Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience

As marketers, we want to influence our customers and clients to follow the path to conversion. But this can be a challenge for all of us – this is where Nathalie Nahai, the web psychologist, can help. She teaches global audiences about the link between behavioral sciences and the digital space, helping you build a better understanding of how to persuade your audience to take the desired path.

We were so impressed with Nathalie that we invited her to speak at this year’s dotmailer Summit where she’ll be bringing together the latest insights from the world of psychology, neuroscience and behavioral economics to explain the underlying dynamics and motivations behind consumer behavior.

In this blog we posed Nathalie a series of questions – read on to find out some secret hacks, interesting facts and a brief insight into what you’ll be taking away from the dotmailer Summit.

Get your ticket today because this is the one event you don’t want to miss.

Can you tell us a little more about yourself and how you found yourself drawn to web psychology – from what we’ve seen you have a really fascinating background, so it’ll be interesting to see who or what inspired you on your journey?

“Thank you, it’s been a rather unpredictable trajectory!”

“Having studied psychology at university, upon leaving I went straight to Central St Martins to explore fine art, something I have always had a passion for. During my time at CSM I’d been recording music on the side, and I thought it would come in handy to know how to develop websites to help promote myself. So, I went to some classes and as I progressed I ended up taking on freelance work.”

“I began thinking about joining a design agency, when a good friend of mine (who was just leaving agency life for something more entrepreneurial) suggested I hold off for a bit and explore some co-working spaces instead. I found a lovely place to work from where the organiser asked me to run some psychology-related workshops, and the penny started to drop. If psychology could shed light on the factors that influence our behaviours in the physical world, surely it could provide some insight into what shapes our decisions online, too.”

“I looked for books and postgraduate courses on the subject, but at the time I couldn’t find any resources that combined research from the fields of psychology, computer science, human-computer-interaction, marketing, ethics, cross-cultural studies, behavioural economics and UX (the latter two subjects having not yet hit the mainstream). Frustrated by the lack of an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach, I decided to write a book that would allow me to draw these threads together into something I would personally find useful to read, and after a couple of years of trawling through countless studies, Webs Of Influence was conceived – and that’s where it all started.”

What do you think the key messages are in what you do? And how to do you think you help to empower people?

“There are a few key messages in what I do… Firstly, we’re not rational agents and our decision-making is open to influence, both on- and off-line. Secondly, to understand and connect with people in a meaningful way, we have to understand their psychological context, which includes universal, cultural and individual differences. Thirdly – and this is the most important – we have an ethical responsibility to use these insights to create mutually beneficial experiences, which means being transparent (not using dark patterns), delivering on what we promise (providing real value), creating a great customer experience (building trust over time), and respecting people’s privacy (not using covert forms of tracking to follow, coerce or manipulate users into taking certain actions).”

Can you give a small indication into what you will be covering at the dotmailer Summit – perhaps the key takeaways people can expect to leave with?

“People can expect to leave with specific, actionable principles that they can use straight away to create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience that customers will want to come back to experience again.”

There has been a lot of talk recently about how our technology is impacting us and what we can do about it – have you got any key thoughts on this subject? And how you see this influencing our lives and our future?

“Yes I have a several thoughts on this! I think that the most important and pressing issue in this debate is having a space (or spaces) in which we can share, discuss and learn about what’s at stake, and what our choices might be for shaping the world in which we want to live.”

“We’re starting to see a greater interest in how technology can be designed and used to influence and manipulate behaviours, questions which, in my opinion, go to the heart of what it means to be human. Personally, I want to live in a society in which the individual is sovereign – we would own our own data by default and be able to choose with whom to share it, and we would be free from surveillance outside of public spaces – whether physically (via cameras and microphones in the home, or through biometric sensors which are fast becoming reality), or virtually (through the content we share and the activities we engage in online).”

What’s your favorite social medium to engage in?

“It used to be Twitter, but it feels as though it’s become so noisy that I now tend to engage more with Instagram, which I use to connect with a smaller, closer community.”

Any tips or hacks on what obvious mistakes sites make that discourage customers from buying?

“Yes – in a bid to stay on top of design trends, brands will often create websites, content and apps that look great but actually deflect attention away from the all-important call to action. A great example here is when brands use auto-playing videos on their websites – the motion will detract attention away from the CTA and will often lower conversion rates as a result. If you have to use video, reduce the amount of background motion that’s involved, so that users have the chance to locate and understand the call to action.”

Have you come across any interesting facts about global user behavior that you could share with us?

“Yes – high load times frustrate users no matter where they’re from! More seriously though, one of the most important factors that will impact the success of a business, is trust. If you can provide customers with something they value in a way that is frictionless and even joyful, not only will they be more likely to return to use your service and recommend you to their peers, they will also be more forgiving when you make mistakes – which in the amplified world of social media, can go a long way to protecting your reputation.”

And lastly has there been anything that has truly inspired you lately?

“Yes, although it’s on a completely different note! I’ve been studying academic drawing at Barcelona Academy of Art, and I’m finding the whole process extraordinary (if you want to check out some of my work you can find it here on Instagram).”

 

Thank you so much Nathalie for sharing some insights into web psychology, as well as some general inspiration. We’re looking forward to welcoming you on stage on the 19th April at the dotmailer Summit 2018.

You can find out more about the dotmailer Summit here, and for more consumer behavior insights, check out our email psychology whitepaper.

The post Create a more exciting, rewarding and engaging user experience appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 4 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Email marketing is evolving and knowing your KPIs is more important than ever

KPIs or key performance indicators are becoming ever more integral to the reporting and analysis of email marketing.

There are many reasons why email KPIs are a must, but most importantly:

  • they make it easier for you to align your efforts with wider department/company objectives
  • they help you define success, benchmark against tangible goals and track what works and what doesn’t – so you’ll know what to repeat, and what to never do again!

It’s important to embrace KPIs and view them as a valuable means to drive success rather than pinpoint failure, both individual and company-wide. Metrics help you make sense of all your marketing efforts, putting you in a better position to optimize activities so they contribute highly to overall business growth. 90% of executives surveyed in a recent Return Path report believe that their email marketing strategy is successful in achieving wider business objectives.

A great way to plan your KPIs is to use the SMART planning methodology – this will ensure that metrics are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely. These are all pre-requisites in achieving value from your KPI process.

SMART

Specific – rather than say that you’ll focus on increasing open rates, say by how much i.e. “we aim to increase unique open rates by 5%”

Measurable – make sure you can measure the results of your efforts – luckily with email, just about everything is trackable!

Achievable – set goals which are a stretch and will require hard work, but which aren’t unrealistic. KPIs should be met continuously; falling at the first hurdle will just encourage a deviation from your core objectives

Realistic – think about ways you can turn your goals into reality. If we consider the increase in open rates example, think about how you would go about boosting this metric, via tools such as send time optimization and subject line testing

Timely – give yourself enough time to achieve your KPIs, but not so much time that they lack a sense of urgency and become redundant

Email marketing objectives

When putting KPIs into place, it’s important to understand your core email marketing objectives. The likely ones are:

  • Driving ROI
  • Maximizing conversions (downloads, demo requests, event registrations, purchases etc.)
  • Increasing list growth (i.e. organic: website, in-store)
  • Increasing opens and click throughs
  • Promoting social sharing
  • Reducing bounces
  • Decreasing unsubscribes

Of these objectives, ROI tends to be the most crucial for key stakeholders. However, as they’re all interconnected with revenue growth, it’s advisable to measure them individually so that you can better judge your email performance. According to Return Path, 67% of top executives surveyed in its report believe that conversions are the most useful KPI for measuring email success, followed by ROI and click throughs.

KPIs will be different for every single business. Start with your top-level goals, filter down to objectives and then set granular metrics that benchmark your success. Email is widely considered as the most effective online channel, essential in funnelling sales and driving revenue. Many will therefore have a vested interest, so it’s more important than ever to track and optimize its performance.

The post Email marketing is evolving and knowing your KPIs is more important than ever appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 6 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Google updates mobile product knowledge panels to show even more info in one spot

The real estate-heavy panels on mobile encompass multiple product images, more review sources, videos and, of course, Shopping ads.

The post Google updates mobile product knowledge panels to show even more info in one spot appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 7 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Google updates its mobile Test My Site tool with more competitive analysis

Google’s site speed tool now compares your site to your competitors’ and tells you how many visitors your site is losing because of your load time.

The post Google updates its mobile Test My Site tool with more competitive analysis appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 12 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Be a mad scientist to be more successful in local SEO

The debate rages on over the authoritative set of local ranking factors, but columnist Greg Gifford believes that local SEOs on both sides of the fence may be missing the point.

The post Be a mad scientist to be more successful in local SEO appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 year ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Local SEO is about so much more than tools

Tools can help us do our jobs more efficiently, but columnist Greg Gifford reminds us that they aren’t meant to do our jobs for us.

The post Local SEO is about so much more than tools appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 year ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

How to dominate local SEO: more challenging in an evolving local search environment

Columnist Sherry Bonelli explains how recent changes to the local search landscape point to an ever-changing discipline that requires increasingly complex strategies.

The post How to dominate local SEO: more challenging in an evolving local search environment appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 year ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Darryl, the man behind dotmailer’s Custom Technical Solutions team

Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

I first got to know dotmailer when the company was just a bunch of young enthusiastic web developers called Ellipsis Media back in 1999. I was introduced by one of my suppliers and we decided to bring them on board to build a recruitment website for one of our clients. That client was Amnesty International and the job role was Secretary General. Not bad for a Croydon company whose biggest client before that was Scobles the plumber’s merchants. So, I was probably dotmailer’s first ever corporate client! After that, I used dotmailer at each company I worked for and then one day they approached a colleague and me and asked us if we wanted to work for them. That was 2013.  We grabbed the opportunity with both hands and haven’t looked back since.

Tell us a bit about your role

I’m the Global Head of Technical Solutions which actually gives me responsibility for 2 teams. First, Custom Technical Solutions (CTS), who build bespoke applications and tools for customers that allow them to integrate more closely with dotmailer and make life easier. Second, Technical Pre-sales, which spans our 3 territories (EMEA, US and APAC) and works with prospective and existing clients to figure out the best solution and fit within dotmailer.

What accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I would say so far it has to be helping to turn the CTS team from just 2 people into a group of 7 highly skilled and dedicated men and women who have become an intrinsic and valued part of the dotmailer organization. Also I really enjoy being part of the Senior Technical Management team. Here we have the ability to influence the direction and structure of the platform on a daily basis.

Meet Darryl Clark – the cheese and peanut butter sandwich lover

Can you speak a bit about your background and that of your team? What experience and expertise is required to join this team?

My background is quite diverse from a stint in the Army, through design college, web development, business analysis to heading up my current teams. I would say the most valuable skill that I have is being highly analytical. I love nothing more than listening to a client’s requirements and digging deep to work out how we can answer these if not exceed them.

As a team, we love nothing more than brainstorming our ideas. Every member has a valid input and we listen. Everyone has the opportunity to influence what we do and our motto is “there is no such thing as a stupid question.”

To work in my teams you have to be analytical but open minded to the fact that other people may have a better answer than you. Embrace other people’s input and use it to give our clients the best possible solution. We are hugely detail conscious, but have to be acutely aware that we need to tailor what we say to our audience so being able to talk to anyone at any level is hugely valuable.

How much of the dotmailer platform is easily customizable and when does it cross over into something that requires your team’s expertise? How much time is spent on these custom solutions one-time or ongoing?

I’ll let you in on a little secret here. We don’t actually do anything that our customers can’t do with dotmailer given the right knowledge and resources. This is because we build all of our solutions using the dotmailer public API. The API has hundreds of methods in both SOAP and REST versions, which allows you to do a huge amount with the dotmailer platform. We do have a vast amount of experience and knowledge in the team so we may well be able to build a solution quicker than our customers. We are more than happy to help them and their development teams build a solution using us on a consultancy basis to lessen the steepness of the learning curve.

Our aim when building a solution for a customer is that it runs silently in the background and does what it should without any fuss.

What are your plans for the Custom Tech Solutions team going forward?

The great thing about Custom Technical Solutions is you never know what is around the corner as our customers have very diverse needs. What we are concentrating on at the moment is refining our processes to ensure that they are as streamlined as possible and allow us to give as much information to the customer as we can. We are also always looking at the technology and coding approaches that we use to make sure that we build the most innovative and robust solutions.

We are also looking at our external marketing and sharing our knowledge through blogs so keep an eye on the website for our insights.

What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

Most questions seem to revolve around reassurance such as “Have you done this before?”, “How safe is my data?”, “What about security?”, “Can you talk to my developers?”, “Do I need to do anything?”.  In most instances, we are the ones asking the questions as we need to find out information as soon as possible so that we can analyse it to ensure that we have the right detail to provide the right solution.

Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

We talk a lot about working with best of breed so for example a customer can use our Channel Extensions in automation programs to fire out an SMS to a contact using their existing provider. We don’t force customers down one route, we like to let them decide for themselves.

Also, I really like to emphasize the fact that there is always more than one way to do something within the dotmailer platform. This means we can usually find a way to do something that works for a client within the platform. If not, then we call in CTS to work out if there is a way that we can build something that will — whether this is automating uploads for a small client or mass sending from thousands of child accounts for an enterprise level one.

What do you see as the future of marketing automation technology?  Will one size ever fit all? Or more customization going forward?

The 64 million dollar question. One size will never fit all. Companies and their systems are too organic for that. There isn’t one car that suits every driver or one racquet that suits every sport. Working with a top drawer partner network and building our system to be as open as possible from an integration perspective means that our customers can make dotmailer mold to their business and not the other way round…and adding to that the fact that we are building lots of features in the platform that will blow your socks off.

Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m a dyed in the wool Gooner (aka Arsenal Football Club fan) thanks to my Grandfather leading me down the right path as a child. If you are still reading this after that bombshell, then food-wise I pretty much like everything apart from coriander which as far as I’m concerned is the Devils own spawn. I don’t really have a favorite band, but am partial to a bit of Level 42 and Kings of Leon and you will also find me listening to 90s drum and bass and proper old school hip hop. My favorite holiday destination is any decent villa that I can relax in and spend time with my family and I went to Paris recently and loved that. Guilty pleasure – well that probably has to be confessing to liking Coldplay or the fact that my favorite sandwich is peanut butter, cheese and salad cream. Go on try it, you’ll love it.

Want to meet more of the dotmailer team? Say hi to Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support, and Dan Morris, EVP for North America.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com