5 reasons to come to the dotdigital Summit

At the 2019 dotdigital Summit we’re uncovering the key to working smarter, not harder. You’re already working hard. We know that for a fact. We can see it in the amazing marketing we witness on every channel, every day. But we’ve got the hot-tips to help achieve more, without doing more.

We’ll be hosting our third annual summit at the Tobacco Docks on Wednesday 20 March, where we’ll be joined by an exciting line-up of industry-leaders giving talks and leading workshops.

If that isn’t enough to get you excited, check out these 5 cracking reasons to join us!

1) Try something new

At dotdigital we’re all about inspiring you guys to be the best you can be. Take a day to get out of the office see what you can learn. Open your mind up to new possibilities and opportunities during thought-provoking key-note addresses. Get hands-on help at our informative and insightful workshops. Wherever you go, whatever you choose we can guarantee you’ll come out excited and invigorated about something you never expected.

2) Glimpse into the future

We, just like you, always have one eye on the future of marketing. But we don’t just want to talk about what’s coming, we want to show you why and how you can use it. You’ll be surprised to find it’s easier and faster to implement than you think.

3) It’s all about you

For the 2019 Summit, we’ve added a brand-new theme, and it’s all about you. Four of our break-away sessions will be dedicated to your personal development. From courageous conversations to finding the perfect healthy work-life balance. You’ll leave the dotdigtial Summit empowered in more ways than one.

4) Make meaningful connections

Join 1,500 other digital marketing professionals from all walks of life, in a vast array of industries. Meet marketers and market leaders as they converge at the Summit in London. Whether you’re making new friends or talking shop, dotdigital is here to help you make meaningful connections. Networking has never been so fun, and we’ll give you plenty to talk about.

5) Fun times

At dotdigital, we’re firm believers that all work and no play is no way to live! No one wants to be stuck in a room, listening to someone drone on about something you already know. That’s why our speakers come from all backgrounds and industries and have something provocative to say. But, most importantly, we know how to put on a show!

Beat the rush and get your tickets now!

Get your pre-launch Earlybird tickets today.

Earlybird rate is £250+VAT, tickets are normally £400+VAT.

Your ticket will allow you to pre-register for sessions, confirming your spots before everyone else, it also include food and drink throughout the day provided by awesome street food vendors, free prize giveaways, and a drinks reception.

The post 5 reasons to come to the dotdigital Summit appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

3 reasons why the email universe is much like the Star Wars universe

1. Email clients are much like the planets

There are some planets in Star Wars that are highly important and feature throughout the Saga, such as Corusant, the capital of the Galaxy. It is critical to the plot and the characters have to plan strategically how to engage with it. In the email universe this planet is Gmail. It is by far the most popular email client and one that is growing with every new generation. Email marketers cannot ignore Gmail and have to plan strategically how they’ll work with the client.
There are some planets like Tatooine that are equally as important and are critical to the plot. However, Tatooine has a rough landscape, with little investment in the infrastructure and the inhabitants of the planet. This is much like Hotmail, it was once the most popular email client but with very little investment, many Hotmail users have chosen to abandon ship and move to Gmail.
Then there are planets like Mustafar; inhospitable, desolate and with a threat of volcanic eruptions. Mustafar is a place where it’s impossible to survive and no-one particularly wants to visit, just like Lotus Notes! And finally we have Alderaan, which was destroyed by higher powers and bears similarities to the fate of AltaVista; it was acquired by Yahoo in 2003 and subsequently shut down in 2013.

2. The Force is like the good and bad side of email

The Force is the ubiquitous power in the Star Wars universe. The Sith from the dark side of the force are working to take power in the Galaxy, whereas the Jedi work tirelessly to protect it. The Sith are unethical, brutal and will do anything to get this power. In this analogy, email spammers are the Sith of the email universe. They will do anything and everything they can to dupe and lie to people. They will steal their money, their identities, and in some cases cause incredible damage. On the other hand, you have organisations like Spamcop and Spamhaus; many ESPs and industry organisations like the DMA fight against unethical conduct in email. They work tirelessly to protect the average Jane from these vicious attacks.

3. The Star Wars Saga will never die, much like email

Star Wars began almost 40 years ago; it has eight movies, 11 TV Series, over 100 video games and hundreds more books. In 1983 many thought it was over when the Return of the Jedi was released; the plot seemed so final surely it was the end? Then in 1999 LucasFilms kicked off the second phase of the Saga. 2005 arrived and we all thought it was over, until Disney purchased LucasFilms and kicked it all off again. This is a franchise that will continue to give for many more years to come. And here it comes…much like email. Email will never die. For every new craze, phase and social channel, email has become so ubiquitous with our daily lives. As technology improves and new innovations come into play, email becomes more and more ingrained into the fabric of society.

So there you have it, I have successfully linked two facets of my own life together.

“May the force be with you”.

The post 3 reasons why the email universe is much like the Star Wars universe appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Five reasons why email is THE core channel for “on-the-go” customers of an e-commerce business

People say that email – a channel with a history spanning five decades – is dead. But I don’t buy it. According to Forrester, approximately 122,500,453,020 emails are sent every hour.

Here are five reasons why email is the core channel for your everyday consumer:

  1. Effectively reflects your brand image
  2. Cheap & drives conversions
  3. Dynamic (i.e. personalization & segmentation)
  4. Consistent, coordinated and deliverable
  5. Very measurable for marketers

Email is very much alive, and has in fact undergone years of evolution into the channel that the consumer wants it to be. Nowadays, for a marketing channel to prove valuable to business strategy, it needs to provide the flexibility and adaptability that the hyper-connected consumer desires. Email is a blank canvas for the marketer – it’s a cost-effective channel to reach prospects & customers, with an on-brand message that drives ROI through dynamic campaigns that keep people engaged. As long as you use email intelligently (i.e. you have the data and tech in place) and employ an on-brand strategy, this channel could prove an essential component in the success of your e-commerce business, whether B2B or B2C. These case studies on workwear provider Alexandra and British homeware brand Cabbages and Roses provide the perfect illustration.

If you’re looking to up your email marketing automation game, these campaigns will give you a jump-start:

Abandon Cart email – “We’re ready when you are.”

Triggering emails on the back of abandoned baskets is a great way to drive revenue and increase conversion. Having insight data in your email marketing platform allows you to store behavioral information on your subscribers in order to drive intelligent and engaging interactions, ultimately leading to conversion. For example, a customer might log onto your website via desktop, browse, and add products to their cart. Then, for some reason they may close their browser. Rather than this information being lost, it can be pushed into your email platform, stored, and then utilized to send the customer an email with their basket details and a CTA for checkout. Email is therefore the perfect tool to recuperate the abandoned customer journey.

Post-purchase email – “We’ve missed you, have you missed us?”

Triggering emails on the back of a customer’s purchase information is something every online retailer should be doing; it’s integral to the e-commerce handbook. Segmenting customers based on recency, frequency and monetary value (RFM model) is a great way to target your audience because it will subsequently drive ROI. For example, rather than sending generic offers on shoes to your entire database, you might want to send a particular segment a 10% discount offer on a high-value pair of stilettos, because this segment has an average lifetime value (ALV) of over £2,000 and they have bought more than 1 pair of stilettos in the past year. They also haven’t purchased for 3 months, hence the offer. This segment is more likely to action over the rest of the database. Sending highly personalized messages through dynamic content will have a greater chance of increasing key metrics, such as click-through-rates (CTRs) and conversions.

At the end of the day, it’s the simple measures that prove essential – segmenting, targeting and personalization drives value right to the top of your customer’s inbox (if your deliverability is top notch, that is).

To see eight other key programs you should be sending to grow your e-commerce business, pick up your free copy of our best practice guide.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

8 reasons why your ecommerce business needs marketing automation

Here are eight solid reasons your ecommerce business needs marketing automation:

  1.      Easier to personalize marketing campaigns

Consumers want to see and hear things that are personal to them, especially in a world where they’re faced with increased noise and distractions. By being able to ask questions and collect more data, and make offers that are specific to that customer and their purchase history, you’ll have a better chance of gaining repeat business. With dynamic content and email marketing automation, these steps are accomplished without actually having to personalize each email individually; instead, it just requires an initial setup with a top marketing automation platform.

  1.      Easier customer targeting across multiple channels

These days there are so many channels across which you can market, with email, social media and SMS providing just a few examples. One of the best things about this variety is that your multichannel strategy can be devised so that you reach out to the right people, at the right times and in the right places. However, taking this job on manually can prove inefficient and time-consuming. Marketing automation enables you to send targeted marketing across all channels, reaching your intended audience when and where it suits them.

  1.      Improved lead generation and conversion

While repeat business is always important, generating new leads and turning those leads into new customers is just as critical. When your business obtains a new lead, it’s wise that you connect with them immediately. Running manual lead engagement means that often, some potentials will inevitably slip through the cracks.

You can set up your marketing automation program to target all leads that come in and connect with each one in a way that matters to them. All lead engagements will be tracked and can be further targeted as they interact with your communications.

  1.      Better opportunity for cross-selling and upselling

One of the key tactics to increase sales and drive repeat business has always been upselling and cross-selling. Ensuring customers know about upgrades or accessories that go with the product they purchased can be a quick win.

With marketing automation, you can use customers’ order data to send personalized emails that let them know about additional products that are relevant to them. For example, if you were selling a pair of suede shoes you might want to recommend a suede protector spray. This will increase the average order value and lifetime value of your customers, and ideally keep them coming back for more.

Marketing automation saves time, enables scalability and drives up incremental revenue

  1.      Management of cart abandonment

Cart abandonment has become an epidemic in the world of ecommerce, with consumers abandoning a whopping 68% of carts. Marketing automation can help by allowing you to send out triggered abandonment emails.

You can target a customer who has abandoned their cart and send them an email after it’s remained neglected for a specified amount of time. When crafting the email, it should not only remind someone that they have items in their cart, but also encourage them to complete their transaction.

  1.      Improved post-transaction marketing

Marketing to the customer who has already purchased your product is as important as marketing to potential customers. The idea behind post-purchase marketing is to provide incentive for repeat business, and marketing automation makes this easy to do. You can promote products that are related to what the customer just bought, you can personalize the email to better relate to their purchase behaviour, and provide personal replenishment or loyalty discounts.

  1.      Improved analytics

Investing in email marketing automation means better analytics. Every aspect of your marketing campaign can be tracked and reported on, as the majority of marketing automation platforms can be integrated with analytics platforms, such as Google Analytics. Every aspect of a marketing campaign can be broken down so you can analyze the data and see where you’re doing well and where you need to optimize.

  1.      It’s a time-saver

This might be one of the greatest benefits to marketing automation. In reality, you have probably experienced the realization that manual marketing communications can become a major time-suck. With automation tools, your time can be better used searching out new products, developing new services, or devoted to some other aspect of your ecommerce business strategy. Simply put, when your marketing communications are automated, you will not only decrease your workload, but also have a stronger, more efficient, and completely optimized marketing campaign.

If you’d like to find out how you can go about introducing email marketing automation to your business, download our free ‘Making time to save time’ guide. Alternatively, check out our ‘Find the right marketing automation tactics for you’ document, which includes inspiration and real-life success stories.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Meet Dan Morris, Executive Vice President, North America

  1. Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

The top three reasons were People, Product and Opportunity. I met the people who make up our business and heard their stories from the past 18 years, learned about the platform and market leading status they had built in the UK, and saw that I could add value with my U.S. high growth business experience. I’ve been working with marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners for years across a series of different roles, and saw that I could apply what I’d learned from that and the start-up space to dotmailer’s U.S. operation. dotmailer has had clients in the U.S. for 12 years and we’re positioned to grow the user base of our powerful and easy-to-use platform significantly. I knew I could make a difference here, and what closed the deal for me was the people.  Every single person I’ve met is deeply committed to the business, to the success of our customers and to making our solution simple and efficient.  We’re a great group of passionate people and I’m proud to have joined the dotfamily.

Dan Morris, dotmailer’s EVP for North America in the new NYC office

      1. Tell us a bit about your new role

dotmailer has been in business and in this space for more than 18 years. We were a web agency, then a Systems Integrator, and we got into the email business that way, ultimately building the dotmailer platform thousands of people use daily. This means we know this space better than anyone and we have the perfect solutions to align closely with our customers and the solutions flexible enough to grow with them.  My role is to take all that experience and the platform and grow our U.S. presence. My early focus has been on identifying the right team to execute our growth plans. We want to be the market leader in the U.S. in the next three years – just like we’ve done in the UK –  so getting the right people in the right spots was critical.  We quickly assessed the skills of the U.S. team and made changes that were necessary in order to provide the right focus on customer success. Next, we set out to completely rebuild dotmailer’s commercial approach in the U.S.  We simplified our offers to three bundles, so that pricing and what’s included in those bundles is transparent to our customers.  We’ve heard great things about this already from clients and partners. We’re also increasing our resources on customer success and support.  We’re intensely focused on ease of on-boarding, ease of use and speed of use.  We consistently hear how easy and smooth a process it is to use dotmailer’s tools.  That’s key for us – when you buy a dotmailer solution, we want to onboard you quickly and make sure you have all of your questions answered right away so that you can move right into using it.  Customers are raving about this, so we know it’s working well.

  1. What early accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I’ve been at dotmailer for eight months now and I’m really proud of all we’ve accomplished together.  We spent a lot of time assessing where we needed to restructure and where we needed to invest.  We made the changes we needed, invested in our partner program, localized tech support, customer on-boarding and added customer success team members.  We have the right people in the right roles and it’s making a difference.  We have a commercial approach that is clear with the complete transparency that we wanted to provide our customers.  We’ve got a more customer-focused approach and we’re on-boarding customers quickly so they’re up and running faster.  We have happier customers than ever before and that’s the key to everything we do.

  1. You’ve moved the U.S. team to a new office. Can you tell us why and a bit about the new space?

I thought it was very important to create a NY office space that was tied to branding and other offices around the world, and also had its own NY energy and culture for our team here – to foster collaboration and to have some fun.  It was also important for us that we had a flexible space where we could welcome customers, partners and resellers, and also hold classes and dotUniversity training sessions. I’m really grateful to the team who worked on the space because it really reflects our team and what we care about.   At any given time, you’ll see a training session happening, the team collaborating, a customer dropping in to ask a few questions or a partner dropping in to work from here.  We love our new, NYC space.

We had a spectacular reception this week to celebrate the opening of this office with customers, partners and the dotmailer leadership team in attendance. Please take a look at the photos from our event on Facebook.

Guests and the team at dotmailer's new NYC office warming party

Guests and the team at dotmailer’s new NYC office warming party

  1. What did you learn from your days in the start-up space that you’re applying at dotmailer?

The start-up space is a great place to learn. You have to know where every dollar is going and coming from, so every choice you make needs to be backed up with a business case for that investment.  You try lots of different things to see if they’ll work and you’re ready to turn those tactics up or down quickly based on an assessment of the results. You also learn things don’t have to stay the way they are, and can change if you make them change. You always listen and learn – to customers, partners, industry veterans, advisors, etc. to better understand what’s working and not working.  dotmailer has been in business for 18 years now, and so there are so many great contributors across the business who know how things have worked and yet are always keen to keep improving.  I am constantly in listening and learning mode so that I can understand all of the unique perspectives our team brings and what we need to act on.

  1. What are your plans for the U.S. and the sales function there?

On our path to being the market leader in the U.S., I’m focused on three things going forward: 1 – I want our customers to be truly happy.  It’s already a big focus in the dotmailer organization – and we’re working hard to understand their challenges and goals so we can take product and service to the next level. 2 – Creating an even more robust program around partners, resellers and further building out our channel partners to continuously improve sales and customer service programs. We recently launched a certification program to ensure partners have all the training and resources they need to support our mutual customers.  3 – We have an aggressive growth plan for the U.S. and I’m very focused on making sure our team is well trained, and that we remain thoughtful and measured as we take the steps to grow.  We want to always keep an eye on what we’re known for – tools that are powerful and simple to use – and make sure everything else we offer remains accessible and valuable as we execute our growth plans.

  1. What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

The questions we usually get are around price, service level and flexibility.  How much does dotmailer cost?  How well are you going to look after my business?  How will you integrate into my existing stack and then my plans for future growth? We now have three transparent bundle options with specifics around what’s included published right on our website.  We have introduced a customer success team that’s focused only on taking great care of our customers and we’re hearing stories every day that tells me this is working.  And we have all of the tools to support our customers as they grow and to also integrate into their existing stacks – often integrating so well that you can use dotmailer from within Magento, Salesforce or Dynamics, for example.

  1. Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

In addition to the ones above – ease of use, speed of use and the ability to scale with you. With dotmailer’s tiered program, you can start with a lighter level of functionality and grow into more advanced functionality as you need it. The platform itself is so easy to use that most marketers are able to build campaigns in minutes that would have taken hours on other platforms. Our customer success team is also with you all the way if ever you want or need help.  We’ve built a very powerful platform and we have a fantastic team to help you with personalized service as an extended part of your team and we’re ready to grow with you.

  1. How much time is your team on the road vs. in the office? Any road warrior tips to share?

I’ve spent a lot of time on the road, one year I attended 22 tradeshows! Top tip when flying is to be willing to give up your seat for families or groups once you’re at the airport gate, as you’ll often be rewarded with a better seat for helping the airline make the family or group happy. Win win! Since joining dotmailer, I’m focused on being in office and present for the team and customers as much as possible. I can usually be found in our new, NYC office where I spend a lot of time with our team, in customer meetings, in trainings and other hosted events, sales conversations or marketing meetings. I’m here to help the team, clients and partners to succeed, and will always do my best to say yes! Once our prospective customers see how quickly and efficiently they can execute tasks with dotmailer solutions vs. their existing solutions, it’s a no-brainer for them.  I love seeing and hearing their reactions.

  1. Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m originally from Yorkshire in England, and grew up just outside York. I moved to the U.S. about seven years ago to join a very fast growing startup, we took it from 5 to well over 300 people which was a fantastic experience. I moved to NYC almost two years ago, and I love exploring this great city.  There’s so much to see and do.  Outside of dotmailer, my passion is cars, and I also enjoy skeet shooting, almost all types of music, and I love to travel – my goal is to get to India, Thailand, Australia and Japan in the near future.

Want to find out more about the dotfamily? Check out our recent post about Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support.

Reblogged 2 years ago from blog.dotmailer.com

4 reasons the world would end at the demise of local SEO

It’s hard to imagine a world without local search. Columnist Lydia Jorden delves into four different industries that must optimize for local search, paired with a specific strategy to help optimize for streamlined customer searches. Does your local search strategy encompass these techniques?

The…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Why Effective, Modern SEO Requires Technical, Creative, and Strategic Thinking – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

There’s no doubt that quite a bit has changed about SEO, and that the field is far more integrated with other aspects of online marketing than it once was. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand pushes back against the idea that effective modern SEO doesn’t require any technical expertise, outlining a fantastic list of technical elements that today’s SEOs need to know about in order to be truly effective.

For reference, here’s a still of this week’s whiteboard. Click on it to open a high resolution image in a new tab!

Video transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week I’m going to do something unusual. I don’t usually point out these inconsistencies or sort of take issue with other folks’ content on the web, because I generally find that that’s not all that valuable and useful. But I’m going to make an exception here.

There is an article by Jayson DeMers, who I think might actually be here in Seattle — maybe he and I can hang out at some point — called “Why Modern SEO Requires Almost No Technical Expertise.” It was an article that got a shocking amount of traction and attention. On Facebook, it has thousands of shares. On LinkedIn, it did really well. On Twitter, it got a bunch of attention.

Some folks in the SEO world have already pointed out some issues around this. But because of the increasing popularity of this article, and because I think there’s, like, this hopefulness from worlds outside of kind of the hardcore SEO world that are looking to this piece and going, “Look, this is great. We don’t have to be technical. We don’t have to worry about technical things in order to do SEO.”

Look, I completely get the appeal of that. I did want to point out some of the reasons why this is not so accurate. At the same time, I don’t want to rain on Jayson, because I think that it’s very possible he’s writing an article for Entrepreneur, maybe he has sort of a commitment to them. Maybe he had no idea that this article was going to spark so much attention and investment. He does make some good points. I think it’s just really the title and then some of the messages inside there that I take strong issue with, and so I wanted to bring those up.

First off, some of the good points he did bring up.

One, he wisely says, “You don’t need to know how to code or to write and read algorithms in order to do SEO.” I totally agree with that. If today you’re looking at SEO and you’re thinking, “Well, am I going to get more into this subject? Am I going to try investing in SEO? But I don’t even know HTML and CSS yet.”

Those are good skills to have, and they will help you in SEO, but you don’t need them. Jayson’s totally right. You don’t have to have them, and you can learn and pick up some of these things, and do searches, watch some Whiteboard Fridays, check out some guides, and pick up a lot of that stuff later on as you need it in your career. SEO doesn’t have that hard requirement.

And secondly, he makes an intelligent point that we’ve made many times here at Moz, which is that, broadly speaking, a better user experience is well correlated with better rankings.

You make a great website that delivers great user experience, that provides the answers to searchers’ questions and gives them extraordinarily good content, way better than what’s out there already in the search results, generally speaking you’re going to see happy searchers, and that’s going to lead to higher rankings.

But not entirely. There are a lot of other elements that go in here. So I’ll bring up some frustrating points around the piece as well.

First off, there’s no acknowledgment — and I find this a little disturbing — that the ability to read and write code, or even HTML and CSS, which I think are the basic place to start, is helpful or can take your SEO efforts to the next level. I think both of those things are true.

So being able to look at a web page, view source on it, or pull up Firebug in Firefox or something and diagnose what’s going on and then go, “Oh, that’s why Google is not able to see this content. That’s why we’re not ranking for this keyword or term, or why even when I enter this exact sentence in quotes into Google, which is on our page, this is why it’s not bringing it up. It’s because it’s loading it after the page from a remote file that Google can’t access.” These are technical things, and being able to see how that code is built, how it’s structured, and what’s going on there, very, very helpful.

Some coding knowledge also can take your SEO efforts even further. I mean, so many times, SEOs are stymied by the conversations that we have with our programmers and our developers and the technical staff on our teams. When we can have those conversations intelligently, because at least we understand the principles of how an if-then statement works, or what software engineering best practices are being used, or they can upload something into a GitHub repository, and we can take a look at it there, that kind of stuff is really helpful.

Secondly, I don’t like that the article overly reduces all of this information that we have about what we’ve learned about Google. So he mentions two sources. One is things that Google tells us, and others are SEO experiments. I think both of those are true. Although I’d add that there’s sort of a sixth sense of knowledge that we gain over time from looking at many, many search results and kind of having this feel for why things rank, and what might be wrong with a site, and getting really good at that using tools and data as well. There are people who can look at Open Site Explorer and then go, “Aha, I bet this is going to happen.” They can look, and 90% of the time they’re right.

So he boils this down to, one, write quality content, and two, reduce your bounce rate. Neither of those things are wrong. You should write quality content, although I’d argue there are lots of other forms of quality content that aren’t necessarily written — video, images and graphics, podcasts, lots of other stuff.

And secondly, that just doing those two things is not always enough. So you can see, like many, many folks look and go, “I have quality content. It has a low bounce rate. How come I don’t rank better?” Well, your competitors, they’re also going to have quality content with a low bounce rate. That’s not a very high bar.

Also, frustratingly, this really gets in my craw. I don’t think “write quality content” means anything. You tell me. When you hear that, to me that is a totally non-actionable, non-useful phrase that’s a piece of advice that is so generic as to be discardable. So I really wish that there was more substance behind that.

The article also makes, in my opinion, the totally inaccurate claim that modern SEO really is reduced to “the happier your users are when they visit your site, the higher you’re going to rank.”

Wow. Okay. Again, I think broadly these things are correlated. User happiness and rank is broadly correlated, but it’s not a one to one. This is not like a, “Oh, well, that’s a 1.0 correlation.”

I would guess that the correlation is probably closer to like the page authority range. I bet it’s like 0.35 or something correlation. If you were to actually measure this broadly across the web and say like, “Hey, were you happier with result one, two, three, four, or five,” the ordering would not be perfect at all. It probably wouldn’t even be close.

There’s a ton of reasons why sometimes someone who ranks on Page 2 or Page 3 or doesn’t rank at all for a query is doing a better piece of content than the person who does rank well or ranks on Page 1, Position 1.

Then the article suggests five and sort of a half steps to successful modern SEO, which I think is a really incomplete list. So Jayson gives us;

  • Good on-site experience
  • Writing good content
  • Getting others to acknowledge you as an authority
  • Rising in social popularity
  • Earning local relevance
  • Dealing with modern CMS systems (which he notes most modern CMS systems are SEO-friendly)

The thing is there’s nothing actually wrong with any of these. They’re all, generally speaking, correct, either directly or indirectly related to SEO. The one about local relevance, I have some issue with, because he doesn’t note that there’s a separate algorithm for sort of how local SEO is done and how Google ranks local sites in maps and in their local search results. Also not noted is that rising in social popularity won’t necessarily directly help your SEO, although it can have indirect and positive benefits.

I feel like this list is super incomplete. Okay, I brainstormed just off the top of my head in the 10 minutes before we filmed this video a list. The list was so long that, as you can see, I filled up the whole whiteboard and then didn’t have any more room. I’m not going to bother to erase and go try and be absolutely complete.

But there’s a huge, huge number of things that are important, critically important for technical SEO. If you don’t know how to do these things, you are sunk in many cases. You can’t be an effective SEO analyst, or consultant, or in-house team member, because you simply can’t diagnose the potential problems, rectify those potential problems, identify strategies that your competitors are using, be able to diagnose a traffic gain or loss. You have to have these skills in order to do that.

I’ll run through these quickly, but really the idea is just that this list is so huge and so long that I think it’s very, very, very wrong to say technical SEO is behind us. I almost feel like the opposite is true.

We have to be able to understand things like;

  • Content rendering and indexability
  • Crawl structure, internal links, JavaScript, Ajax. If something’s post-loading after the page and Google’s not able to index it, or there are links that are accessible via JavaScript or Ajax, maybe Google can’t necessarily see those or isn’t crawling them as effectively, or is crawling them, but isn’t assigning them as much link weight as they might be assigning other stuff, and you’ve made it tough to link to them externally, and so they can’t crawl it.
  • Disabling crawling and/or indexing of thin or incomplete or non-search-targeted content. We have a bunch of search results pages. Should we use rel=prev/next? Should we robots.txt those out? Should we disallow from crawling with meta robots? Should we rel=canonical them to other pages? Should we exclude them via the protocols inside Google Webmaster Tools, which is now Google Search Console?
  • Managing redirects, domain migrations, content updates. A new piece of content comes out, replacing an old piece of content, what do we do with that old piece of content? What’s the best practice? It varies by different things. We have a whole Whiteboard Friday about the different things that you could do with that. What about a big redirect or a domain migration? You buy another company and you’re redirecting their site to your site. You have to understand things about subdomain structures versus subfolders, which, again, we’ve done another Whiteboard Friday about that.
  • Proper error codes, downtime procedures, and not found pages. If your 404 pages turn out to all be 200 pages, well, now you’ve made a big error there, and Google could be crawling tons of 404 pages that they think are real pages, because you’ve made it a status code 200, or you’ve used a 404 code when you should have used a 410, which is a permanently removed, to be able to get it completely out of the indexes, as opposed to having Google revisit it and keep it in the index.

Downtime procedures. So there’s specifically a… I can’t even remember. It’s a 5xx code that you can use. Maybe it was a 503 or something that you can use that’s like, “Revisit later. We’re having some downtime right now.” Google urges you to use that specific code rather than using a 404, which tells them, “This page is now an error.”

Disney had that problem a while ago, if you guys remember, where they 404ed all their pages during an hour of downtime, and then their homepage, when you searched for Disney World, was, like, “Not found.” Oh, jeez, Disney World, not so good.

  • International and multi-language targeting issues. I won’t go into that. But you have to know the protocols there. Duplicate content, syndication, scrapers. How do we handle all that? Somebody else wants to take our content, put it on their site, what should we do? Someone’s scraping our content. What can we do? We have duplicate content on our own site. What should we do?
  • Diagnosing traffic drops via analytics and metrics. Being able to look at a rankings report, being able to look at analytics connecting those up and trying to see: Why did we go up or down? Did we have less pages being indexed, more pages being indexed, more pages getting traffic less, more keywords less?
  • Understanding advanced search parameters. Today, just today, I was checking out the related parameter in Google, which is fascinating for most sites. Well, for Moz, weirdly, related:oursite.com shows nothing. But for virtually every other sit, well, most other sites on the web, it does show some really interesting data, and you can see how Google is connecting up, essentially, intentions and topics from different sites and pages, which can be fascinating, could expose opportunities for links, could expose understanding of how they view your site versus your competition or who they think your competition is.

Then there are tons of parameters, like in URL and in anchor, and da, da, da, da. In anchor doesn’t work anymore, never mind about that one.

I have to go faster, because we’re just going to run out of these. Like, come on. Interpreting and leveraging data in Google Search Console. If you don’t know how to use that, Google could be telling you, you have all sorts of errors, and you don’t know what they are.

  • Leveraging topic modeling and extraction. Using all these cool tools that are coming out for better keyword research and better on-page targeting. I talked about a couple of those at MozCon, like MonkeyLearn. There’s the new Moz Context API, which will be coming out soon, around that. There’s the Alchemy API, which a lot of folks really like and use.
  • Identifying and extracting opportunities based on site crawls. You run a Screaming Frog crawl on your site and you’re going, “Oh, here’s all these problems and issues.” If you don’t have these technical skills, you can’t diagnose that. You can’t figure out what’s wrong. You can’t figure out what needs fixing, what needs addressing.
  • Using rich snippet format to stand out in the SERPs. This is just getting a better click-through rate, which can seriously help your site and obviously your traffic.
  • Applying Google-supported protocols like rel=canonical, meta description, rel=prev/next, hreflang, robots.txt, meta robots, x robots, NOODP, XML sitemaps, rel=nofollow. The list goes on and on and on. If you’re not technical, you don’t know what those are, you think you just need to write good content and lower your bounce rate, it’s not going to work.
  • Using APIs from services like AdWords or MozScape, or hrefs from Majestic, or SEM refs from SearchScape or Alchemy API. Those APIs can have powerful things that they can do for your site. There are some powerful problems they could help you solve if you know how to use them. It’s actually not that hard to write something, even inside a Google Doc or Excel, to pull from an API and get some data in there. There’s a bunch of good tutorials out there. Richard Baxter has one, Annie Cushing has one, I think Distilled has some. So really cool stuff there.
  • Diagnosing page load speed issues, which goes right to what Jayson was talking about. You need that fast-loading page. Well, if you don’t have any technical skills, you can’t figure out why your page might not be loading quickly.
  • Diagnosing mobile friendliness issues
  • Advising app developers on the new protocols around App deep linking, so that you can get the content from your mobile apps into the web search results on mobile devices. Awesome. Super powerful. Potentially crazy powerful, as mobile search is becoming bigger than desktop.

Okay, I’m going to take a deep breath and relax. I don’t know Jayson’s intention, and in fact, if he were in this room, he’d be like, “No, I totally agree with all those things. I wrote the article in a rush. I had no idea it was going to be big. I was just trying to make the broader points around you don’t have to be a coder in order to do SEO.” That’s completely fine.

So I’m not going to try and rain criticism down on him. But I think if you’re reading that article, or you’re seeing it in your feed, or your clients are, or your boss is, or other folks are in your world, maybe you can point them to this Whiteboard Friday and let them know, no, that’s not quite right. There’s a ton of technical SEO that is required in 2015 and will be for years to come, I think, that SEOs have to have in order to be effective at their jobs.

All right, everyone. Look forward to some great comments, and we’ll see you again next time for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

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