T.M. Lewin’s seamless journey, from proposal to handover

Earlier this year T.M. Lewin joined the dotmailer family, and we’re delighted to have them! They had an incredibly unique and large scope that involved both Enterprise Onboarding and Abandoned Cart Onboarding services and required extensive involvement from the Professional Services and Customer Success teams. This included myself (Digital Marketing Specialist (DMS) – Onboarding and Managed Services), Custom Technical Solutions, Deliverability, Creative Services and 3rd line Support.

This was such an enjoyable project to work on, especially with the relaxed yet motivated vibe we experienced with the T.M. Lewin team. We all pulled together, knew what needed to be done and when it needed to be done by. Communication internally and externally was clear, and we had set goals to strive towards.

I joined one of the final pitches with Sales, and, from an onboarding perspective, I feel this really helped the client understand how we work. Plus, it provided them with a great experience to meet the long-term team before signing on the dotted line. We covered at top-level how we work, how other teams would be involved and what a project plan would look like with an onboarding of this size.

Overall, our involvement in those pitches – as part of the longer-term team – helped us set clear expectations, develop cross-departmental timelines and ascertain who the points of contact were for certain queries.

Enterprise Onboarding

Essentially, this is a more complex onboarding process across a longer timescale. It involves frequent contact with a designated DMS (weekly catch-ups etc.) as well as more support and guidance from the Key Account Management team. T.M. Lewin came on board as a Key Account client, and they were delighted with how the whole process went.

Abandoned Cart Onboarding

Separate, yet similar to general onboarding; your DMS will work with dotmailer 3rd line and your developer/agency to implement this product. It involves more technical heads and can take longer to implement as every ecommerce platform behaves differently. To find out more about Abandoned Cart onboarding and who and what’s involved, you can take a look at this overview for the marketeer.

Testimonial from Richard Jones, Head of CRM at T.M. Lewin

When we were looking for our new ESP, we needed a flexible platform that allowed us to access the power within our data; simply, quickly and effectively. Our old platform was clunky, rigid and slow. Not ideal when you’ve got big ambitions.

Throughout the pitch and integration, dotmailer – both as a platform and a team – offered us the perfect blend of simple UI, expert technicians and brilliant tacticians to help us map out our world and our future ambitions.

Across every point, from data integration, onboarding and the first steps towards a new, fully automated, scientifically fluid world, they’ve been proactive, warm and brilliant.

The T.M. Lewin team is small, not particularly technical, but still brilliant so we needed a fair amount of hand holding through the onboarding. dotmailer’s expertise, response times and the simplicity of advice they’ve offered, particularly Shan (DMS), Ross (Key Account Management) and Darryl (Head of Custom Technical Solutions) has been integral to getting us up to speed with not a single road bump. Impressive.

In a nutshell…

This onboarding was a great experience for myself and the various teams involved. We had a lot of opportunities to test our knowledge and gained some really useful insight and information from a more technical perspective.

It’s been a joy getting involved in the technical scope and implementation; I have to thank David Gibbon and Boris Maslennikov in particular, whose expertise helped guide what was an unusually structured project.

I thoroughly enjoyed looking at T.M. Lewin’s existing customer journeys, scoping out new ones and seeing how we can use insight data to refine the user experience. Given the chance, I’d definitely onboard these guys again.

Want to know more?

Want to know more about the managed services add-ons, plan credits and onboarding packages available to you?

Reach out to your Account Manager, or feel free to book in a platform demo with one of our Sales Reps.

The post T.M. Lewin’s seamless journey, from proposal to handover appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 2 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Time to Act: Review Responses Just Evolved from "Extra" to "Expected"

Posted by MiriamEllis

I’ve advocated the use of Google’s owner response review feature since it first rolled out in 2010. This vital vehicle defends brand reputation and revenue, offering companies a means of transforming dissatisfied consumers into satisfied ones, supporting retention so that less has to be spent on new customer acquisition. I consider review responses to be a core customer service responsibility. Yet, eight years into the existence of this feature, marketing forums are still filled with entry-level questions like:

  • Should I respond to reviews?
  • Should I respond to positive reviews?
  • How should I respond to negative reviews?

Over the years, I’ve seen different local SEO consultants reply in differing degrees to these common threads, but as of May 11, 2018, both agencies and brands woke to a new day: the day on which Google announced it would be emailing notifications like this to consumers when a business responds to their reviews, prompting them to view the reply.

Surveys indicate that well over 50% of consumers already expect responses within days of reviewing a business. With Google’s rollout, we can assume that this number is about to rise.

Why is this noteworthy news? I’ll explain exactly that in this post, plus demo how Moz Local can be a significant help to owners and marketers in succeeding in this new environment.

When “extra” becomes “expected”

In the past, owner responses may have felt like something extra a business could do to improve management of its reputation. Perhaps a company you’re marketing has been making the effort to respond to negative reviews, at the very least, but you’ve let replying to positive reviews slide. Or maybe you respond to reviews when you can get around to it, with days or weeks transpiring between consumer feedback and brand reaction.

Google’s announcement is important for two key reasons:

1) It signals that Google is turning reviews into a truly interactive feature, in keeping with so much else they’ve rolled out to the Knowledge Panel in recent times. Like booking buttons and Google Questions & Answers, notifications of owner responses are Google’s latest step towards making Knowledge Panels transactional platforms instead of static data entities. Every new feature brings us that much closer to Google positioning itself between providers and patrons for as many transactional moments as possible.

2) It signals a major turning point in consumer expectations. In the past, reviewers have left responses from motives of “having their say,” whether that’s to praise a business, warn fellow consumers, or simply document their experiences.

Now, imagine a patron who writes a negative review of two different restaurants he dined at for Sunday lunch and dinner. On Monday, he opens his email to find a Google notification that Restaurant A has left an owner response sincerely apologizing and reasonably explaining why service was unusually slow that weekend, but that Restaurant B is meeting his complaint about a rude waiter with dead air.

“So, Restaurant A cares about me, and Restaurant B couldn’t care less,” the consumer is left to conclude, creating an emotional memory that could inform whether he’s ever willing to give either business a second chance in the future.

Just one experience of receiving an owner response notification will set the rules of the game from here on out, making all future businesses that fail to respond seem inaccessible, neglectful, and even uncaring. It’s the difference between reviewers narrating their experiences from random motives, and leaving feedback with the expectation of being heard and answered.

I will go so far as to predict that Google’s announcement ups the game for all review platforms, because it will make owner responses to consumer sentiment an expected, rather than extra, effort.

The burden is on brands

Because no intelligent business would believe it can succeed in modern commerce while appearing unreachable or unconcerned, Google’s announcement calls for a priority shift. For brands large and small, it may not be an easy one, but it should look something like this:

  • Negative reviews are now direct cries for help to our business; we will respond with whatever help we can give within X number of hours or days upon receipt
  • Positive reviews are now thank-you notes directly to our company; we will respond with gratitude within X number of hours or days upon receipt

Defining X is going to have to depend on the resources of your organization, but in an environment in which consumers expect your reply, the task of responding must now be moved from the back burner to a hotter spot on the stovetop. Statistics differ in past assessments of consumer expectations of response times:

  • In 2016, GetFiveStars found that 15.6% of consumers expected a reply with 1–3 hours, and 68.3% expected a reply within 1–3 days of leaving a review.
  • In 2017, RevLocal found that 52% of consumers expected responses within 7 days.
  • Overall, 30% of survey respondents told BrightLocal in 2017 that owner responses were a factor they looked at in judging a business.

My own expectation is that all of these numbers will now rise as a result of Google’s new function, meaning that the safest bet will be the fastest possible response. If resources are limited, I recommend prioritizing negative sentiment, aiming for a reply within hours rather than days as the best hope of winning back a customer. “Thank yous” for positive sentiment can likely wait for a couple of days, if absolutely necessary.

It’s inspiring to know that a recent Location3 study found that brands which do a good job of responding to reviews saw an average conversion rate of 13.9%, versus lackluster responders whose conversion rate was 10.4%. Depending on what you sell, those 3.5 points could be financially significant! But it’s not always easy to be optimally responsive.

If your business is small, accelerating response times can feel like a burden because of lack of people resources. If your business is a large, multi-location enterprise, the burden may lie in organizing awareness of hundreds of incoming reviews in a day, as well as keeping track of which reviews have been responded to and which haven’t.

The good news is…

Moz Local can help

The screenshot, above, is taken from the Moz Local dashboard. If you’re a customer, just log into your Moz Local account and go to your review section. From the “sources” section, choose “Google” — you’ll see the option to filter your reviews by “replied” and “not replied.” You’ll instantly be able to see which reviews you haven’t yet responded to. From there, simply use the in-dashboard feature that enables you to respond to your (or your clients’) reviews, without having to head over to your GMB dashboard or log into a variety of different clients’ GMB dashboards. So easy!

I highly recommend that all our awesome customers do this today and be sure you’ve responded to all of your most recent reviews. And, in the future, if you’re working your way through a stack of new, incoming Google reviews, this function should make it a great deal easier to keep organized about which ones you’ve checked off and which ones are still awaiting your response. I sincerely hope this function makes your work more efficient!

Need some help setting the right review response tone?

Please check out Mastering the Owner Response to the Quintet of Google My Business Reviews, which I published in 2016 to advocate responsiveness. It will walk you through these typical types of reviews you’ll be receiving:

  • “I love you!”
  • “I haven’t made up my mind yet.”
  • “There was hair in my taco…”
  • “I’m actually your competitor!”
  • “I’m citing illegal stuff.”

The one update I’d make to the advice in the above piece, given Google’s rollout of the new notification function, would be to increase the number of positive reviews to which you’re responding. In 2016, I suggested that enterprises managing hundreds of locations should aim to express gratitude for at least 10% of favorable reviews. In 2018, I’d say reply with thanks to as many of these as you possibly can. Why? Because reviews are now becoming more transactional than ever, and if a customer says, “I like you,” it’s only polite to say, “Thanks!”. As more customers begin to expect responsiveness, failure to acknowledge praise could feel uncaring.

I would also suggest that responses to negative reviews more strongly feature a plea to the customer to contact the business so that things can be “made right.” GetFiveStars co-founder, Mike Blumenthal, is hoping that Google might one day create a private channel for brands and consumers to resolve complaints, but until that happens, definitely keep in mind that:

  1. The new email alerts will ensure that more customers realize you’ve responded to their negative sentiment.
  2. If, while “making things right” in the public response, you also urge the unhappy customer to let you make things “more right” in person, you will enhance your chances of retaining him.
  3. If you are able to publicly or privately resolve a complaint, the customer may feel inspired to amend his review and raise your star rating; over time, more customers doing this could significantly improve your conversions and, possibly, your local search rankings.
  4. All potential customers who see your active responses to complaints will understand that your policies are consumer-friendly, which should increase the likelihood of them choosing your business for transactions.

Looking ahead

One of the most interesting aspects I’m considering as of the rollout of response notifications is whether it may ultimately impact the tone of reviews themselves. In the past, some reviewers have given way to excesses in their sentiment, writing about companies in the ugliest possible language… language I’ve always wanted to hope they wouldn’t use face-to-face with other human beings at the place of business. I’m wondering now if knowing there’s a very good chance that companies are responding to feedback could lessen the instances of consumers taking wild, often anonymous potshots at brands and create a more real-world, conversational environment.

In other words, instead of: “You overcharged me $3 for a soda and I know it’s because you’re [expletive] scammers, liars, crooks!!! Everyone beware of this company!!!”

We might see: “Hey guys, I just noticed a $3 overcharge on my receipt. I’m not too happy about this.”

The former scenario is honestly embarrassing. Trying to make someone feel better when they’ve just called you a thief feels a bit ridiculous and depressing. But the latter scenario is, at least, situation-appropriate instead of blown out of all proportion, creating an opening for you and your company to respond well and foster loyalty.

I can’t guarantee that reviewers will tone it down a bit if they feel more certain of being heard, but I’m hoping it will go that way in more and more cases.

What do you think? How will Google’s new function impact the businesses you market and the reviewers you serve? Please share your take and your tips with our community!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 3 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018

On a gorgeous April day, over 1,000 international marketers gathered at the Park Plaza in the heart of London to discover even greater digital potential. This year’s event was jam-packed with inspiring talks, breakout sessions and technical workshops designed to help our delegates advance their day-to-day marketing. There was so much going on during the day that you had to be super switched on to catch it all. In case you missed any of the highlights, here are our top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018:

  1. Powerful and empowering women in business

It’s safe to say that the 2018 Summit played host to some serious titans of the industry, and we were thrilled to see the agenda opened and closed by two powerful and empowering women. Natalie Nahai, author and web psychologist, showed us how she advises Fortune 500 companies like Google, eBay and Unilever how to use online persuasion to win over and retain business. We learned about homophily, cognitive load and how to engage with customers in a more meaningful way.

Our keynote speaker this year was Baroness Karren Brady, one of the most influential, high profile and respected female business leaders in the UK and rated among the 50 most inspirational people in the world. Karren gifted us her own top 10 ingredients for success along with a witty, provocative and inspiring insight into her career journey.

  1. GDPR reassurance

It was easy to predict that GDPR would feature heavily on the agenda this year, but the key takeaways were far from dry, doomy and gloomy. In his primary session, dotmailer’s Strategy & Insight Director, Skip Fidura, showed us to treat GDPR as an opportunity to strengthen our data and build more compelling, trusted relationships with customers through automation. And Rachel Aldighieri, Managing Director at the DMA, got us thinking about how marketers can work effectively and creatively within these new parameters.

  1. 1,142 delegates

After welcoming over 600 marketers last year at dotmailer’s inaugural Summit, we set out to make 2018 a year of international empowerment. Watching over 1,000 digital marketers discover, grow and network throughout the day was one of our highlights. In fact, dotmailer’s CEO, Phil Draper, let it get to his head a little. Here he is pretending to be his favorite artist, Ed Sheeran:

  1. Twitter trending

While the hottest news on 19th April was undoubtedly the 26° heat (welcome to the UK!), it was awesome to see #dotmailersummit take the no.2 spot on Twitter as an equally hot topic. We loved checking in throughout the day to see so many empowered marketers tweet their key learnings from our knowledgeable speakers. Plus, it’s always good to know the lunch went down a treat!

  1. 849 app downloads

The dotmailer Summit 2018 welcomed 30 international speakers to deliver on 27 session topics across three speaking tracks – so we wanted to make sure delegates could get organized. Marketers in attendance were able to follow, schedule and query every session using our free dotmailer Summit app. With ¾ of attendees making use of the app on the day, you can bet it’ll be back for 2019.

  1. Launching an evolved dotmailer

2018 Summit delegates were able to get a first look at the brand-new innovations happening within the dotmailer platform. With 27% of revenue generated by automation over batch-and-blast campaigns, marketers need to be able to flex their mailing muscles. dotmailer users now have access to 30 new free automation programs to help them deliver on rising customer expectations. In order to help our customers hit every contact on the right channel, we’ve incorporated Facebook Messenger into the platform, and our new COMAPI acquisition brings sophisticated SMS capabilities on-board. Add free Facebook Audience and Google Adword Re-targeting to every account, chuck BigQuery into the mix and you’ve got a souped-up omnichannel automation platform with no need to pay for a complementary tech provider. Oh – and we’ve added a native product recommendations tool. Innovating dotmailer, empowering you!

  1. Hitting the Mark 2018

Summit attendees were the first to gain access to insight from dotmailer’s biggest and beefiest benchmarking report, Hitting the Mark. Attendees were able to snap up the latest statistics on segmentation, as well as learn how many brands are still leaving money on the table by failing to send an abandoned cart email. Plus, we revealed this year’s number one marketer. Want to find out for yourself? Download the full report.

  1. Wayne Hemmingway

One of the most inspirational talks from the day came from Red or Dead and Hemingway designs co-founder, Wayne Hemingway, who showed the audience that “Design is about improving the things that matter in life.” The compelling businessman – who’s provided sustainable designs for tube uniforms, student accommodation and entire housing estates – entertained and inspired with his personal anecdotes. To achieve perfection in design, Hemmingway urged marketers: “Spot something that’s wrong and make it right.”

  1. Customer insight

At dotmailer, we know our customers are true superstars, so it was awesome to see Charlotte Hilton from Sika take the stage to show audiences how they’ve harness automation to build trust in B2B marketing. Alongside Charlotte, attendees were able to hear success stories from Tom Wheatley of Shortlist Media and Sarah Elphick of Forest Holidays – to name a few! See the agenda for a full list of dotmailer superstars who lent their expertise on the day.

  1. Our partners in tech

From our superb Gold partners, Magento and Shopify plus, who helped realise the Summit 2018, to the inspiring session on trust and social proof from Neil Bayton at Trustpilot, attendees were able to access expertise from a seriously eclectic mix of tech experts. See the full list of partners for 2018.

 

Don’t believe the hype? Check out some videos from the day.

See you next year!

The post Top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

dotmailer receives ‘Great User Experience’ title for email marketing software – from reputable business software directory

Leading business software directory FinancesOnline believes businesses and organizations can highly benefit from an email automation marketing platform that is both feature-rich and easy to use. FinancesOnline’s experts found this in dotmailer, thus they gave us a positive 8.8 score and bestowed to us their prestigious Great User Experience and Rising Star awards.

 

The Great User Experience and Rising Star recognition for online email marketing software is given to systems that have satisfied clients with well-designed functionalities alongside a user-friendly and intuitive interface. This can be attributed to dotmailer’s unique drag-and-drop template builder that allow users to effortlessly create impressive email templates within a few minutes. It was also one of the reasons why our solution was recommended in the platform’s ‘what is email marketing software’ guide.

 

FinancesOnline believes dotmailer’s throng of functionalities enables users to remain “on top of every single phase of their email marketing campaigns and other related activities.” Aside from easily creating emails, FinancesOnline said our software can help users “fully optimize their email marketing strategies and get the best results” through various services including, but not limited to, campaign management, creative studio and strategic services. With these, users can significantly boost click-through rates and grow their business.

 

Businesses are also safeguarded with dotmailer’s scalability and custom-built integrations. “As your business needs develop and become more demanding and diverse, dotmailer is more than capable of growing with your enterprise,” wrote FinancesOnline’s experts.

The post dotmailer receives ‘Great User Experience’ title for email marketing software – from reputable business software directory appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 3 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

The four smartest projects from dotmailer’s Hack Week 2017

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Our biggest hack week ever

Although our Hack Week is now in its fifth year, this was the biggest: 38 hackers, five locations, six days. The aim was to build – in the fastest way possible – something new, something left field, that could benefit marketers (or in some cases, us). Here are the top three (and my personal favourite).


The top three hacks

Third place: Logo subscriber

Our Minsk-based developer Darya Pesina hacked a mobile app that used AR to re-invent how email signups could work. Want to scan a logo to sign up? No problem. Want to see what brands are nearby and sign up to them? Go ahead.

This hack was also joint winner in our CEO Award; I was in the ‘judging room’ and Milan could see how this could legitimately create new ways to incentivize signups, with localized special offers creating new subscribers.


🥈 Second place: Live images

This team set out to see how images in emails could be more dynamic. They ended up with a method of streaming image content continuously, so images could look and behave differently for every recipient.

They showed a countdown timer that was always correct, no matter when the email was opened, along with a stock ticker that always used live information.

But they also showed examples of loading an image of a restaurant that’s nearby, and pictures of the weather local to the recspient.

Hacked by our Head of Development Andy Gretton and Development Manager Sergey Shchegrikovich, this was the second joint winner in the CEO Award.


🥇 First place: AR report viewer

Another AR app, but this time for our users: the hack opened up new possibilities for visualizing campaign statistics.

For example, it used virtual Winstons (lots of them!) to show open and click data; the pack of Winstons would begin forming two groups as a campaign was sent – one that represented openers and one non-openers. Then they would reform to create groups of clickers and non-clickers, and then show device breakdown, and so on.

Worked on by Croydon-based developers Darran Jugdoyal, Joseph Appleyard, Grant Lodge and Robert Turner (with the help of a Google Pixel phone).


My pick for standout hack

Is it a tad narcissistic to pick a hack that prominently featured my head? Probably, but I’m not going to let that stop me.

My pick goes to the team Disappointing Demoer (which was actually just our front-end developer Claire Chambers, based in Liverpool).

The hack saw Claire looking at ways of making email more interactive – and what’s more interactive than a game? The result got the recipient tapping flying heads (in this case, for reasons I don’t fully understand, mine) and avoiding Floyd the dog to increase their score – all without leaving the email. In another example, a quiz was built into the email. Imagine what that could do to your engagement rates.


Interested in being part of Hack Week 2018?

If you fancy a bit of marketing tech hacking in 2018, there may be a place for you in the dotmailer team. We’re looking for all sorts – check out the list and apply instantly online.

The post The four smartest projects from dotmailer’s Hack Week 2017 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 7 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

From manual to automatic: how automation saved Minor Entertainment 50 hours’ admin time

When I ask clients why they’re not yet using marketing automation, the top reasons are either data gaps or a lack of available time/budget.

Minor Entertainment Ltd was one of those organizations who hadn’t yet realized the potential of marketing automation. The company specializes in spectacular family theater events, with its most famous being In the Night Garden Live which typically tours UK cities from May to August.

Before introducing marketing automation to its communications strategy, Minor Entertainment Ltd used to collect ticket information via a third-party data warehouse which offered a limited integration with dotmailer. The lack of integration meant that its marketing team were forced to manually send emails to ticket holders to let them know about the event, location and merchandising available, which was becoming extremely time consuming.

After an initial data assessment, we identified a way to improve the current custom integration so it’d provide the data we needed to build our marketing automation. We named the program the ‘Get Ready automation’ because the communications it delivers are aimed at prepping ticketholders about their upcoming show. Using dotmailer and the newly enabled flow of data, the program automatically triggers a series of personalized emails providing people with the right information at the right times.

What were the results?

The Get Ready program has resulted in huge efficiencies, reducing human error to zero. We’ve estimated that the company is now saving around 50 hours of admin time a year; not only a significant cost saving but it’s enabling the marketing team to focus on more fun and productive activities.

Jenni McNally, who’s the Marketing Manager at Minor Entertainment Ltd, commented on the results of the work: “We are delighted with our new automation program. It has saved us an enormous amount of admin time.”

How can I get marketing automation off the ground?

If you’re an extremely busy team, making time to save time is often the hardest part. Here are a few things to consider to help you on your journey to smarter marketing:

  1. Find the right tool: the program builder is available in every dotmailer account and it’s easy to use. Here’s a link to our automation videos to show you how to get started.
  2. Plan: if you’re super busy, draw up a priority list of automations and build them into long-term plan. Having a roadmap will help you to keep on track and avoid getting overwhelmed. As they say, a goal without a plan is just a wish!
  3. Improve: start simple and build up as you go. Build, measure, learn and repeat.

Here’s a list of automations to get your started:

  1. Welcome series: introduce new subscribers to your brand, with a series of emails that move prospects closer towards a purchase.
  2. Transactional programs: spice up functional transactional emails, like order confirmations, so they’re inspiring and better promote your brand.
  3. Post-purchase programs: build trust in your brand and help new customers get the most out of their product with helpful, relevant content.
  4. Abandoned cart program: rescue lost sales by reminding customers who’ve left items in their cart to come back and complete the purchase.
  5. Abandoned browse programs: use web behavioural tracking with automation to send follow-up emails with content based on what users have browsed.
  6. Product replenishment programs: remind customers to re-stock with automated emails when you have a good idea that their supplies are dwindling.
  7. Customer retention programs: from loyalty programs to brand-building content, you can automate emails that keep your brand front of mind.
  8. Recommendation and upsell programs: use customers’ past purchase and web browsing behaviour to automate product recommendation and upsell emails.
  9. Lost customer programs: reduce your attrition rate by using automated programs to send incentives to buy again or capture why they left.
  10. Date-driven programs: use the valuable data you have to get in touch during different times of the year, such as ‘happy birthday’ emails.

Get your free copy of our ‘Making time to save time’ guide which’ll put you on the path to marketing automation:

Should you need any help to create your automation roadmap or in getting your programs set up, please don’t hesitate to reach out to your Account Manager. We offer Automation Kickstarters, custom integrations and collaborative implementation workshops.

The post From manual to automatic: how automation saved Minor Entertainment 50 hours’ admin time appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 10 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

5 Tips to Help Show ROI from Local SEO

Posted by JoyHawkins

Earlier this year, when I was first writing my advanced local SEO training, I reached out to some users who work for local SEO agencies and asked them what they’d like more training on. The biggest topic I got as a result was related to tracking and reporting value to small business owners.

My clients will often forward me reports from their prior SEO company, expressing that they have no idea what they were getting for their money. Some of the most common complaints I see with these reports are:

  • Too much use of marketing lingo (“Bounce Rate,” “CTR,” etc.)
  • Way too much data
  • No representation of what impact the work done had on the business itself (did it get them more customers?)

If a small business owner is giving you hundreds or thousands of dollars every month, how do you prove to them they’re getting value from it? There’s a lot to dig into with this topic — I included a full six pages on it in my training. Today I wanted to share some of the most successful tips that I use with my own clients.


1. Stop sending automated Google Analytics reports

If the goal is to show the customer what they’re getting from their investment, you probably won’t achieve it by simply sending them an Analytics report each month. Google Analytics is a powerful tool, but it only looks awesome to you because you’re a marketer. Over the past year, I’ve looked at many monthly reports that made my head spin — it’s just too much data. The average SMB isn’t going to be able to look at those reports and figure out how their bounce rate decreasing somehow means you’re doing a great job at SEO.

2. Make conversions the focus of your report

What does the business owner care about? Hint: it’s not how you increased the ranking for one of their 50 tracked keywords this month. No, what they care about is how much additional business you drove to their business. This should be the focus of the report you send them.

3. Use dynamic number insertion to track calls

If you’re not already doing this, you’re really killing your ability to show value. I don’t have a single SEO or SEM client that isn’t using call tracking. I use Call Tracking Metrics, but CallRail is another one that works well, too. This allows you to see the sources of incoming calls. Unlike slapping a call tracking number on your website, dynamic number insertion won’t mess up NAP consistency.

The bonus here is that you can set up these calls as goals in Google Analytics. Using the Landing Page report, you can see which pages on the site were responsible for getting that call. Instead of saying, “Hey customer, a few months ago I created this awesome page of content for you,” you can say “Hey customer, a few months ago, I added this page to your site and as a result, it’s got you 5 more calls.”
Conversion goal completion in Google Analytics

4. Estimate revenue

I remember sitting in a session a couple years ago when Dev Basu from Powered by Search told me about this tactic. I had a lightbulb moment, wondering why the heck I didn’t think to do this before.

The concept is simple: Ask the client what the average lifetime value of their customer is. Next, ask them what their average closing ratio is on Internet leads. Take those numbers and, based on the number of conversions, you can calculate their estimated revenue.

Formula: Lifetime Value of a Customer x Closing Ratio (%) x Number of Conversions = Estimated Revenue

Bonus tip: Take this a step further and show them that for every dollar they pay you, you make them $X. Obviously, if the lifetime value of the customer is high, these numbers look a lot better. For example, an attorney could look like this:Example monthly ROI for an attorneyWhereas an insurance agent would look like this:
Example monthly ROI for an insurance agent

5. Show before/after screenshots, not a ranking tracker.

I seriously love ranking trackers. I spend a ton of time every week looking at reports in Bright Local for my clients. However, I really believe ranking trackers are best used for marketers, not business owners. How many times have you had a client call you freaking out because they noticed a drop in ranking for one keyword? I chose to help stop this trend by not including ranking reports in my monthly reporting and have never regretted that decision.

Instead, if I want to highlight a significant ranking increase that happened as a result of SEO, I can do that by showing the business owner a visual — something they will actually understand. This is where I use Bright Local’s screenshots; I can see historically how a SERP used to look versus how it looks now.


At the end of the day, to show ROI you need to think like a business owner, not a marketer. If your goals match the goals of the business owner (which is usually to increase calls), make sure that’s what you’re conveying in your monthly reporting.

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Reblogged 1 year ago from tracking.feedpress.it

What You Need to Know About Duplicate GMB Listings [Excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO]

Posted by JoyHawkins

Recently, I’ve had a lot of people ask me how to deal with duplicate listings in Google My Business now that MapMaker is dead. Having written detailed instructions outlining different scenarios for the advanced local SEO training manual I started selling over at LocalU, I thought it’d be great to give Moz readers a sample of 5 pages from the manual outlining some best practices.


What you need to know about duplicate GMB listings

Before you start, you need to find out if the listing is verified. If the listing has an “own this business” or “claim this business” option, it is not currently verified. If missing that label, it means it is verified — there is nothing you can do until you get ownership or have it unverified (if you’re the one who owns it in GMB). This should be your first step before you proceed with anything below.

Storefronts

  • Do the addresses on the two listings match? If the unverified duplicate has the same address as the verified listing, you should contact Google My Business support and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the addresses do not match, find out if the business used to be at that address at some point in time.
    • If the business has never existed there:
      • Pull up the listing on Maps
      • Press “Suggest an edit”
      • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
      • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

  • If the duplicate lists an address that is an old address (they were there at some point but have moved), you will want to have the duplicate marked as moved.

Service area businesses

  • Is the duplicate listing verified? If it is, you will first have to get it unverified or gain access to it. Once you’ve done that, contact Google My Business and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the duplicate is not verified, you can have it removed from Maps since service area businesses are not permitted on Google Maps. Google My Business allows them, but any unverified listing would follow Google Maps rules, not Google My Business. To remove it:
    • Pull up the listing on Maps
    • Press “Suggest an edit”
    • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
    • Select “Private” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

Practitioner listings

Public-facing professionals (doctors, lawyers, dentists, realtors, etc.) are allowed their own listings separate from the office they work for, unless they’re the only public-facing professional at that office. In that case, they are considered a solo practitioner and there should only be one listing, formatted as “Business Name: Professional Name.”

Solo practitioner with two listings

This is probably one of the easiest scenarios to fix because solo practitioners are only supposed to have one listing. If you have a scenario where there’s a listing for both the practice and the practitioner, you can ask Google My Business to merge the two and it will combine the ranking strength of both. It will also give you one listing with more reviews (if each individual listing had reviews on it). The only scenario where I don’t advise combining the two is if your two listings both rank together and are monopolizing two of the three spots in the 3-pack. This is extremely rare.

Multi-practitioner listings

If the business has multiple practitioners, you are not able to get these listings removed or merged provided the practitioner still works there. While I don’t generally suggest creating listings for practitioners, they often exist already, leaving people to wonder what to do with them to keep them from competing with the listing for the practice.

A good strategy is to work on having multiple listings rank if you have practitioners that specialize in different things. Let’s say you have a chiropractor who also has a massage therapist at his office. The massage therapist’s listing could link to a page on the site that ranks highly for “massage therapy” and the chiropractor could link to the page that ranks highest organically for chiropractic terms. This is a great way to make the pages more visible instead of competing.

Another example would be a law firm. You could have the main listing for the law firm optimized for things like “law firm,” then have one lawyer who specializes in personal injury law and another lawyer who specializes in criminal law. This would allow you to take advantage of the organic ranking for several different keywords.

Keep in mind that if your goal is to have three of your listings all rank for the exact same keyword on Google, thus monopolizing the entire 3-pack, this is an unrealistic strategy. Google has filters that keep the same website from appearing too many times in the results and unless you’re in a really niche industry or market, it’s almost impossible to accomplish this.

Practitioners who no longer work there

It’s common to find listings for practitioners who no longer work for your business but did at some point. If you run across a listing for a former practitioner, you’ll want to contact Google My Business and ask them to mark the listing as moved to your practice listing. It’s extremely important that you get them to move it to your office listing, not the business the practitioner now works for (if they have been employed elsewhere). Here is a good case study that shows you why.

If the practitioner listing is verified, things can get tricky since Google My Business won’t be able to move it until it’s unverified. If the listing is verified by the practitioner and they refuse to give you access or remove it, the second-best thing would be to get them to update the listing to have their current employer’s information on it. This isn’t ideal and should be a last resort.

Listings for employees (not public-facing)

If you find a listing for a non-public-facing employee, it shouldn’t exist on Maps. For example: an office manager of a law firm, a paralegal, a hygienist, or a nurse. You can get the listing removed:

  • Pull up the listing on Maps
  • Press “Suggest an edit”
  • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed..” to Yes
  • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit.

Listings for deceased practitioners

This is always a terrible scenario to have to deal with, but I’ve run into lots of cases where people don’t know how to get rid of listings for deceased practitioners. The solution is similar to what you would do for someone who has left the practice, except you want to add an additional step. Since the listings are often verified and people usually don’t have access to the deceased person’s Google account, you want to make sure you tell Google My Business support that the person is deceased and include a link to their obituary online so the support worker can confirm you’re telling the truth. I strongly recommend using either Facebook or Twitter to do this, since you can easily include the link (it’s much harder to do on a phone call).

Creating practitioner listings

If you’re creating a practitioner listing from scratch, you might run into issues if you’re trying to do it from the Google My Business dashboard and you already have a verified listing for the practice. The error you would get is shown below.

There are two ways around this:

  1. Create the listing via Google Maps. Do this by searching the address and then clicking “Add a missing place.” Do not include the firm/practice name in the title of the listing or your edit most likely won’t go through, since it will be too similar to the listing that already exists for the practice. Once you get an email from Google Maps stating the listing has been successfully added, you will be able to claim it via GMB.
  2. Contact GMB support and ask them for help.

We hope you enjoyed this excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO! The full 160+-page guide is available for purchase and download via LocalU below.

Get the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 1 year ago from tracking.feedpress.it

How to benefit from Amazon’s values

In the last decade, retail has evolved at a tremendous pace – ecommerce broke down physical borders, orders are delivered at speeds that narrow the virtual to reality gap, and intuitive communications take second-guessing out of shopping. The enabler of these progressions is technology, and arguably, no retailer has embraced it with as much success as Amazon. While many retailers bemoan the sales that Amazon have ‘stolen’ under their feet, shouldn’t we look at this as an opportunity to grow?

Let’s talk about what retailers may love or hate about Amazon. For one, it has shown that getting shipping and fulfillment just right is rewarding, and that investing in the process helps you achieve economies of scale. Amazon’s laser focus on customers is nothing short of ground-breaking; it recently scored a hat-trick for winning at customer service. Ironically, the things that Amazon does so well are what retailers in general strive for – the point of difference perhaps, is the distance that it’s willing to go. Here’s five of Amazon’s values that reflect the way they do business:

“Customer obsession”

They certainly walk the talk at Amazon when it comes to serving their customers; more than tripling its marketing spend since 2012 to US$7.23 billion in 2016. In ‘The Delivery Advantage’ e-book, we featured Amazon’s successful Harry Potter launches, where its commitment to pre-launch deliveries delighted the series’ legion of fans.

“Invent and simplify”

A question that’s been raised a number of times is whether Amazon is focused on retail or logistics – due to the company’s reinvention of the supply chain process. Its investment into fulfillment centres, trucks and trailers, Amazon Flex delivery partners, and acquisition of French parcel service Colis Privé, seems to suggest the latter.

“Learn and be curious”

Technology has made learning so much easier; and Amazon is spearheading this with machine learning. What makes Amazon stand out is its approach to failure as part of the learning process. Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos once said, “Failure comes part and parcel with invention. It’s not optional.”

“Frugality”

Although failure costs Amazon “billions of dollars”, at its core, it’s frugal. It believes that it’s unnecessary to overspend on things that don’t directly benefit customers – so that means economy flights for all, including senior executives. You could argue that Amazon Prime was built on the idea of frugality, members feel like they’re saving money with premium free shipping.

“Deliver results”

It’s no coincidence that Amazon has placed this value at the end of its list. Without the ability to deliver results, the company won’t be able to execute any of the above – rather, they would remain only as ideas. And what results they are: Amazon is the 3rd most valuable brand in the world, just behind Google and Apple, with its brand monetary value rising by 54% to $106.4 million last year.

As a shipping technology partner for over 60,000 merchants and retailers, our team at Temando is aware that Amazon has really thrown down the gauntlet on what shoppers expect from their shopping experiences – be it with products or service. Here, we suggest practical shipping tactics based on the five Amazon principles above to show merchants that these values can be applied to anything you do:

  1. Customer obsession: Nothing dampens online shopping more than concluding with a poor shipping experience. Why not bring customers along the journey by offering relevant shipping options at checkout, complete with dynamic pricing (so there’s no nasty surprises), providing the option to easily track deliveries and making a self-service returns portal available?
  2. Invent and simplify: Shipping and fulfillment can be a manual, time-consuming task – but does it really need to be? You’d be surprised at how you would be able to increase customer satisfaction when you’re effective at processing orders quicker. Shipping technologies such as ours can streamline how you pick, pack and dispatch orders, and which carriers match the customer’s chosen delivery option.
  3. Learn and be curious: Shipping is a competitive advantage, so use it to improve customer relationships. Be receptive to customer feedback, and study your data to keep your shipping options relevant. Keep your eyes open for new and popular types of shipping options, such as same-day or hyperlocal (1-3 hours), and make sure you’re set up to easily integrate relevant carriers as you grow.
  4. Frugality: Many merchants think of shipping as a loss leader due to the traditionally high cost associated to its execution. However, by implementing shipping technology to support carrier selection, you’re saving money in the long run and will consistently get orders out to your customers quicker – and for less.
  5. Deliver results: Last but not least, all the shipping improvements that you make must result in better performance for your company, such as uptick in sales and/or reputation. By accelerating the shipping and fulfillment process, not only will you create better shopping experiences for your online customers, you’ll save on operational costs without sacrificing the growth of your business.

So while Amazon is a valid threat for many retailers, the company has also pushed the concept of customer-centricity and efficiency to another level – setting a new standard of retailing.

Like dotmailer, we at Temando are dedicated to helping retailers perform at their best in this evolving environment. Just as email marketing is an effective tactic to increase conversion, shipping technology is a valuable tool for merchants looking to be optimally efficient.

Explore how shipping improvements can work for you by downloading The Delivery Advantage e-book, or connect with me on LinkedIn – I’d love to hear from you.

Note: This article is an extension on an article I wrote in Internet Retailing that’s published on 7th February 2017.

The post How to benefit from Amazon’s values appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com