Deliverability: it doesn’t have to be the Pandora’s Box of email marketing

Email marketers should not be scared of Deliverability – it’s an essential part of email marketing that needs to be understood in order to drive best-of-breed sending practices.

What is Deliverability?

Deliverability is quite literally the ability for your email campaign to reach the inbox of the recipient. It is crucial not to confuse “Deliverability” with “Delivery”. According to Return Path, Delivery measures emails that have not received a hard or soft bounce – i.e. that haven not been rejected – but it does not measure where the email has landed. Deliverability on the other hand refers to the placement of your emails, be that in the inbox, the spam folder or a black hole in some galaxy far, far away.

How can I – as an e-marketer – maximise the deliverability of my email campaigns? Here are my top 5 tips:

  1. Get permission!

Make sure that the contacts you are emailing have given permission to receive emails from you and are expecting what you send. Getting consent from your contacts and setting the right expectations from the beginning helps build a strong sending reputation.

  1. Listen to your contacts

Target your engaged contacts; this helps you to maintain a healthy sender reputation which helps maximise your delivery to the email client (i.e. Hotmail) and placement in the inbox. The contacts that are continually engaging are showing you that they want to hear from you. Be strategic when emailing your un-engaged contacts; it is recommended not to email subscribers that have not historically engaged with your brand. This depends on your recipients – when does it make sense to remove them? Different product/service/email lifecycles will dictate different engagement strategies. As said in tip #1, this is a conversation. If the recipient isn’t interested in continuing, it’s time to change what you are saying to them. At this point, create a strategy that will target unengaged recipients with the purpose of wining them back. If they don’t respond to your “win-back” strategy, stop emailing them. Continually emailing unengaged subscribers weakens your sender reputation, causing lower inbox placement and response rates.

  1. Maintain your list hygiene

This will help you with targeting content to specific subscribers. Ensure that you are utilising the folder system within your account in order to manage address books. This will help you identify contacts and organise them in a way that best fits your sending strategy.

  1. Segment based on suitability and email behaviour

Look at contact interactions such as opens, clicks and conversions. Remember, a conversion does not necessarily mean a purchase, but rather a positive action in response to a call-to-action. This will give you more visibility of your contacts, helping you to target and engage with them further.

  1. Use in-built deliverability tools

Use the dotmailer-provided tools to help you maintain a strong reputation. Run your contacts against the Global Suppression list: this will help remove any hard bouncers/known unknown users (recipients that don’t exist). This tool is in place to help maintain your sender reputation.

As a last note, it is worth mentioning that the Email Marketing Industry – in terms of regulation – is becoming very focused on anti-abuse. With the GDPR coming in to effect in 2018, it is essential that email marketers enforce best sending practices. Conforming to these practices doesn’t just help with compliance, but it also protects your business interests. From a deliverability perspective, reaching your customers’ inboxes is a pre-requisite of driving ROI through the email channel.

Get a free copy of our deliverability myths guide, written by our Chief Privacy Officer.

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Reblogged 2 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Winning in customer moments: why email and lifecycle marketing go hand in hand

Today’s hyper-connected consumers are creatures of habit: they journey through lifecycles on the premise of conformity and uniformity, yet they’re also impulsive. They want to do what everyone else is doing; and most of all, they don’t want to feel left out. Marketers can leverage these shared human instincts with the data they hold on their customers; not necessarily in a big brother-esque ‘freaky’ kind of way, but rather in a soft approach that taps into our human nature. Lifecycle marketing messages should be emotive, precisely because their intention is to encourage an emotional response.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term ‘lifecycle marketing’, Smart Insights defines it nicely as a “Contact strategy to prioritise and integrate the full range of marketing communications and experiences to support customers on their path to purchase.” And we know that adding an emotive and personalized layer to the messaging that’s sent to customers during their journey can really pack a punch.

We have all experienced this personal touch from an email marketing perspective – that birthday email from ASK Italian that made me book a table, for instance; the one-year anniversary email of my India trip which made me book a trip to Russia with the same company! Many brands are effectively using their customer data to drive brand loyalty and ROI. Nevertheless, there was one particular example I wanted to share because I consider it to be an exemplar of using email to enhance your lifecycle marketing.

In 2013, Mothercare had 280,000 names in their database, but now they have around 11 million in total – 3 million of which are active. According to Marketing Director Gary Kibble, the “richness” is in understanding the value of customers. For instance, a pre-natal customer is worth three times as much as a customer that shops after birth. This level of understanding comes from looking specifically at what, when and why customers purchase. Subsequently, Mothercare has built a “rich, visual picture” of customers based on information on the stage of their pregnancy.

Leveraging the above, Mothercare has created no less than 200 triggered emails to inform parents about what’s happening in their pregnancy, what they need to be thinking about, and what/when/why they need to purchase. Knowing the due-date means that this close, emotional relationship can continue after the baby is born and, importantly, remain relevant to the customer. This ties closely to the idea that humans (generally) conform, are uniform, and are impulsive. Here’s a typical example:

“Hmm, yeah, we need a baby rocking chair. It would be weird if we didn’t have a rocking chair, right? I mean, most people probably get one.

“Oooh, I really like that one; shall we buy that one?”  

In conclusion, Mothercare has effectively absorbed their customers’ insight, matched it with their product knowledge and, as a result, produced a great relationship with customers. Any retailer can digitally enhance their email marketing lifecycle with the end goal of driving customer value and increasing ROI. Core belief: the devil is in the data!

If you’d like to delve deeper into the world of lifecycle marketing, get a free copy of our guide that outlines why email is your lifeline when making customers for life.

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Reblogged 3 weeks ago from blog.dotmailer.com

5 ecommerce automation programs that make email an essential marketing channel for retailers

Customer relationships are like any relationship – you need to put in the effort to make them work.  After the initial excitement of meeting, it’s important to keep letting them know you care and are there for them.

This is tricky enough in a 1 to 1 relationship.  When you, a retailer, have hundreds, thousands or possibly even millions of relationships to maintain, it’s impossible to do so manually, so use the tools available to you to take out the heavy lifting without letting engagement suffer.

Luckily, using customer data – their actions or inaction – you can send messages to your base tailored to where they are in their relationship with you, not where you are in your marketing plan.

Event triggered marketing and automation is highly effective way of keeping the love alive, while saving you time and money that you can reinvest in moving your business forward.

Here are 5 simple programs that will help your relationship tick over…

Thank you for subscribing

The first email any retailer should send their customers is, very simply, a thank you.

We’ve all seen stories and statistics on inbox overcrowding, so, if a customer has given you their email address you should recognize this is a privilege and thank them at the point of sign up.

You can extend this ‘thank you’ and send a short, automated welcome series, and use this opportunity to get to know each other better.  Retailers can use this opportunity to educate your new subscriber on the full range of your products, and in turn, invite your customer to provide further data and preferences on your site.

Automated Thank you or Welcome programs, when used effectively, help build brand engagement, trust and set expectations for a positive buyer seller relationship from the start.

Abandon cart

The people over at the Baymard Institute have compiled a survey review of the various reports available on online shopping behavior, and have concluded the average number of people abandoning their shopping cart is just over 69%.  This is a huge amount of potential lost revenue.

Reasons for customers abandoning vary.  They need either more time, more money, or more option to compare so make sure to send a timely reminder that you’re still there when they’re ready to purchase.

Depending on your product, the consideration cycle will range from 30 minutes to 30 days.  Use the insight you have available to target customers with an automated reminder message before they’re enticed away by your competitors. Around 63% of baskets are recoverable – find out more here.

New Information

If, like most retailers, you want optimum brand engagement through having your customers to engage with you across several online avenues then, there should be channel specific benefits to them doing so.

The same is true with email, and retailers can effectively make their beloved customers feel they are getting value from subscribing by automating worthwhile information for them.

Providing that you can get the product feeds into your email platform, you can send customers notifications on new stock, price drops or reviews to keep them engaged during the sale cycle.  Keeping them up to date on what matters most to them is a great way to show you that you really care.

It’s your birthday

As with any good relationship you’re trying to nurture, anniversaries are important.

You can choose what anniversary you want to acknowledge based on what makes sense for your business – sign up date, purchase date (high ticket items),or a customer’s actual birthday.  Using the date provided you can send a short personalized message to commemorate the date and given them a voucher, upgrade or other incentive you see fit.

This personalized touch of surprise and delight creates a deeper relationship and is a quick win to keeping your customers happy.

We miss you

If it looks like your customer is losing interest, you don’t have to let them walk away.

Convincing them to stay is easier when they’re still with you than once they’ve unsubscribed.  If a loyal customer has stopped buying from you then treat this like anyone else you’re trying to win over.  Make the effort to get in touch, help them feel special, remind them why you’re good for them, and if needs be, maybe give them a little incentive to come back to you.

Done well, the act of recognizing the relationship isn’t what it was will reignite the feeling that were once there, and if not, then, you tried and you know it’s over.

 

The Golden rule is that if you’ve got the data, you can automate the message. Start simple and scale, it’ll make all the difference to your relationships.

The post 5 ecommerce automation programs that make email an essential marketing channel for retailers appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Faster, smarter email marketing for APAC customers

Another exciting landmark in dotmailer’s APAC expansion sees the launch of our brand-new data centre in Australia. As well as enhancing performance, the new instance of the platform also offers enhanced security and privacy, thanks to the combination of a physical data centre in Sydney and the utilisation of Microsoft Azure’s cloud technologies for security and encryption.

The upgrade to our infrastructure means we’re now able to store our customers’ data within the region, fully complying with the 13 Australian Privacy Principles (APP).

We opened our first Australian office in 2015 and the warm reception of our software led to the opening of a second office in Melbourne in 2016. Globally, there are around 80,000 marketers in 150 countries using the dotmailer platform – so partnering with leading technologies like Microsoft Azure truly underpins our growing presence.

“dotmailer’s customers consist of marketers and businesses that want an intuitive yet sophisticated online tool that helps them engage with their customers more effectively. By launching in Australia, we can offer customers a secure and faster service in the APAC region,” said Steve Shaw, Chief Technology Officer for dotmailer.

You can find out more about dotmailer’s infrastructure and the seriousness we place on privacy via our Trust Centre.

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Reblogged 2 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Is this the end of offer-led email marketing?

In the Direct Marketing Association’s most recent Consumer Email Tracker report, more than half of consumers said the top reason for joining a brand’s mailing list is to receive money off and %-off deals.

But conversely (and perhaps worryingly), marketers are reporting a somewhat different story on the popularity of email content featuring offers. Just 27% of respondents in the DMA’s 2017 Marketer Email Tracker found discount-led emails to be delivering the goods.

Have offers really become meaningless? Likely not. Rather, the offers being sent are irrelevant and this has led to a waning tolerance towards emails of this nature. In my eyes, there are two possible solutions: begin using behavioral and purchase data to tailor offers to individuals or take your email marketing in an editorial direction. In fact, a combination of the two is geared up to be a winning formula.

In this post, I’m going to give you five content-led emails you can send to contacts which don’t include the word sale (or discount, offer or deal, to that end).

UGC-focused campaigns

Your customers are your business. And the ones who love your brand make the perfect advocates (and content creators) if you’ve got the right structure in place. Emails centered on top reviews or even stories written by customers on their experiences with your brand are worth their weight in gold. Let’s take the travel industry for instance: Instagram is a prime channel for rich UGC, as are blogging platforms where holidaymakers have a penchant for sharing their special moments.

Helpful advice and how-to guides

If you’re keen for your brand to own the reputation as the leader in its field, you’ll want to position your business as the true expert. One sure-fire way to demonstrate knowledge in a specific area or areas is to produce helpful content that educates consumers on how to get the most from your products and services. For example, DIY stores are well placed to create how-to guides on everything from decorating to gardening, and then emailing them to those who’ve purchased or displayed interest in the product or range.

Competitions

A free competition with the promise of an attractive prize is geared up to go down a storm. Not only will it appeal to existing subscribers, but those who enjoy sharing the good stuff are likely to forward the email to their family and friends (generating even more leads and engagements … what’s not to like?).

Cross-channel promotion campaigns

Email is just one of your marketing channels — and hopefully a strong one at that. So why not use it to encourage sign-up on all of your other channels and platforms? Send an email to subscribers to let them know about your presence on social media, get them to download your app if you have one, and direct them towards your blog for your brand’s editorial gems.

Re-engagement campaigns

If all else fails? Attempt to re-engage dissatisfied subscribers by acknowledging that the relationship’s gone south and you’re keen to rekindle the love. For instance, you could test a self-deprecating message along with a preference center that gives contacts the option to tailor the volume of emails and the content that lands in their inboxes. Irrelevant content is usually the root cause of a subscriber’s dwindling enthusiasm — so collect up-to-date information on your contacts and use it smartly to hook them back in.

Want some more ideas and real-life examples? Get your hands on a free copy of dotmailer’s ‘5 winning emails that don’t include the word sale’ cheatsheet.

The post Is this the end of offer-led email marketing? appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 3 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Humanise your email marketing content and bring customers closer to your brand

Content is one of the most important aspects of an email’s infrastructure. It’s the personality of the email that either grasps the recipient or puts them off. A subscriber’s impression of content can sometimes be instantaneous, so it’s essential to get it spot on from the start.

In The Future of email marketing – 2017 edition, there were a few thought-provoking points on content that really made me reflect on the importance of copy in an email. The below point stood out for me the most:

Email will (and should) have a more conversational voice and tone.

Aweber quoted Maya Angelou, the famed American poet: “people don’t always remember what you say … but they always remember how you made them feel”. We should apply this to an email marketing context: what a brand says can be compelling, but how it’s said leaves the lasting impression (and that’s what really matters).

Brands need to be plain-speaking, casual and not take themselves too seriously. Branding needs to be baked into every sentence. Writing content that oozes personality will help customers relate more to your business, and even feel a part of it. This is an essential goal of email marketing; to keep the core (business) and the periphery (customers) as entwined as possible. Because really, what would a business be without its customers?

According to Aweber, voice and tone are two separate objectives of content; the former is the “mission”, i.e. the message of the email; the latter is the delivery of said mission. This tends to be descriptive and should – in terms of best practice – be conveyed in an emotive way. The key is to humanise the message and make it specifically relatable to a human being’s sub-conscious. Do not view them as subscribers or even customers.

What does this look like in practice?

A great example is Naked Wines’ emails. According to Kunle Campbell, “they [Naked Wines] … relentlessly infuse dynamism into their business” and “their copywriting … is crisply written, with an easily identifiable tone of voice to go along with it”.

It’s worth noting that any business can do this. An email from a financial corporation might find it harder to send a relatable and emotional message than say, a charity or a pet shop. However, as long as you ask yourself the following questions –

  • What does the email mean?
  • What do we want the individual to feel?
  • What do we want the subscriber to do?

– you’ll be on track. Be creative and think outside the box.

 

 

Sources:

https://blog.aweber.com/email-marketing/how-to-develop-tone-of-voice-to-connect-with-your-email-audience.htm

http://www.emailmonday.com/email-marketing-future

https://2xecommerce.com/nakedwines-marketing/ (Kunle Campbell)

The post Humanise your email marketing content and bring customers closer to your brand appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 4 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

The email marketing metrics you should be measuring

Have you ever had to answer questions from your boss about an email that didn’t perform as expected? You might have wished you had some accurate measure to back you up. The fact is, unless they’re looking at the right metrics, they could be missing the point entirely.

No matter how you spin it, emails are really important. Marketers love them, and consumers want them. The DMA can tell you that, and they do every year. But how can we quantify this?

Understanding the measurable success of emails is one of the most important tools for an email marketer.

That sounds like an obvious statement, but 55% of marketers in 2016 said they couldn’t calculate the ROI of email.[1]

The first step towards equipping yourself to deal with probing questions from above is to define what success looks like to your business. It’s easy to get lost in the sea of reporting data you now have at your disposal, or bogged down with KPI’s, industry norms, and board expectations. Instead, you need to focus on what you want your email to do. Are you a seasonal retailer looking for website traffic, or are you a B2B company seeking a high open rate from an informative email? Purpose is crucial. All audiences are different; therefore, not all marketers should be tracking the same measure of success.

Imagine you are an online shoe retailer. Do you care about open rates? Maybe. Or maybe it’s been a while since pay day. Perhaps some contacts have just bought a pair of shoes and they aren’t going to want to hear about all the other choices they could have made. So how about looking at click-to-opens? If I’m ready to buy a pair of shoes, I’m probably an active browser. I’ll open the emails, click through to the website and pore over pages and pages of options to find what I like. The more you measure this behaviour, the better you can drive it; and the more likely it is that a contact is browsing your website when they finally decide to buy.

For a B2B marketer, interactions can be less frequent and fewer in number. These companies need to identify how valuable each interaction is so they can make the most out of every opportunity. Your boss might notice a downturn in the number of emails sent, but miss that the messaging has become much more targeted. Highly tailored emails drive better engagement, leading to more website sessions and longer average dwell times.

Communicating your intent should be enough to get them off your case, right?

Wrong. Well, for most senior managers anyway. More engagement may well lead to more sales, but you need to prove it. While terms like ‘lifetime loyalty’ and ‘engagement’ excite marketers, for most budget holders they’re just a distraction from their sole concern: revenue.

Calculating the revenue value of an email address isn’t rocket science.

You can take the total revenue generated from email campaigns and divide by the average size of the overall email list over a given period (say, a year or 6 months). You can also attribute back the less direct email conversions, such as online to offline journeys, which you should take care to do. When setting your testing plans, benchmarking reports, or KPI’s, make sure you build in some value analysis to fend off any stakeholders who are less savvy when it comes to marketing.

Not only can these measurements help your board to better understand email success as a value, they will also gives you conversion and email acquisition figures to aim for in the future, supporting the growth of your email strategy and ultimate ROI.

It’s crucially important to consider the full customer journey when measuring email success. You need to think about which metrics drive your desired behaviours. Unfortunately, there is no set rule here. However, as email marketers, you’re best placed to create your own.

Want to know more? Download our cheatsheet: Track it and smash it: 6 email marketing metrics you must measure.

[1] DMA Insight: Marketer email tracking study 2017

The post The email marketing metrics you should be measuring appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 4 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

What do the 5 senses and email marketing have in common?

In reality, best practice can be as logical as common sense, and aligning to the five senses is exactly what marketers should be doing to get the best from the email channel.

This blog aims to give you a checklist on how to approach best practice, putting your customers at the heart of everything you do.

Hear…

…what your readers want!

Everyone loves a good listener and, as a brand, listening will help you establish and build trust with your customers. From asking them upfront to self-select preferences to inviting and listening to regular feedback, showing that you hear and adapt to what they are saying to and about you will boost engagement and long-term customer loyalty.

Speak…

to them like you would to your friends or associates. Your customers are people first and foremost and they’re going to prefer spending time with people they like (hopefully you!), rather than brands who see them purely as a sales opportunity. Your tone of voice and messaging is your opportunity to inform, engage and sell, so use your words wisely!

See…

…what they’re doing. Opens, clicks and heat maps are a great way to see what’s catching your customers’ eyes. For example, run a test to see what creatives and formats work for your consumers.

Don’t just stop there either: if you’re able to, see what their path to purchase is. Where are they going next? How long are they on site? Use this to build up a portfolio of your segments and target them with content to match.

(Keep in) touch…

… at the right frequency. Too many emails and your customers might feel bombarded, your core brand message is lost, and customers stop paying attention. Too few, and your customers will forget who you are and you risk them going to your competitors. Listening to your customers, and seeing what they’re doing, will guide you towards getting the touchpoints right.

Taste…

… and learn (or rather: test and learn!) Big brand strategies can be realized through incremental test and learn strategies. Improving your customer communications little by little will not only produce more engaging emails, but you’ll get a taste for your different customer groups and how they move through the lifecycle. This way can be proactive in anticipating their needs, rather than reacting when it’s too late.

Ultimately, keep it simple and let your customers guide you to what the best practice is for you. We’ve tons of free resources to get your email marketing best-practice ready.

The post What do the 5 senses and email marketing have in common? appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 4 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Ecommerce email marketing – Best practices to triple your sales

Unlike the one-to-many communication model used across social media platforms, blogs and advertisements, ecommerce email marketing works on a simple, one-to-one basis. If you perfect your email campaigns, you’re almost guaranteed to boost sales, improve customer loyalty and build your ecommerce brand image within no time.

Whether it’s a monthly update, a welcome email or an upcoming sale notification, these tips will put your business ahead of the curve.

Keep it personal

Emails are a direct form of marketing communication, so you’ll want to keep your messages light and personal. And it all starts with the greeting. Sending out countless detached, irrelevant emails isn’t going to get you or your business very far; customers like to feel as though you’ve carefully crafted an email specifically for them.

Something as simple as adding the customer’s name in the greeting is a good start. Consumers would much rather open an email to read something like, “Good morning, Karen!” instead of a general mass greeting. With the right email marketing provider, a simple automated personalization tool can make this task easy.

Another way to keep your emails personal, yet professional, is to add dynamic content. Dynamic content is content that changes based on the preference or the demographics of your customers, which allows your business to target individual subscribers. Adding dynamic content to your emails could be as easy as switching the image that is displayed for your male subscribers versus your female subscribers.

Make it clear as to who you are

Once you’ve selected a personal greeting, let your customers know who you are. The more information you provide, the less likely your email will be tossed into the spam pile.

Every person wants to know the following three things when they receive an email:

  • Who is writing to me?
  • Why are they writing to me?
  • What to do they want me to do?

You want to make sure the “who” part is answered almost immediately upon opening, as this is the basis for legitimizing the rest of the email.

Grab their attention

Think about the subject line before shooting off an email with something generic. It should be engaging and interesting enough for the receiver to open the email. Remember, your email is competing against several other “unread” messages sitting in their inbox, so why should they open yours? The subject line is the first thing readers see – think of it as a first impression.

Keep it short and sweet

Keeping your emails concise is crucial. While you may be tempted to cram in as much information as possible, do refrain. Follow these three rules: make your email:

  • Exclusive – let your readers know they’ve received this email because they’re special. For example, let them know they are the “first to know” about your newest products or offer them an “exclusive discount.”
  • Urgent – try and make the proposition a limited-time offer.
  • Simple – don’t crowd the email with too many visuals or information. Stick to one or two calls-to-action and one or two key messages.

Remember: People want to know who you are, why you are contacting them, and what you want them to do, all within a few sentences or paragraphs.

Double and triple check everything you send out

Sending an email with broken links or out-of-date information sends the wrong message. Be sure to check your links and proofread your copy before it’s sent out.

In addition, redundant coding and an excessive use of links, text, and images are practices that should be avoided. If you’re unsure about your emails’ link or image-to-text ratio, try running your email through a spam checker before sending it out.

A top email marketing platform includes spam check and preview tools so your email not only appears at its best, but also reaches its intended audience. These checks also ensure everyone in your team (or appropriate stakeholders) can review before you hit send.

When done right, the direct and personalized nature of email marketing means you’re likely to see a boost in online sales. By following these tips, you’re setting yourself up for a successful marketing campaign.

The post Ecommerce email marketing – Best practices to triple your sales appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 7 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

A first look @ the UK Digital Marketing Association (DMA) Email Tracking Report 2017

Sometimes a bit of that déjà vu feeling can be a giggle, but when repetition is costing you time and money, it’s a little less amusing.

We’ve just been given first access to The UK Digital Marketing Association (DMA) Email Tracking Report 2017, sponsored by dotmailer. Awesome statistics, actionable insights, and a little bit like something we read this time last year.

The good news is that email is still firmly seated atop the throne as consumers’ preferred marketing channel. In fact, according to the report, email use is still on the rise, with the DMA likening the act of checking your inbox to a routine as subconscious as brushing your teeth in the morning. That’s the kind of healthy recurrence we like to hear about.

And the bad news?

Email marketing is in danger of losing its crown. And the culprit? It’s not new laws, or poor technology, or pesky Millennials whining and moaning and taking everything for granted…

It’s relevancy.

Back in yesteryear, our Client Services Director Skip Fidura wrote a blog post to accompany the recently published DMA Email Tracking Report 2015, detailing a call to action for the prioritization of relevant content in email marketing campaigns. 63% of the 2016 versions of our consumers had said: “Most of the marketing emails I receive include NO content or offers that are of interest to me.” Subject lines were generic, offers were universal, and content was characterless. We all took note; relevancy needed to be improved if email marketing was going to continue to top the charts.

So why are we now looking at a 5% rise in consumers failing to identify the relevancy of our campaigns? 68% now agree with the above statement, and 84% now find less than half of their emails ‘interesting or relevant’. And that’s if they even get to the campaign itself; the DMA Email Tracker Report 2017 reveals that only 6% of consumers opened and read all of their emails – 67% read fewer than half. This is hardly a surprising statistic, when you consider that most feel there’s nothing of worth to them inside.

Email marketers are losing their customers’ trust because they’re not able to prove that they know how to engage with them. When you don’t feel like somebody knows you, you’re not going to open up, invite them in for a cup of tea, give them the nice biscuits with chocolate on. And if you feel like someone else is making a better attempt to get to know you, you’re going to turn your attention to them. It’s that simple.

Is it that we just don’t like “simple”?

Why is it that we haven’t yet cracked relevancy in email marketing campaigns, when we’ve got the tools at our fingertips? We can track consumer behavior; we can segment our contact lists by gender, location, and shoe size (if appropriate) we can test subject lines, copy, images and layout at the click of a button, and all of this data can be fed into a campaign that reaches Mrs. Smith when she gets home at 7pm on a Monday and starts surfing for size six shoes.

We need to start effectively using the tools that are available to us.

What can you do before the year is out?

Ask if you are relevant – When we released last year’s results, one of our clients took some of the key metrics, built them into a survey and asked her recipients the same questions. It would be inappropriate to share what she found but it was interesting to compare the responses from her recipients with those of the average consumer.

Pay your data some attention – If you have gaps in your database, create a campaign via email or on your website that seeks to gain a better picture of both your prospects and your customers. Alternatively, you can connect your email platform to your CRM or e-commerce software to get access to live customer data

Strategize your segmentation – Dividing by two and hoping for the best hasn’t worked since school, so start thinking about what your brand can offer to different consumers, and create intelligent segments based on your results. Quizzes, competitions, and preference surveys are a great way to collect additional explicit data, on top of implicit data such as order history and behavioral data.

Think harder about context – You need to keep up to date with what’s happening with your different audiences. Got an internationally active brand? Make sure your content is going to be relevant to everyone – and don’t forget about delivering your emails at a time that the recipient is likely to be looking at email or at least be awake. dotmailer’s Send Time Optimization feature gets your message to your recipient’s inbox at the time that is best for them.

Split-test ‘til the cows come home – Performing a split-test is a brilliant way to find out what works for your brand in a time-effective manner. You can afford to be creative when your ideas are backed up by intelligent reporting.

What can you put in place for 2017?

Get better insight – dotmailer’s WebInsight tool lets you track prospects’ and customers’ online behaviors. You can then use the data you receive to send relevant, automated campaigns that “react” to your recipients most recent actions on your site.

Nurture your valued customers – With a tool like dotmailer’s OrderInsight, you can quickly and easily data-mine your customers to identify those highest scoring by frequency and value of purchase, as well as product category. Then design a targeted appreciation campaign for your most valued segments in minutes using our drag-and-drop segmentation tool.

Get to know our friends – We’ve got the top pick of partners to boost campaign relevancy. Phrasee gives you the insight on what subject lines will perform best for you, Sweet Tooth is the number one platform for points based loyalty programs, and Moveable Ink eats real-time relevancy for breakfast.

Want to get more of the most up-to-date data on the habits of email consumers? Book now for the 2017 DMA Email Tracking Report launch!

Reblogged 7 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com