: the program builder is available in every dotmailer account and it’s easy to use. Here’s a link to our automation videos to show you how to get started.
  2. Plan: if you’re super busy, draw up a priority list of automations and build them into long-term plan. Having a roadmap will help you to keep on track and avoid getting overwhelmed. As they say, a goal without a plan is just a wish!
  3. Improve: start simple and build up as you go. Build, measure, learn and repeat.

Here’s a list of automations to get your started:

  1. Welcome series: introduce new subscribers to your brand, with a series of emails that move prospects closer towards a purchase.
  2. Transactional programs: spice up functional transactional emails, like order confirmations, so they’re inspiring and better promote your brand.
  3. Post-purchase programs: build trust in your brand and help new customers get the most out of their product with helpful, relevant content.
  4. Abandoned cart program: rescue lost sales by reminding customers who’ve left items in their cart to come back and complete the purchase.
  5. Abandoned browse programs: use web behavioural tracking with automation to send follow-up emails with content based on what users have browsed.
  6. Product replenishment programs: remind customers to re-stock with automated emails when you have a good idea that their supplies are dwindling.
  7. Customer retention programs: from loyalty programs to brand-building content, you can automate emails that keep your brand front of mind.
  8. Recommendation and upsell programs: use customers’ past purchase and web browsing behaviour to automate product recommendation and upsell emails.
  9. Lost customer programs: reduce your attrition rate by using automated programs to send incentives to buy again or capture why they left.
  10. Date-driven programs: use the valuable data you have to get in touch during different times of the year, such as ‘happy birthday’ emails.

Get your free copy of our ‘Making time to save time’ guide which’ll put you on the path to marketing automation:

Should you need any help to create your automation roadmap or in getting your programs set up, please don’t hesitate to reach out to your Account Manager. We offer Automation Kickstarters, custom integrations and collaborative implementation workshops.

The post From manual to automatic: how automation saved Minor Entertainment 50 hours’ admin time appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 week ago from blog.dotmailer.com

5 Tips to Help Show ROI from Local SEO

Posted by JoyHawkins

Earlier this year, when I was first writing my advanced local SEO training, I reached out to some users who work for local SEO agencies and asked them what they’d like more training on. The biggest topic I got as a result was related to tracking and reporting value to small business owners.

My clients will often forward me reports from their prior SEO company, expressing that they have no idea what they were getting for their money. Some of the most common complaints I see with these reports are:

  • Too much use of marketing lingo (“Bounce Rate,” “CTR,” etc.)
  • Way too much data
  • No representation of what impact the work done had on the business itself (did it get them more customers?)

If a small business owner is giving you hundreds or thousands of dollars every month, how do you prove to them they’re getting value from it? There’s a lot to dig into with this topic — I included a full six pages on it in my training. Today I wanted to share some of the most successful tips that I use with my own clients.


1. Stop sending automated Google Analytics reports

If the goal is to show the customer what they’re getting from their investment, you probably won’t achieve it by simply sending them an Analytics report each month. Google Analytics is a powerful tool, but it only looks awesome to you because you’re a marketer. Over the past year, I’ve looked at many monthly reports that made my head spin — it’s just too much data. The average SMB isn’t going to be able to look at those reports and figure out how their bounce rate decreasing somehow means you’re doing a great job at SEO.

2. Make conversions the focus of your report

What does the business owner care about? Hint: it’s not how you increased the ranking for one of their 50 tracked keywords this month. No, what they care about is how much additional business you drove to their business. This should be the focus of the report you send them.

3. Use dynamic number insertion to track calls

If you’re not already doing this, you’re really killing your ability to show value. I don’t have a single SEO or SEM client that isn’t using call tracking. I use Call Tracking Metrics, but CallRail is another one that works well, too. This allows you to see the sources of incoming calls. Unlike slapping a call tracking number on your website, dynamic number insertion won’t mess up NAP consistency.

The bonus here is that you can set up these calls as goals in Google Analytics. Using the Landing Page report, you can see which pages on the site were responsible for getting that call. Instead of saying, “Hey customer, a few months ago I created this awesome page of content for you,” you can say “Hey customer, a few months ago, I added this page to your site and as a result, it’s got you 5 more calls.”
Conversion goal completion in Google Analytics

4. Estimate revenue

I remember sitting in a session a couple years ago when Dev Basu from Powered by Search told me about this tactic. I had a lightbulb moment, wondering why the heck I didn’t think to do this before.

The concept is simple: Ask the client what the average lifetime value of their customer is. Next, ask them what their average closing ratio is on Internet leads. Take those numbers and, based on the number of conversions, you can calculate their estimated revenue.

Formula: Lifetime Value of a Customer x Closing Ratio (%) x Number of Conversions = Estimated Revenue

Bonus tip: Take this a step further and show them that for every dollar they pay you, you make them $X. Obviously, if the lifetime value of the customer is high, these numbers look a lot better. For example, an attorney could look like this:Example monthly ROI for an attorneyWhereas an insurance agent would look like this:
Example monthly ROI for an insurance agent

5. Show before/after screenshots, not a ranking tracker.

I seriously love ranking trackers. I spend a ton of time every week looking at reports in Bright Local for my clients. However, I really believe ranking trackers are best used for marketers, not business owners. How many times have you had a client call you freaking out because they noticed a drop in ranking for one keyword? I chose to help stop this trend by not including ranking reports in my monthly reporting and have never regretted that decision.

Instead, if I want to highlight a significant ranking increase that happened as a result of SEO, I can do that by showing the business owner a visual — something they will actually understand. This is where I use Bright Local’s screenshots; I can see historically how a SERP used to look versus how it looks now.


At the end of the day, to show ROI you need to think like a business owner, not a marketer. If your goals match the goals of the business owner (which is usually to increase calls), make sure that’s what you’re conveying in your monthly reporting.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 2 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

What You Need to Know About Duplicate GMB Listings [Excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO]

Posted by JoyHawkins

Recently, I’ve had a lot of people ask me how to deal with duplicate listings in Google My Business now that MapMaker is dead. Having written detailed instructions outlining different scenarios for the advanced local SEO training manual I started selling over at LocalU, I thought it’d be great to give Moz readers a sample of 5 pages from the manual outlining some best practices.


What you need to know about duplicate GMB listings

Before you start, you need to find out if the listing is verified. If the listing has an “own this business” or “claim this business” option, it is not currently verified. If missing that label, it means it is verified — there is nothing you can do until you get ownership or have it unverified (if you’re the one who owns it in GMB). This should be your first step before you proceed with anything below.

Storefronts

  • Do the addresses on the two listings match? If the unverified duplicate has the same address as the verified listing, you should contact Google My Business support and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the addresses do not match, find out if the business used to be at that address at some point in time.
    • If the business has never existed there:
      • Pull up the listing on Maps
      • Press “Suggest an edit”
      • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
      • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

  • If the duplicate lists an address that is an old address (they were there at some point but have moved), you will want to have the duplicate marked as moved.

Service area businesses

  • Is the duplicate listing verified? If it is, you will first have to get it unverified or gain access to it. Once you’ve done that, contact Google My Business and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the duplicate is not verified, you can have it removed from Maps since service area businesses are not permitted on Google Maps. Google My Business allows them, but any unverified listing would follow Google Maps rules, not Google My Business. To remove it:
    • Pull up the listing on Maps
    • Press “Suggest an edit”
    • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
    • Select “Private” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

Practitioner listings

Public-facing professionals (doctors, lawyers, dentists, realtors, etc.) are allowed their own listings separate from the office they work for, unless they’re the only public-facing professional at that office. In that case, they are considered a solo practitioner and there should only be one listing, formatted as “Business Name: Professional Name.”

Solo practitioner with two listings

This is probably one of the easiest scenarios to fix because solo practitioners are only supposed to have one listing. If you have a scenario where there’s a listing for both the practice and the practitioner, you can ask Google My Business to merge the two and it will combine the ranking strength of both. It will also give you one listing with more reviews (if each individual listing had reviews on it). The only scenario where I don’t advise combining the two is if your two listings both rank together and are monopolizing two of the three spots in the 3-pack. This is extremely rare.

Multi-practitioner listings

If the business has multiple practitioners, you are not able to get these listings removed or merged provided the practitioner still works there. While I don’t generally suggest creating listings for practitioners, they often exist already, leaving people to wonder what to do with them to keep them from competing with the listing for the practice.

A good strategy is to work on having multiple listings rank if you have practitioners that specialize in different things. Let’s say you have a chiropractor who also has a massage therapist at his office. The massage therapist’s listing could link to a page on the site that ranks highly for “massage therapy” and the chiropractor could link to the page that ranks highest organically for chiropractic terms. This is a great way to make the pages more visible instead of competing.

Another example would be a law firm. You could have the main listing for the law firm optimized for things like “law firm,” then have one lawyer who specializes in personal injury law and another lawyer who specializes in criminal law. This would allow you to take advantage of the organic ranking for several different keywords.

Keep in mind that if your goal is to have three of your listings all rank for the exact same keyword on Google, thus monopolizing the entire 3-pack, this is an unrealistic strategy. Google has filters that keep the same website from appearing too many times in the results and unless you’re in a really niche industry or market, it’s almost impossible to accomplish this.

Practitioners who no longer work there

It’s common to find listings for practitioners who no longer work for your business but did at some point. If you run across a listing for a former practitioner, you’ll want to contact Google My Business and ask them to mark the listing as moved to your practice listing. It’s extremely important that you get them to move it to your office listing, not the business the practitioner now works for (if they have been employed elsewhere). Here is a good case study that shows you why.

If the practitioner listing is verified, things can get tricky since Google My Business won’t be able to move it until it’s unverified. If the listing is verified by the practitioner and they refuse to give you access or remove it, the second-best thing would be to get them to update the listing to have their current employer’s information on it. This isn’t ideal and should be a last resort.

Listings for employees (not public-facing)

If you find a listing for a non-public-facing employee, it shouldn’t exist on Maps. For example: an office manager of a law firm, a paralegal, a hygienist, or a nurse. You can get the listing removed:

  • Pull up the listing on Maps
  • Press “Suggest an edit”
  • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed..” to Yes
  • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit.

Listings for deceased practitioners

This is always a terrible scenario to have to deal with, but I’ve run into lots of cases where people don’t know how to get rid of listings for deceased practitioners. The solution is similar to what you would do for someone who has left the practice, except you want to add an additional step. Since the listings are often verified and people usually don’t have access to the deceased person’s Google account, you want to make sure you tell Google My Business support that the person is deceased and include a link to their obituary online so the support worker can confirm you’re telling the truth. I strongly recommend using either Facebook or Twitter to do this, since you can easily include the link (it’s much harder to do on a phone call).

Creating practitioner listings

If you’re creating a practitioner listing from scratch, you might run into issues if you’re trying to do it from the Google My Business dashboard and you already have a verified listing for the practice. The error you would get is shown below.

There are two ways around this:

  1. Create the listing via Google Maps. Do this by searching the address and then clicking “Add a missing place.” Do not include the firm/practice name in the title of the listing or your edit most likely won’t go through, since it will be too similar to the listing that already exists for the practice. Once you get an email from Google Maps stating the listing has been successfully added, you will be able to claim it via GMB.
  2. Contact GMB support and ask them for help.

We hope you enjoyed this excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO! The full 160+-page guide is available for purchase and download via LocalU below.

Get the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 5 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

How to benefit from Amazon’s values

In the last decade, retail has evolved at a tremendous pace – ecommerce broke down physical borders, orders are delivered at speeds that narrow the virtual to reality gap, and intuitive communications take second-guessing out of shopping. The enabler of these progressions is technology, and arguably, no retailer has embraced it with as much success as Amazon. While many retailers bemoan the sales that Amazon have ‘stolen’ under their feet, shouldn’t we look at this as an opportunity to grow?

Let’s talk about what retailers may love or hate about Amazon. For one, it has shown that getting shipping and fulfillment just right is rewarding, and that investing in the process helps you achieve economies of scale. Amazon’s laser focus on customers is nothing short of ground-breaking; it recently scored a hat-trick for winning at customer service. Ironically, the things that Amazon does so well are what retailers in general strive for – the point of difference perhaps, is the distance that it’s willing to go. Here’s five of Amazon’s values that reflect the way they do business:

“Customer obsession”

They certainly walk the talk at Amazon when it comes to serving their customers; more than tripling its marketing spend since 2012 to US$7.23 billion in 2016. In ‘The Delivery Advantage’ e-book, we featured Amazon’s successful Harry Potter launches, where its commitment to pre-launch deliveries delighted the series’ legion of fans.

“Invent and simplify”

A question that’s been raised a number of times is whether Amazon is focused on retail or logistics – due to the company’s reinvention of the supply chain process. Its investment into fulfillment centres, trucks and trailers, Amazon Flex delivery partners, and acquisition of French parcel service Colis Privé, seems to suggest the latter.

“Learn and be curious”

Technology has made learning so much easier; and Amazon is spearheading this with machine learning. What makes Amazon stand out is its approach to failure as part of the learning process. Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos once said, “Failure comes part and parcel with invention. It’s not optional.”

“Frugality”

Although failure costs Amazon “billions of dollars”, at its core, it’s frugal. It believes that it’s unnecessary to overspend on things that don’t directly benefit customers – so that means economy flights for all, including senior executives. You could argue that Amazon Prime was built on the idea of frugality, members feel like they’re saving money with premium free shipping.

“Deliver results”

It’s no coincidence that Amazon has placed this value at the end of its list. Without the ability to deliver results, the company won’t be able to execute any of the above – rather, they would remain only as ideas. And what results they are: Amazon is the 3rd most valuable brand in the world, just behind Google and Apple, with its brand monetary value rising by 54% to $106.4 million last year.

As a shipping technology partner for over 60,000 merchants and retailers, our team at Temando is aware that Amazon has really thrown down the gauntlet on what shoppers expect from their shopping experiences – be it with products or service. Here, we suggest practical shipping tactics based on the five Amazon principles above to show merchants that these values can be applied to anything you do:

  1. Customer obsession: Nothing dampens online shopping more than concluding with a poor shipping experience. Why not bring customers along the journey by offering relevant shipping options at checkout, complete with dynamic pricing (so there’s no nasty surprises), providing the option to easily track deliveries and making a self-service returns portal available?
  2. Invent and simplify: Shipping and fulfillment can be a manual, time-consuming task – but does it really need to be? You’d be surprised at how you would be able to increase customer satisfaction when you’re effective at processing orders quicker. Shipping technologies such as ours can streamline how you pick, pack and dispatch orders, and which carriers match the customer’s chosen delivery option.
  3. Learn and be curious: Shipping is a competitive advantage, so use it to improve customer relationships. Be receptive to customer feedback, and study your data to keep your shipping options relevant. Keep your eyes open for new and popular types of shipping options, such as same-day or hyperlocal (1-3 hours), and make sure you’re set up to easily integrate relevant carriers as you grow.
  4. Frugality: Many merchants think of shipping as a loss leader due to the traditionally high cost associated to its execution. However, by implementing shipping technology to support carrier selection, you’re saving money in the long run and will consistently get orders out to your customers quicker – and for less.
  5. Deliver results: Last but not least, all the shipping improvements that you make must result in better performance for your company, such as uptick in sales and/or reputation. By accelerating the shipping and fulfillment process, not only will you create better shopping experiences for your online customers, you’ll save on operational costs without sacrificing the growth of your business.

So while Amazon is a valid threat for many retailers, the company has also pushed the concept of customer-centricity and efficiency to another level – setting a new standard of retailing.

Like dotmailer, we at Temando are dedicated to helping retailers perform at their best in this evolving environment. Just as email marketing is an effective tactic to increase conversion, shipping technology is a valuable tool for merchants looking to be optimally efficient.

Explore how shipping improvements can work for you by downloading The Delivery Advantage e-book, or connect with me on LinkedIn – I’d love to hear from you.

Note: This article is an extension on an article I wrote in Internet Retailing that’s published on 7th February 2017.

The post How to benefit from Amazon’s values appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 8 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

6 business types that reap the most reward from local SEO

Does your business serve a local market? Columnist Pratik Dholakiya shares tips for six business types that can really benefit from local search engine optimization.

The post 6 business types that reap the most reward from local SEO appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 8 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

3 tech takeaways from New York Fashion Week

More and more designers are turning to technology to help their brand stand out, a trend we can expect to continue into the future. From virtual reality to “coded couture”, here are five techie trends that the fashion industry is embracing.

Make your fashion dreams a (virtual) reality

It’s no secret that virtual reality has become one of tech’s biggest trends – now it’s fashion’s turn. Samsung unveiled some of its newest fashion technology at the National Retail Federation’s BIG show in January. Through Samsung’s virtual reality headsets, users would find themselves sitting front row at their favorite brand’s runway show – no ticket required. The app “Obsess” allows you to sit front row and even interact with the show, choosing your favorite looks and getting a link to the outfit via email for a quick and easy purchase. This virtual reality shopping spree just changed the game.

The store of the future

Rent the Runway (RTR) is making a big splash in the future of retail and tech. The once exclusively online brand just recently began opening brick-and-mortar retail locations and,  with the help of Samsung’s technology, are now leading the charge in “smart stores”. RTR’s smart store, found in NYC’s flatiron district, will guide your visit based on your past interactions with the brand across all platforms (online, in-app, in store). Digital screens line the walls and interactive mirrors give you tips while you find the perfect outfit. We’ve heard Neiman Marcus has been getting tutored in the art of smart as well. Keep a look out for some helpful mirrors.

You can have your data and wear it too

Touchscreen jackets, smart purses and coded couture…oh my! If Fashion Week has shown us anything, it’s that the future of fashion is digital. Olya Petrova Jackson’s line, Ab[Screenwear], is tech friendly, featuring fashionably fuzzy touch-screen gloves. Meanwhile, Rebecca Minkoff’s newest bags provide access codes to exclusive content, aiming to make everything a part of the #BornDigital wardrobe. In other news, Google and Ivyrevel will be stealing the (fashion) show with their new digital dresses, designed for you, by data collected from an app on your smartphone.

 

As Fashion Week in NYC continues to rage on, these are some of the techy trends that we can expect to continue throughout the season.

The post 3 tech takeaways from New York Fashion Week appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 8 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Simply the Best: 2016’s Top Content from the Moz Blog

Posted by FeliciaCrawford

Now that we’ve comfortably settled into the first two weeks of 2017, it’s time to revive an annual Moz Blog tradition: the Best of 2016 is here!

I’ve carefully collected data on all the posts, comments, and commenters you remarkable readers liked the most this past year, compiling it all into one big, beautiful blog post. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll rue the day you ever downloaded Pocket. But as we commence our journey into the insights and revelations of yesteryear, my sincere hope is that you’ll feel inspired. That you’ll learn something new, or reflect on what’s changed. That you’ll tack a new task onto your bucket list (“Become a Moz Top Commenter” is way more hip than traveling to all 7 continents, people).

Flip on some classic Tina Turner to set the mood and join me as we sift through what you decided was simply the best of 2016.

Table of Contents

  1. Top posts by 1Metric score
  2. Top posts by unique visits
  3. Top YouMoz posts by unique visits
  4. Top posts by number of thumbs up
  5. Top posts by number of comments
  6. Top community comments by thumbs up
  7. Top commenters by total thumbs up
  8. New: Category-specific RSS feeds!

1. The top 10 posts according to our 1Metric score

1Metric is our handy-dandy internal metric that measures how well a piece of content is doing. There were quite a few high scores in 2016, with a clear, strong trend toward core SEO topics. You might notice some posts making it onto a few different lists — consider those the absolute must-reads, and make sure you didn’t miss anything big!

1. 8 Old School SEO Practices That Are No Longer Effective – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, April 29th
Are you guilty of living in the past? Using methods that were once tried-and-true can be alluring, but it can also prove dangerous to your search strategy. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand spells out eight old school SEO practices that you should ditch in favor of more effective and modern alternatives.
2. My Single Best SEO Tip for Improved Web Traffic by Cyrus Shepard, January 27th
“If content is king, then the user is queen, and she rules the universe.” Are you focusing too much on the content, rather than the user? In his last post as a Mozzer, Cyrus Shepard offers his single greatest SEO tip for improving your web traffic.
3. On-Page SEO in 2016: The 8 Principles for Success – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, May 13th
On-page SEO is no longer a simple matter of checking things off a list. There’s more complexity to this process in 2016 than ever before, and the idea of “optimization” both includes and builds upon traditional page elements. In this Whiteboard Friday, Rand explores the eight principles you’ll need for on-page SEO success going forward.
1metric98.png
4. 301 Redirects Rules Change: What You Need to Know for SEO by Cyrus Shepard, August 1st
Google blew our minds when they said 3xx redirects no longer lose PageRank. Cyrus is here to give you the low-down on what this means for SEO.
1metric97.png
5. 10 Predictions for 2016 in SEO & Web Marketing by Rand Fishkin, January 5th
Rand examines the accuracy on his predictions for 2015 and, if he does well enough, taps into his psychic ability to predict 2016. Spoiler alert: He’s pretty accurate.
1metric97.png
6. 8 Rules for Choosing a Domain Name – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, July 15th
8 rules for choosing a domain name: Make it brandable, pronounceable, short, intuitive, bias to .com, avoid names that infringe on another company, use broad keywords, and if not available, modify.
1metric96.png
7. Can SEOs Stop Worrying About Keywords and Just Focus on Topics? – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, February 5th
Should you ditch keyword targeting entirely? There’s been a lot of discussion around the idea of focusing on broad topics and concepts to satisfy searcher intent, but it’s a big step to take and could potentially hurt your rankings. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand discusses old-school keyword targeting and new-school concept targeting, outlining a plan of action you can follow to get the best of both worlds.
1metric96.png
8. Weird, Crazy Myths About Link Building in SEO You Should Probably Ignore – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, September 9th
From where to how to when, there are a number of erroneous claims about link building floating around the SEO world. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand sets the record straight on 8 of the more common claims he’s noticed lately.
1metric96.png
9. How Long Does Link Building Take to Influence Rankings? by Kristina Kledzik, August 21st
The eternal question: How much time does it take for a link to affect rankings? Kristina Kledzik breaks out the entire process from start to finish.
1metric95.png
10. SEO for Bloggers: How to Nail the Optimization Process for Your Posts – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, June 3rd
With the right process and a dose of patience, SEO success is always within reach — even if you’re running your own blog. Optimizing your blog posts begins as early as the inception of your idea, and from then on you’ll want to consider your keyword targeting, on-page factors, your intended audience, and more. In this Whiteboard Friday, Rand spells out a step-by-step process you can adopt to help increase search traffic to your blog over time.
1metric94.png

2. The top 10 blog posts by unique visits

Rand and his Whiteboard Fridays steal the show this year, with some fantastic cameos by our good friends Cyrus and Dr. Pete, and a promoted YouMoz post that’s worth its backlinks in gold.

One interesting thing to note: You really loved last year’s “Predictions for SEO” post. While 2016 was unpredictable on multiple levels, Rand still made the cut — be sure to check out his predictions for 2017, released just yesterday.

1. 8 Old School SEO Practices That Are No Longer Effective – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, April 29th
Are you guilty of living in the past? Using methods that were once tried-and-true can be alluring, but it can also prove dangerous to your search strategy. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand spells out eight old school SEO practices that you should ditch in favor of more effective and modern alternatives.
blogvisits1.png
2. 8 Rules for Choosing a Domain Name – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, July 15th
8 rules for choosing a domain name: Make it brandable, pronounceable, short, intuitive, bias to .com, avoid names that infringe on another company, use broad keywords, and if not available, modify.
blogvisits2.png
3. My Single Best SEO Tip for Improved Web Traffic by Cyrus Shepard, January 27th
“If content is king, then the user is queen, and she rules the universe.” Are you focusing too much on the content, rather than the user? In his last post as a Mozzer, Cyrus Shepard offers his single greatest SEO tip for improving your web traffic.
blogvisits3.png
4. On-Page SEO in 2016: The 8 Principles for Success – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, May 13th
On-page SEO is no longer a simple matter of checking things off a list. There’s more complexity to this process in 2016 than ever before, and the idea of “optimization” both includes and builds upon traditional page elements. In this Whiteboard Friday, Rand explores the eight principles you’ll need for on-page SEO success going forward.
blogvisits4.png
5. Title Tag Length Guidelines: 2016 Edition by Dr. Pete, May 31st
Google is testing a wider left-column, and with it, wider display titles. We dig into the data to see how long your titles should be. TL;DR? Stick to under 60 characters.
blogvisits5.png
6. 301 Redirects Rules Change: What You Need to Know for SEO by Cyrus Shepard, August 1st
Google blew our minds when they said 3xx redirects no longer lose PageRank. Cyrus is here to give you the low-down on what this means for SEO.
blogvisits6.png
7. 10 Predictions for 2016 in SEO & Web Marketing by Rand Fishkin, January 5th
Rand examines the accuracy on his predictions for 2015 and, if he does well enough, taps into his psychic ability to predict 2016. Spoiler alert: He’s pretty accurate.
blogvisits7.png
8. How to Achieve 100/100 with the Google Page Speed Test Tool by Felix Tarcomnicu, April 3rd
The website loading speed is imperative for the overall user experience, and it’s also one of the hundreds of SEO ranking factors. The truth is that nowadays, people don’t have the patience to wait more than five seconds for a page to load. If your website is not loading fast enough, you will lose potential customers.
blogvisits8.png
9. Targeted Link Building in 2016 – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, January 29th
SEO has much of its roots in the practice of targeted link building. And while it’s no longer the only core component involved, it’s still a hugely valuable factor when it comes to rank boosting. In this week’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand goes over why targeted link building is still relevant today and how to develop a process you can strategically follow to success.
blogvisits9.png
10. How to Create 10x Content – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, March 18th
Have you ever actually tried to create 10x content? It’s not easy, is it? Knowing how and where to start can often be the biggest obstacle you’ll face. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand talks about how good, unique content is going to die, and how you can develop your own 10x content to help it along.
blogvisits10.png

3. The top 10 YouMoz posts by unique visits

Late in 2016, we lost another old friend. And while YouMoz can’t claim to have sung the best song about an astronaut you’ll ever hear, we still loved it dearly while it was with us. Retiring our process for community contributions was a hard but ultimately necessary decision, and while we hope to have a newer, sleeker process in place someday, let’s take a moment to revisit the most popular posts from the final year of YouMoz.

1. How to Use Six Google Analytics Reports to Complete a Website Content Audit by Daniel Hochuli, February 18th
In this article, I will show you how a content audit with six important Google Analytics reports can help you make some smart decisions about the health of your current site, what your audience wants from your content, and how you can benchmark your performance for future content marketing efforts.
2. How to Find and Fix Structured Data Markup Errors via the Google Search Console by Al Gomez, April 7th
Make your content easier for the search bots to read by eliminating data markup errors from your website.
3. 5 Essential E-Commerce Rich Snippets for Your Store by Aleh Barysevich, February 2nd
When it comes to online marketing bang for your buck, rich snippets are hard to beat.
4. 5 YouTube Tools to Boost Your Content Marketing Efforts by Ann Smarty, March 3rd
YouTube marketing can be overwhelming. Ann Smarty shares her favorite video marketing tools that let you discover more opportunities and allow you to achieve better results.
5. Here’s How to Automate Google Analytics Reporting with Google Sheets by Gabriele Toninelli, February 25th
When it comes to automating your Google Analytics reporting, Google Sheets is your friend.
6. How to Perform an Image Optimization Audit by Ryan Ayres, January 20th
Have you made image optimization a priority for your website? If not, there’s no time like the present.
7. Here’s How My 5-Step YouTube Optimization Strategy Generated 5,121,327 Views by Amir Jaffari, January 28th
In this article, Amir Jaffari explains how following a 5-step process enabled him to increase his annotation CTR by 22,400% (from 0.2% to 45%), how he received 150,000 views from annotations, and how this resulted in millions of views.
8. Hacking Facebook’s Local Awareness Ads: 5 Advanced Tips by Garrett Mehrguth, January 26th
For years, local businesses relied solely on direct mail, stickers, flyers, referrals, and word of mouth. These were the life-blood of their business. Now, in the digital age, we can replace these tactics with a more affordable digital channel that has the power to bolster all of our other marketing channels.
9. 10 Simple Steps for Creating a Blog Your Readers Will Adore by Martina Mercer, March 21st
The keys to making your blog a success is knowing who’ll be reading it and what they desire in the way of content.
10. Here’s How to Visually Map a Content Strategy by Katy Katz, June 13th
When it comes to building a content strategy to guide your brand, seeing is believing, so creating a visual roadmap can help mightily.

4. The top 10 posts by number of thumbs up

If the heated debate in 2016 was whether technical SEO was necessary or important, the trends here suggest an answer: it is. While you’ll see some overlap with our top posts by 1Metric here, be sure you don’t miss Dave Sottimano’s challenging (yet rewarding) task list for Junior SEOs or Mike King’s masterpiece analysis of the technical SEO renaissance.

1. My Single Best SEO Tip for Improved Web Traffic by Cyrus Shepard, January 27th
“If content is king, then the user is queen, and she rules the universe.” Are you focusing too much on the content, rather than the user? In his last post as a Mozzer, Cyrus Shepard offers his single greatest SEO tip for improving your web traffic.
2. On-Page SEO in 2016: The 8 Principles for Success – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, May 13th
On-page SEO is no longer a simple matter of checking things off a list. There’s more complexity to this process in 2016 than ever before, and the idea of “optimization” both includes and builds upon traditional page elements. In this Whiteboard Friday, Rand explores the eight principles you’ll need for on-page SEO success going forward.
3. Can SEOs Stop Worrying About Keywords and Just Focus on Topics? – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, February 5th
Should you ditch keyword targeting entirely? There’s been a lot of discussion around the idea of focusing on broad topics and concepts to satisfy searcher intent, but it’s a big step to take and could potentially hurt your rankings. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand discusses old-school keyword targeting and new-school concept targeting, outlining a plan of action you can follow to get the best of both worlds.
4. 8 Old School SEO Practices That Are No Longer Effective – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, April 29th
Are you guilty of living in the past? Using methods that were once tried-and-true can be alluring, but it can also prove dangerous to your search strategy. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand spells out eight old school SEO practices that you should ditch in favor of more effective and modern alternatives.
5. Weird, Crazy Myths About Link Building in SEO You Should Probably Ignore – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, September 9th
From where to how to when, there are a number of erroneous claims about link building floating around the SEO world. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand sets the record straight on 8 of the more common claims he’s noticed lately.
6. Linking Internally and Externally from Your Site – Dangers, Opportunities, Risk and Reward – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, April 15th
Navigating linking practices can be a treacherous process. Sometimes it feels like a penalty is lurking around every corner. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand talks about the ins and outs of linking internally and externally, identifying pitfalls and opportunities both.
7. Targeted Link Building in 2016 – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, January 29th
SEO has much of its roots in the practice of targeted link building. And while it’s no longer the only core component involved, it’s still a hugely valuable factor when it comes to rank boosting. In this week’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand goes over why targeted link building is still relevant today and how to develop a process you can strategically follow to success.
8. An Essential Training Task List for Junior SEOs by David Sottimano, August 10th
With 5 detailed projects that drag you through the technical trenches, this customizable training program for Junior SEOs should put you on the road to skill mastery (and a nice career edge) in just a couple of months.
9. The Technical SEO Renaissance: The Whys and Hows of SEO’s Forgotten Role in the Mechanics of the Web by Michael King, October 25th
Technical SEO is more complicated and more important than ever before, while much of the SEO discussion has shied away from its growing technical components in favor of content marketing. Mike King makes a compelling case for exactly why and how a returned focus on technical SEO will rejuvenate and revolutionize the search game.
10. A Step-by-Step Process for Discovering and Prioritizing the Best Keywords – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, May 6th
Rand outlines a straightforward and actionable 4-step process (including an array of tools to check out) for uncovering and prioritizing the best keywords for your SEO campaigns.

5. The top 10 posts by comment volume

By the end of 2016, commenting on the Moz Blog took a sharp 180°. We implemented sophisticated filters to catch a higher volume of spam, with even more improvements in the works. I declared it my personal quest to improve comment quality (I can only deny so many invitations to join the Illuminati before it starts to get freaky), and we worked to spark creative discussion from the get-go.

Without further ado, I give you the top blog posts in 2016 that struck a chatty chord:

1. My Single Best SEO Tip for Improved Web Traffic by Cyrus Shepard, January 27th
“If content is king, then the user is queen, and she rules the universe.” Are you focusing too much on the content, rather than the user? In his last post as a Mozzer, Cyrus Shepard offers his single greatest SEO tip for improving your web traffic.
2. 8 Old School SEO Practices That Are No Longer Effective – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, April 29th
Are you guilty of living in the past? Using methods that were once tried-and-true can be alluring, but it can also prove dangerous to your search strategy. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand spells out eight old school SEO practices that you should ditch in favor of more effective and modern alternatives.
3. Weird, Crazy Myths About Link Building in SEO You Should Probably Ignore – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, September 9th
From where to how to when, there are a number of erroneous claims about link building floating around the SEO world. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand sets the record straight on 8 of the more common claims he’s noticed lately.
4. Linking Internally and Externally from Your Site – Dangers, Opportunities, Risk and Reward – Whiteboard Friday by Rand Fishkin, April 15th
Navigating linking practices can be a treacherous process. Sometimes it feels like a penalty is lurking around every corner. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand talks about the ins and outs of linking internally and externally, identifying pitfalls and opportunities both.
5. How to Build a Facebook Funnel That Converts – Whiteboard Friday by Ryan Stewart, October 14th
Are you getting the most out of your Facebook ads? In this guest-hosted Whiteboard Friday, Ryan Stewart outlines his process for using remarketing and targeted content creation to boost conversions.
6. How Long Does Link Building Take to Influence Rankings? by Kristina Kledzik, August 21st
The eternal question: How much time does it take for a link to affect rankings? Kristina Kledzik breaks out the entire process from start to finish.
7. Accidental SEO Tests: How 301 Redirects Are Likely Impacting Your Brand by Brian Wood, January 19th
Those 301 redirects could be more costly to your brand than you previously imagined. Brian Wood dives into the results of an accidental SEO test that turned out to be serendipitous.
8. The 9 Most Common Local SEO Myths, Dispelled by Joy Hawkins, April 19th
Have you taken any of these statements as truth? In this post, Google My Business Top Contributor Joy Hawkins shares and debunks the Local SEO myths she runs into most frequently.
9. 301 Redirects Rules Change: What You Need to Know for SEO by Cyrus Shepard, August 1st
Google blew our minds when they said 3xx redirects no longer lose PageRank. Cyrus is here to give you the low-down on what this means for SEO.
10. Four Ads on Top: The Wait Is Over by Dr. Peter J. Meyers, February 19th
In a 2-week timeframe, Google AdWords top ad blocks with 4 ads jumped from 1% to 36%, and right-column ads disappeared entirely (moving to the bottom-left position).

6. The top 10 community comments by thumbs up

One of the best things about the Moz Blog is what happens in the comments section. You folks support each other immensely, and that’s nowhere as apparent as in how you interact. The top comments from 2016 tended to be on the longer side, thoughtful, TAGFEE, and full of love and concern for our Moz community when times got rough. These are the top comments from 2016, as voted by you.

1. Gianluca Fiorelli | August 17th
Commented on Moz is Doubling Down on Search
2. Gianluca Fiorelli | February 5th
Commented on Can SEOs Stop Worrying About Keywords and Just Focus on Topics? – Whiteboard Friday
3. Rand Fishkin | March 28th
Commented on Are Keywords Really Dead? An Experiment
4. Mark Jackson | August 17th
Commented on Moz is Doubling Down on Search
5. Devendra Saxena | February 19th
Commented on Four Ads on Top: The Wait Is Over
6. Gianluca Fiorelli | March 18th
Commented on How to Create 10x Content – Whiteboard Friday
7. Tomek Obirek | April 15th
Commented on Linking Internally and Externally from Your Site – Dangers, Opportunities, Risk and Reward – Whiteboard Friday
8. Gianluca Fiorelli | August 2nd
Commented on Wake Up, SEOs – the NEW New Google is Here
9. Gianluca Fiorelli | January 27th
Commented on My Single Best SEO Tip for Improved Web Traffic
10. Wil Reynolds | September 8th
Commented on The Future of the Moz Community

7. The top 10 community member commenters by total thumbs up

When you’re in charge of the Moz Blog, you get to know your regular commenters. These folks put a great deal of time and effort into stating facts, asking questions, and more than anything else, reading. Say hello to the top community commenters of 2016 by total thumbs up earned!

1. Shalu Singh, username Shalusingh
MozPoints:

505 | Rank:

214

2. Larry Kim, username larry.kim
MozPoints: 2,809 | Rank: 34
3. Samuel Scott, username

SamuelScott
MozPoints:

3,694 | Rank: 25

4. Mustansar Iqbal, username Ikkie
MozPoints: 1,026 | Rank: 127
5. Joe Robison, username

Joe.Robison
MozPoints:

1,218 | Rank: 111

6. Joy Hawkins, username

JoyHawkins
MozPoints: 580 | Rank: 190

7. Tom Capper, username

Tom.Capper
MozPoints:

905 | Rank:

134

8. Tomas Vaitulevicius, username

TomasVaitulevicius
MozPoints:

200 | Rank:

566

9. Alexandra Tachalova, username

Alex-T
MozPoints:

468 | Rank:

224

10. Jennifer Slegg, username

jenstar
MozPoints:

784 | Rank:

147

Category-specific RSS feeds (Whiteboard Friday fans, rejoice!)

Historically, the only way to subscribe to Moz Blog updates via RSS feed was to commit to the entire thing — every post, every topic, even if you were only into content marketing and didn’t care a fig for anything technical.

That was back in 2016, though. In this bold new odd-numbered world, we now have RSS feeds for our most popular categories. Whiteboard Friday devotees, it’s time to party.

Here’s a list of feeds you can now subscribe to; if you have a desire to follow a category we haven’t covered here, let me know in the comments and we may be able to make it a reality. (Key word: may. I’m only a Level 5 blog mage, after all.)


Onward and upward!

Thanks to everyone who works and plays so hard to keep the Moz community thriving; this place could never be what it is without our readers, commenters, authors, and behind-the-scenes Mozzers. Much earnest thanks to Moz Blog veteran Trevor Klein for some key SQL help, which made my life while writing this post easier by leaps and bounds.

I can’t wait to see what our next year brings. Hope to see you somewhere on this list come 2018!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 9 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Data-driven marketing strategies from the fastest-growing online retailers

 

Since our acquisition by Magento Commerce earlier this year, Magento Analytics (formerly RJMetrics) has been more focused than ever on our mission to inspire and empower data-driven merchants.

One of the most exciting benefits of the acquisition has been our unprecedented access to Magento Premier Partners like dotmailer. By combining our rich data analytics with their best practices in e-mail marketing, we can create a wealth of new offerings and insights for the merchants we serve.

Our most popular research report, The Ecommerce Growth Benchmark, demonstrates these benefits through the lens of e-mail marketing automation. Below, I recap the top three findings from our report and share their implications for your marketing strategy.

The best companies are winners on every dimension

Our benchmark report divided retailers into four quartiles based on their overall revenue growth rates in their first three years of operation. As it turns out, the top quartile merchants weren’t just the best performers on one key metric – they won on all of them!

Whether it was revenue, number of orders, repeat purchase rates, average order value, or customer lifetime value, the top quartile of companies outperformed their slower-growing counterparts across the board.

 

This has big implications when it comes to marketing strategy. As it turns out, there is no silver bullet or focus area that can make you a best-of-breed performer. The top merchants do it all, developing finely-tuned marketing strategies around customer acquisition, customer retention, and cart size.

Marketing automation systems like dotmailer are the key to managing these kinds of complex, multi-faceted strategies. The simultaneous use of platforms like Magento Analytics allow you to make sure your overall business is performing in a way that justifies your investments.

Fast loyalty drives fast growth

While the average retailer ends up driving about 50% of their monthly sales from repeat purchasers in the long run, our study found that the top-performing retailers are driving repeat sales faster and earlier in their lives than their industry peers.

Specifically, we found that top-performing merchants derive 22% of their revenue in their first month of operations from repeat purchasers. Think about that for a moment: since it’s the merchant’s first month of operation, there is no history of repeat purchasers to make these purchases; that 22% could only have come from buyers who came back to buy again in their first month as a customer!

rjmimage2

 

The lesson here is clear: marketing to your existing customers can never be an afterthought. These merchants were ready to drive repeat purchases from day one, and you should be too.

There has never been a better time to grow fast

A simple cohort analysis revealed that newer ecommerce companies are growing faster than their older counterparts in their first few years of business. This trend makes sense when you consider how rapidly the barriers to entry and scale are dropping for online retailers.

rjmimage3

 

This means that the opportunity for emerging merchants is large, but the competition is also tougher than ever. Faster growth means a more efficient market and more competitors; differentiation is the key to survival. Using the right tools for the job can transform your business into a distinctive, data-driven powerhouse of growth.

We look forward to collaborating with our friends at dotmailer to bring you more data-driven insights and advice in the months to come. Until then, we hope you’ll take Magento Analytics for a free test drive and stay tuned for more exciting news about our progress as part of the Magento team.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Results from the Local SEO Ranking Factors Study presented at SMX East

Wonder what factors correlate with strong local rankings? Contributor Christine Churchill summarizes the results of a recent local ranking factors study presented at SMX East 2016.

The post Results from the Local SEO Ranking Factors Study presented at SMX East appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 year ago from feeds.searchengineland.com