Have Your Agency’s Clients Considered a Local Product Kiosk? Google Has.

Posted by MiriamEllis

File this under fresh ideas for stagnant clients.

It’s 10:45 at night and I’m out of:

  • Tortillas
  • Avocados
  • Salsa

Maybe I just got off of work, like millions of other non-nine-to-fivers. Maybe I was running around with my family all day and didn’t get my errands done. Maybe I was feeling too sick to appear in a public grocery store wrapped in the ratty throw from my sofa.

And now, most of the local shops are closed for the night and I’m sitting here, taco-less and sad.

But what if it didn’t have to be that way? What if I could search Google and find a kiosk just a couple of blocks away that would vend me solutions, no matter what time of night or day?

Something old is becoming new again, just like home delivery. And for your agency’s local business clients, the opportunity could become an amazing competitive advantage.

What’s up with kiosks?

Something old

The automat was invented in Germany in the late 19th century and took off in the US in the decades following, with industry leader Horn & Hardart’s last New York location only closing in 1991. These famous kiosks fed thousands of Americans on a daily basis with on-demand servings of macaroni, fish cakes, baked beans, and chicory coffee. The demise of the automat is largely blamed on the rise of the fast food industry, with Burger Kings even opening doors at former automat locations.

Something new

A couple of weeks ago, I was watching an episode of my favorite local SEO news roundup in which Ignitor Digital’s Carrie Hill mentioned a meat vending kiosk. I was immediately intrigued and wanted to know more about this. What I learned sparked my imagination on behalf of local businesses which are always benefitted by at least considering fresh ideas, even if those ideas are actually just taking a page from history and editing it a bit.

Something inspirational

What I learned from my research is that the Applestone Meat Company is distinguishing itself from the competition by offering a 24/7 butcher shop via two vending installations in the state of New York. They also have a drive-up service window from 11am–6pm, but for the countless potential customers who are at work or elsewhere during so-called “normal business hours,” the meat kiosks are ever-ready to serve.

CEO Joshua Applestone says he was inspired by the memory of Horn & Hardart and he must be one smart local business owner to have taken this bold plunge. The company has already earned some pretty awesome unstructured citations from the likes of Bloomberg with this product marketing strategy and they’re planning to open ten more kiosks in the near future.

But Applestone isn’t alone. A kiosk can technically just be a fancy vending machine. Check out Chicago startup Farmer’s Fridge. They recently closed a $30 million Series C round led by one-time Google CEO Eric Schmidt’s Innovation Endeavors. Their 200+ midwestern units provide granola, Greek yogurt, pasta, wraps, beverages, and similar on-the-go fare, and they donate leftovers to local food pantries.

Americans have long been accustomed to ATM machines. DVD and game rental stations are old news to us. We are nowhere near Japan, with its sixty-billion-dollar-a-year, national vending machine density of one machine per 23 citizens, and its automated sales of everything from ramen to socks to umbrellas. Geography and economics don’t point to the need to go to such a level in the US, but where convenience is truly absent, opportunity may reside. What might that look like?

Use your imagination

My corner of the world is famous for its sourdough bread. There are hundreds of regional bakeries competing with one another for the crustiest, lightest, most indulgent loaf. But, if you don’t make it to the local stores by early afternoon, your favorite brand is likely to have sold out. And if you’re working the 47-hour American work week, or gigging California night and day but don’t want to live on fast food, you’d likely be quite grateful to have your access to artisan baguettes restored.

Just imagine every bread bakery around the SF Bay Area installing a kiosk outside its front door, and you can hear the satisfied after-hours crunching, can’t you?

Applestone is selling unprepared meat, Farmer’s Fridge is selling prepared meals, and almost anything people nosh could be a candidate for a kiosk, but why should on-demand products be limited to food? I let my imagination meander and jotted down a quick list of things people might buy at various off-hours, if a machine existed outside the storefront:

  • Books/magazines
  • Weather-appropriate basic apparel (sweatshirts, socks, t-shirts)
  • First aid supplies
  • Baby care supplies
  • Emergency electronics (chargers, batteries, flashlights)
  • Basic auto repair supplies (headlight bulbs, wipers, puncture kits)
  • Personal care products (bathroom tissue, toiletries)
  • Office supplies (printer ink, paper, envelopes, stamps)
  • Household goods (lightbulbs, laundry soap, pantry basics)
  • Pet supplies
  • Travel/camping/athletic supplies
  • Basic craft supplies, small games, gifts, etc.

What if customers who do their morning bike ride at 5 AM knew they could stop by your client’s kiosk to fix a punctured tire? What if night workers knew they could pick up a box of light bulbs or bandages or cat food on their way to their shift? Think of the convenience — in some instances even life-saving help — that could be provided to travelers on the road at all hours, members of your community who are housing-insecure, or whole neighborhoods that lack access to basic goods?

Not every local business has the right model for a kiosk, but once I started to think about it, I realized just how many of them could. I’m initially envisioning these machines being installed at the place of business, but, where the scenario is right, a company with the right type of inventory could certainly place additional kiosks in strategic locations around the communities they wish to serve.

Kiosk Local SEO

Clearly, kiosks can generate revenue, but what could they do for clients’ online presence? The guidelines for representing your business on Google already support the creation of local business listings for ATMs, video rental stations, and express mail dropboxes. But I went straight to Google with the Applewood example to ask if this emerging type of kiosk would be permitted to create listings. They were kind enough to reply:

Twitter DM from Google rep: kiosks are able to create listings, as per guidelines

The link in the Twitter DM reply just pointed to the general guidelines, and I can find no reference to the term “Food Kiosk listing” in them. It’s the first time I’ve ever heard this terminology. But, clearly this representative is naming food kiosks as a “thing.” Google, it seems, is already quite aware of this business model. And the proof of their support is in the Maps pudding:

My, my! Talk about having the ability to hyperlocalize your local search marketing to fit Google’s extreme emphasis on user-to-business proximity. Enough to make any local SEO agency see conversions and dollar signs for clients.

Tip #1: Helpline phone numbers

I’ve written about ATM SEO in the past for financial publications, and so I’ll add one important tip for creating eligible Google listings for kiosks: guidelines require that you have a helpline phone number for kiosk users. I would post this number both on the listings and on the units, themselves. Note that this will likely mean you have a shared phone number on multiple listings, which isn’t typically deemed ideal for local search marketing, but if kiosks become your model and you avoid any semblance of creating fake listings, Google can likely handle it.

Tip #2: Unique local landing pages for your kiosks

I can also see value in creating unique location landing pages on client websites for their kiosks, especially if they aren’t stationed at your physical location. These pages could give excellent driving and walking directions for each unit, explain how to use the machine, feature reviews and testimonials for that location, and perhaps highlight new inventory.

Tip #3: Capitalize on your social media

Social media will also be an excellent vehicle for letting particular neighborhoods know about client kiosks and engaging with communities to understand their sentiments. Seek abundant feedback about what is and isn’t working for customers and how inventory could better serve their needs. And, of course, be sure every client is monitoring reviews like a low-flying hawk.

Is there an appetite for kiosks?

Image credit: Ben Chun

I’m a longtime observer of rural local SEO. I’ve learned that being intentional in noticing small things can lead to big ideas, and almost any novel concept is worth floating to clients. The tiny, free book lending kiosks sometimes officially branded “Little Free Libraries” are everywhere in my county, have become a non-profit initiative, and are driving Etsy sales of cute wooden contraptions. Moreover, my region is dotted with unstaffed farm stands that operate on the honor system, trusting neighbors to pay for what they take. I’d say our household purchases about half of our produce from them.

Within recent recall, the milkman and the grocery delivery boy seemed as distant as the phonograph. Now, consumers are showing interest in having whole meal kitsentire wardrobes, and just about everything delivered. The point being: don’t discount anything that renders convenience; not the traveling salesman, not the automat.

The decision to experiment with a kiosk isn’t a simple one. There will be financial aspects, like how to access a unit that works for the inventory being sold. There will be security questions, as most businesses probably won’t feel comfortable operating on the honor system.

But if the question is whether there is an appetite for the right kiosk, selling the right goods, in the right place, I’ll close today with a look at these provocative, illuminating reviews from just one location of Farmer’s Fridge:

Screenshot: Multiple positive five-star Yelp reviews praising existing kiosks

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Reblogged 2 weeks ago from tracking.feedpress.it

SEO Affiliate Programs That Have Recurring Commissions

Today, I’m going to show you 15 of the top SEO affiliate programs. If you have an audience or are building one in the SEO and digital marketing space, these are proven programs that will help grow your passive income.  Here they are, broken down by types for your convenience.        Services OutreachMama – Yep, shameless … Continue reading “SEO Affiliate Programs That Have Recurring Commissions”
The post SEO Affiliate Programs That Have Recurring Commissions appeared first on OutreachMama.

Reblogged 3 months ago from www.outreachmama.com

Link Builders Have Ruined Everything (Again)

So this just happened… Gary Illyes of Google dropped a link building bomb on Twitter. It looks like he received an unsolicited link building email and went nuclear on the guy – making sure Google’s algorithm considers his list of 700 sites worthless (allegedly). Have you ever received an unsolicited email like the one Gary … Continue reading “Link Builders Have Ruined Everything (Again)”
The post Link Builders Have Ruined Everything (Again) appeared first on OutreachMama.

Reblogged 3 months ago from www.outreachmama.com

We have an announcement!

Last night, at the dotties 2018, we unveiled our new brand identity to a glittering room of clients, partners and employees. We’re thrilled to be able to share our rationale with you today.

What’s new?

We’ve brought our brand up to speed with a new name and look.  From 16th January 2019, we’ll be known as dotdigital. This is not a drastic shift in direction, but to us it signifies our strong commitment to the future of our business and the products we offer our customers.

We’re also changing the name of our platform to Engagement Cloud. In the 20 years we’ve been empowering you, our technology has evolved to meet the ever-advancing needs of your customers. It was becoming clear we needed a name that was more accurate to how you’re using the platform today. Engagement Cloud encompasses all of the same top-notch technology, intelligence and service you rely on to give your customers truly memorable experiences.

 

What inspired us?

You did! Since 1999, we’ve been evolving our platform to empower your customer engagement. We’ve seen the rise in consumer expectation – and we’ve watched our customers blaze a trail of excellence with data-driven marketing automation. We know that, today, email stands as one component of a much bigger, holistic engagement strategy.

We’ve been always been forward-facing, and for us the future brings further evolution, inspiration and empowerment. Our new brand identity is part of this vision.

 

Want to find out more?

Take a closer look into the future of dotdigital »

The post We have an announcement! appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Have you taken a look at our help center?

A bit about me

My name’s Jake and I’m a technical writer here at dotmailer.

Three months ago I joined what is now known as the ‘Technical Writing team’. You probably already know Neal, our senior technical writer, as he’s written most of the content in both the knowledge base and the developer hub so far!

My background is in languages. Although I’ve always been a writer and love to write, I decided that I wanted to learn a language other than English. I studied Applied Languages at Portsmouth University where I learned French and Spanish (and some Arabic). Since leaving University, I’ve used my knowledge of languages and the translation process to write for international audiences and make my writing easier to translate.

What do technical writers do?

Our goal as technical writers is to make it easier for you to find the answers to your questions. Let’s face it, you don’t want to be spending all your time looking for answers…

Essentially, we’re the gatherers of knowledge. We take the technical and make it accessible. We gather knowledge about new features and tasks that you might want to do, and we store all of this knowledge on our help center.

But we don’t just work alone in a cold, empty room; we work closely with a variety of teams at dotmailer, including our Support team who let us know which topics our users need help with and the reasons why.

Here’s a recent example of how we worked together with Support to improve the knowledge base:

We discovered that some users were asking how to send unique links to their contacts so that those contacts could download a PDF that was unique to them.

We decided that this information should be in an article on our help center. So, we made the topic more general (because you might want the link to go to an image or an Excel spreadsheet), then we added it to the knowledge base.

What’s in the help center?

1. Knowledge base

Our knowledge base is a full of living, breathing articles; we review them, update them and create new ones all the time.  If anyone ever thinks that platform users – like you – could benefit from some extra information, we put it in there. It’s a real oasis where you can find anything and everything about dotmailer. And, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, you can reach out to Support who will help with your particular question and let us know about it so that it’s in the knowledge base for next time!

2. Community

Our community section is a forum where you can ask questions or submit feature requests. Our friendly teams are on hand to answer any questions and check your feature requests.

3. Training videos

Our training videos are a great resource for those who are visual or audio learners. Our Training team has put together a collection of videos that aims to show you around the platform and give you a comprehensive idea of what you can accomplish.

4. Status

Our status section of the help center shows you the status of our system in each region. This section also lets you know when any scheduled or unscheduled updates have either occurred or are occurring.

In the top-right of this section, you can subscribe to email and SMS notifications so you’re always up to date with the latest status information.

5. Developer

Our developer hub is the knowledge base for developers. The developer hub describes how to use our API, including the following information:

  • Setup instructions
  • Endpoint descriptions for our REST and SOAP APIs
  • Error responses

 

Now you know a bit more about what we do and why we do it, why not take a look at our help center? You never know what you might find!

The post Have you taken a look at our help center? appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Deliverability: it doesn’t have to be the Pandora’s Box of email marketing

Email marketers should not be scared of Deliverability – it’s an essential part of email marketing that needs to be understood in order to drive best-of-breed sending practices.

What is Deliverability?

Deliverability is quite literally the ability for your email campaign to reach the inbox of the recipient. It is crucial not to confuse “Deliverability” with “Delivery”. According to Return Path, Delivery measures emails that have not received a hard or soft bounce – i.e. that haven not been rejected – but it does not measure where the email has landed. Deliverability on the other hand refers to the placement of your emails, be that in the inbox, the spam folder or a black hole in some galaxy far, far away.

How can I – as an e-marketer – maximise the deliverability of my email campaigns? Here are my top 5 tips:

  1. Get permission!

Make sure that the contacts you are emailing have given permission to receive emails from you and are expecting what you send. Getting consent from your contacts and setting the right expectations from the beginning helps build a strong sending reputation.

  1. Listen to your contacts

Target your engaged contacts; this helps you to maintain a healthy sender reputation which helps maximise your delivery to the email client (i.e. Hotmail) and placement in the inbox. The contacts that are continually engaging are showing you that they want to hear from you. Be strategic when emailing your un-engaged contacts; it is recommended not to email subscribers that have not historically engaged with your brand. This depends on your recipients – when does it make sense to remove them? Different product/service/email lifecycles will dictate different engagement strategies. As said in tip #1, this is a conversation. If the recipient isn’t interested in continuing, it’s time to change what you are saying to them. At this point, create a strategy that will target unengaged recipients with the purpose of wining them back. If they don’t respond to your “win-back” strategy, stop emailing them. Continually emailing unengaged subscribers weakens your sender reputation, causing lower inbox placement and response rates.

  1. Maintain your list hygiene

This will help you with targeting content to specific subscribers. Ensure that you are utilising the folder system within your account in order to manage address books. This will help you identify contacts and organise them in a way that best fits your sending strategy.

  1. Segment based on suitability and email behaviour

Look at contact interactions such as opens, clicks and conversions. Remember, a conversion does not necessarily mean a purchase, but rather a positive action in response to a call-to-action. This will give you more visibility of your contacts, helping you to target and engage with them further.

  1. Use in-built deliverability tools

Use the dotmailer-provided tools to help you maintain a strong reputation. Run your contacts against the Global Suppression list: this will help remove any hard bouncers/known unknown users (recipients that don’t exist). This tool is in place to help maintain your sender reputation.

As a last note, it is worth mentioning that the Email Marketing Industry – in terms of regulation – is becoming very focused on anti-abuse. With the GDPR coming in to effect in 2018, it is essential that email marketers enforce best sending practices. Conforming to these practices doesn’t just help with compliance, but it also protects your business interests. From a deliverability perspective, reaching your customers’ inboxes is a pre-requisite of driving ROI through the email channel.

Get a free copy of our deliverability myths guide, written by our Chief Privacy Officer.

The post Deliverability: it doesn’t have to be the Pandora’s Box of email marketing appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

The Votes Have Been Counted and the Winner is…

It would be hubris to think that these results are solely down to the email programs of the different parties but email surely played its part.

At the end of the day, political parties sell personalities. They talk about policies but those only matter if the voters have faith in the politicians who turn those policies into law. In other words, it is all about relationships. As we all know, email is the best channel for building relationships and the channel through which consumers want to build and maintain relationships with brands.

Both Labour and the Liberal Democrats did a better job of building these relationships. First, they sent more emails. It is always a fine balance of sending enough and sending too many but clearly the three or four emails sent by the Conservatives did not do the job. Similarly, the emails from Labour and the Liberal Democrats were a good mix of putting forth their policies and partisan campaigning with messages designed to motivate their supporters to get out and vote on the day.

Where all of the parties fell down was in nurturing undecided voters. They all assumed that people signing up to receive their emails were die-hard supporters. There was no attempt made to identify where we were on our journey to supporting their party. This caused issues right from the start. In many cases, we thought we were signing up to receive emails and we found ourselves on pages that talked about “membership,” “accounts” and “public profiles”. Instead, they should have asked to get to know us better with questions like:

  • What is your relationship with the party?
  • What issues interest you?
  • Are you planning to vote?

Email is the best marketing tool for building relationships and relationships are built on two-way communications. The political parties that actually bothered to send emails made little to no effort to build relationships with their email programs. Labour and the Liberal Democrats were both in the little effort camp and that effort paid off on polling day.

The post The Votes Have Been Counted and the Winner is… appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

What do the 5 senses and email marketing have in common?

In reality, best practice can be as logical as common sense, and aligning to the five senses is exactly what marketers should be doing to get the best from the email channel.

This blog aims to give you a checklist on how to approach best practice, putting your customers at the heart of everything you do.

Hear…

…what your readers want!

Everyone loves a good listener and, as a brand, listening will help you establish and build trust with your customers. From asking them upfront to self-select preferences to inviting and listening to regular feedback, showing that you hear and adapt to what they are saying to and about you will boost engagement and long-term customer loyalty.

Speak…

to them like you would to your friends or associates. Your customers are people first and foremost and they’re going to prefer spending time with people they like (hopefully you!), rather than brands who see them purely as a sales opportunity. Your tone of voice and messaging is your opportunity to inform, engage and sell, so use your words wisely!

See…

…what they’re doing. Opens, clicks and heat maps are a great way to see what’s catching your customers’ eyes. For example, run a test to see what creatives and formats work for your consumers.

Don’t just stop there either: if you’re able to, see what their path to purchase is. Where are they going next? How long are they on site? Use this to build up a portfolio of your segments and target them with content to match.

(Keep in) touch…

… at the right frequency. Too many emails and your customers might feel bombarded, your core brand message is lost, and customers stop paying attention. Too few, and your customers will forget who you are and you risk them going to your competitors. Listening to your customers, and seeing what they’re doing, will guide you towards getting the touchpoints right.

Taste…

… and learn (or rather: test and learn!) Big brand strategies can be realized through incremental test and learn strategies. Improving your customer communications little by little will not only produce more engaging emails, but you’ll get a taste for your different customer groups and how they move through the lifecycle. This way can be proactive in anticipating their needs, rather than reacting when it’s too late.

Ultimately, keep it simple and let your customers guide you to what the best practice is for you. We’ve tons of free resources to get your email marketing best-practice ready.

The post What do the 5 senses and email marketing have in common? appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

As a local business, you have to own your own back yard

The grass may seem greener in neighboring markets, but columnist Greg Gifford explains that in order to compete there via local SEO, you need to have your own yard in order first.

The post As a local business, you have to own your own back yard appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Darryl, the man behind dotmailer’s Custom Technical Solutions team

Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

I first got to know dotmailer when the company was just a bunch of young enthusiastic web developers called Ellipsis Media back in 1999. I was introduced by one of my suppliers and we decided to bring them on board to build a recruitment website for one of our clients. That client was Amnesty International and the job role was Secretary General. Not bad for a Croydon company whose biggest client before that was Scobles the plumber’s merchants. So, I was probably dotmailer’s first ever corporate client! After that, I used dotmailer at each company I worked for and then one day they approached a colleague and me and asked us if we wanted to work for them. That was 2013.  We grabbed the opportunity with both hands and haven’t looked back since.

Tell us a bit about your role

I’m the Global Head of Technical Solutions which actually gives me responsibility for 2 teams. First, Custom Technical Solutions (CTS), who build bespoke applications and tools for customers that allow them to integrate more closely with dotmailer and make life easier. Second, Technical Pre-sales, which spans our 3 territories (EMEA, US and APAC) and works with prospective and existing clients to figure out the best solution and fit within dotmailer.

What accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I would say so far it has to be helping to turn the CTS team from just 2 people into a group of 7 highly skilled and dedicated men and women who have become an intrinsic and valued part of the dotmailer organization. Also I really enjoy being part of the Senior Technical Management team. Here we have the ability to influence the direction and structure of the platform on a daily basis.

Meet Darryl Clark – the cheese and peanut butter sandwich lover

Can you speak a bit about your background and that of your team? What experience and expertise is required to join this team?

My background is quite diverse from a stint in the Army, through design college, web development, business analysis to heading up my current teams. I would say the most valuable skill that I have is being highly analytical. I love nothing more than listening to a client’s requirements and digging deep to work out how we can answer these if not exceed them.

As a team, we love nothing more than brainstorming our ideas. Every member has a valid input and we listen. Everyone has the opportunity to influence what we do and our motto is “there is no such thing as a stupid question.”

To work in my teams you have to be analytical but open minded to the fact that other people may have a better answer than you. Embrace other people’s input and use it to give our clients the best possible solution. We are hugely detail conscious, but have to be acutely aware that we need to tailor what we say to our audience so being able to talk to anyone at any level is hugely valuable.

How much of the dotmailer platform is easily customizable and when does it cross over into something that requires your team’s expertise? How much time is spent on these custom solutions one-time or ongoing?

I’ll let you in on a little secret here. We don’t actually do anything that our customers can’t do with dotmailer given the right knowledge and resources. This is because we build all of our solutions using the dotmailer public API. The API has hundreds of methods in both SOAP and REST versions, which allows you to do a huge amount with the dotmailer platform. We do have a vast amount of experience and knowledge in the team so we may well be able to build a solution quicker than our customers. We are more than happy to help them and their development teams build a solution using us on a consultancy basis to lessen the steepness of the learning curve.

Our aim when building a solution for a customer is that it runs silently in the background and does what it should without any fuss.

What are your plans for the Custom Tech Solutions team going forward?

The great thing about Custom Technical Solutions is you never know what is around the corner as our customers have very diverse needs. What we are concentrating on at the moment is refining our processes to ensure that they are as streamlined as possible and allow us to give as much information to the customer as we can. We are also always looking at the technology and coding approaches that we use to make sure that we build the most innovative and robust solutions.

We are also looking at our external marketing and sharing our knowledge through blogs so keep an eye on the website for our insights.

What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

Most questions seem to revolve around reassurance such as “Have you done this before?”, “How safe is my data?”, “What about security?”, “Can you talk to my developers?”, “Do I need to do anything?”.  In most instances, we are the ones asking the questions as we need to find out information as soon as possible so that we can analyse it to ensure that we have the right detail to provide the right solution.

Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

We talk a lot about working with best of breed so for example a customer can use our Channel Extensions in automation programs to fire out an SMS to a contact using their existing provider. We don’t force customers down one route, we like to let them decide for themselves.

Also, I really like to emphasize the fact that there is always more than one way to do something within the dotmailer platform. This means we can usually find a way to do something that works for a client within the platform. If not, then we call in CTS to work out if there is a way that we can build something that will — whether this is automating uploads for a small client or mass sending from thousands of child accounts for an enterprise level one.

What do you see as the future of marketing automation technology?  Will one size ever fit all? Or more customization going forward?

The 64 million dollar question. One size will never fit all. Companies and their systems are too organic for that. There isn’t one car that suits every driver or one racquet that suits every sport. Working with a top drawer partner network and building our system to be as open as possible from an integration perspective means that our customers can make dotmailer mold to their business and not the other way round…and adding to that the fact that we are building lots of features in the platform that will blow your socks off.

Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m a dyed in the wool Gooner (aka Arsenal Football Club fan) thanks to my Grandfather leading me down the right path as a child. If you are still reading this after that bombshell, then food-wise I pretty much like everything apart from coriander which as far as I’m concerned is the Devils own spawn. I don’t really have a favorite band, but am partial to a bit of Level 42 and Kings of Leon and you will also find me listening to 90s drum and bass and proper old school hip hop. My favorite holiday destination is any decent villa that I can relax in and spend time with my family and I went to Paris recently and loved that. Guilty pleasure – well that probably has to be confessing to liking Coldplay or the fact that my favorite sandwich is peanut butter, cheese and salad cream. Go on try it, you’ll love it.

Want to meet more of the dotmailer team? Say hi to Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support, and Dan Morris, EVP for North America.

Reblogged 3 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com