Karina Hollekim to speak at dotdigital Summit 2019

SummitLet’s delve into this year’s second speaker for the dotdigital Summit 2019.

About Karina:

Karina Hollekim, in her own words, is not an extraordinary girl, but she’s done extraordinary things. She is a female pioneer and was the first women in the world to perform a skibase.

Her last jump – November 2006 in Switzerland – was “super-safe”. A routine skydive, from a plane, over water, with friends.

It almost killed her.

Karina’s near-fatal skydiving accident turned her life upside down: she was left in a wheelchair with the cruel prediction that she’d never be able to walk again. She endured 20 surgeries and had to relearn how to walk. But with an inspirational lust for life, Karina has returned to skiing and is living every day to the fullest.

Karina believes there is a drive in us all to follow our dreams and entertain the kid that still lives within us. In her inspirational talk, she describes a life of no regrets and always taking action. Her story is one of finding passion, choosing the life you want, and then never giving up on that dream. Karina’s ability to push the boundaries, stay focused, and have the power to re-mobilize through hardship, will leave you motivated to leave the fear behind and pursue the life you want.

Our time on earth is limited, so you better start making it happen.

Karina believes that fear shouldn’t be getting in your way of this.

Her autobiography, ‘The Wonderful Feeling of Fear’, is internationally published and her speech is part of the exclusive TedX talks.

Join us on the 20th March to hear this electrifying talk, which will leave you inspired to achieve as much as you can in your working and personal life. Register for dotdigital Summit 2019 here.

The post Karina Hollekim to speak at dotdigital Summit 2019 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 5 days ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Speaker announcement for dotdigital Summit 2019

Let’s delve into this year’s first speaker for the dotdigital Summit 2019.

About Tim

Tim is a senior columnist for the Financial Times. His long-running column, ‘The Undercover Economist’, reveals the economic ideas behind everyday experiences. He also writes op-eds, interviews, and long feature articles for the daily newspaper. He’s an evangelist for the power of economics and has spoken at TED, PopTech, and Sydney Opera House.

He is author of ‘Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy’, ‘Messy’, and the million-selling ‘The Undercover Economist’. As well as a senior columnist at the Financial Times, Tim is the presenter of Radio 4’s ‘More or Less’ and the iTunes-topping series, ‘Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy’.

 

 

The keynote

During Tim’s presentation he will be investigating how certain kinds of complexities and obstacles can actually improve our performance. He will be covering the topics of cognitive psychology, complexity science, social psychology, and, of course, throwing ‘Rock n Roll’ into the mix for good measure.

Can disruption, mess, and crazy moves actually help solve some of our most complex problems? Tim examines this and talks about how we shouldn’t be scared of complexity, as it can in fact make us more creative! Just because you don’t like it doesn’t mean it isn’t helping you!

Don’t miss out!

Join us on the 20th March 2019: don’t miss out on this opportunity to hear a great speaker with exceptional insight into the complexities of everyday experiences, and how we can thrive in them!

Register for the Summit here.

The post Speaker announcement for dotdigital Summit 2019 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 6 days ago from blog.dotmailer.com

5 reasons to come to the dotdigital Summit

At the 2019 dotdigital Summit we’re uncovering the key to working smarter, not harder. You’re already working hard. We know that for a fact. We can see it in the amazing marketing we witness on every channel, every day. But we’ve got the hot-tips to help achieve more, without doing more.

We’ll be hosting our third annual summit at the Tobacco Docks on Wednesday 20 March, where we’ll be joined by an exciting line-up of industry-leaders giving talks and leading workshops.

If that isn’t enough to get you excited, check out these 5 cracking reasons to join us!

1) Try something new

At dotdigital we’re all about inspiring you guys to be the best you can be. Take a day to get out of the office see what you can learn. Open your mind up to new possibilities and opportunities during thought-provoking key-note addresses. Get hands-on help at our informative and insightful workshops. Wherever you go, whatever you choose we can guarantee you’ll come out excited and invigorated about something you never expected.

2) Glimpse into the future

We, just like you, always have one eye on the future of marketing. But we don’t just want to talk about what’s coming, we want to show you why and how you can use it. You’ll be surprised to find it’s easier and faster to implement than you think.

3) It’s all about you

For the 2019 Summit, we’ve added a brand-new theme, and it’s all about you. Four of our break-away sessions will be dedicated to your personal development. From courageous conversations to finding the perfect healthy work-life balance. You’ll leave the dotdigtial Summit empowered in more ways than one.

4) Make meaningful connections

Join 1,500 other digital marketing professionals from all walks of life, in a vast array of industries. Meet marketers and market leaders as they converge at the Summit in London. Whether you’re making new friends or talking shop, dotdigital is here to help you make meaningful connections. Networking has never been so fun, and we’ll give you plenty to talk about.

5) Fun times

At dotdigital, we’re firm believers that all work and no play is no way to live! No one wants to be stuck in a room, listening to someone drone on about something you already know. That’s why our speakers come from all backgrounds and industries and have something provocative to say. But, most importantly, we know how to put on a show!

Beat the rush and get your tickets now!

Get your pre-launch Earlybird tickets today.

Earlybird rate is £250+VAT, tickets are normally £400+VAT.

Your ticket will allow you to pre-register for sessions, confirming your spots before everyone else, it also include food and drink throughout the day provided by awesome street food vendors, free prize giveaways, and a drinks reception.

The post 5 reasons to come to the dotdigital Summit appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 1 month ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018

On a gorgeous April day, over 1,000 international marketers gathered at the Park Plaza in the heart of London to discover even greater digital potential. This year’s event was jam-packed with inspiring talks, breakout sessions and technical workshops designed to help our delegates advance their day-to-day marketing. There was so much going on during the day that you had to be super switched on to catch it all. In case you missed any of the highlights, here are our top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018:

  1. Powerful and empowering women in business

It’s safe to say that the 2018 Summit played host to some serious titans of the industry, and we were thrilled to see the agenda opened and closed by two powerful and empowering women. Natalie Nahai, author and web psychologist, showed us how she advises Fortune 500 companies like Google, eBay and Unilever how to use online persuasion to win over and retain business. We learned about homophily, cognitive load and how to engage with customers in a more meaningful way.

Our keynote speaker this year was Baroness Karren Brady, one of the most influential, high profile and respected female business leaders in the UK and rated among the 50 most inspirational people in the world. Karren gifted us her own top 10 ingredients for success along with a witty, provocative and inspiring insight into her career journey.

  1. GDPR reassurance

It was easy to predict that GDPR would feature heavily on the agenda this year, but the key takeaways were far from dry, doomy and gloomy. In his primary session, dotmailer’s Strategy & Insight Director, Skip Fidura, showed us to treat GDPR as an opportunity to strengthen our data and build more compelling, trusted relationships with customers through automation. And Rachel Aldighieri, Managing Director at the DMA, got us thinking about how marketers can work effectively and creatively within these new parameters.

  1. 1,142 delegates

After welcoming over 600 marketers last year at dotmailer’s inaugural Summit, we set out to make 2018 a year of international empowerment. Watching over 1,000 digital marketers discover, grow and network throughout the day was one of our highlights. In fact, dotmailer’s CEO, Phil Draper, let it get to his head a little. Here he is pretending to be his favorite artist, Ed Sheeran:

  1. Twitter trending

While the hottest news on 19th April was undoubtedly the 26° heat (welcome to the UK!), it was awesome to see #dotmailersummit take the no.2 spot on Twitter as an equally hot topic. We loved checking in throughout the day to see so many empowered marketers tweet their key learnings from our knowledgeable speakers. Plus, it’s always good to know the lunch went down a treat!

  1. 849 app downloads

The dotmailer Summit 2018 welcomed 30 international speakers to deliver on 27 session topics across three speaking tracks – so we wanted to make sure delegates could get organized. Marketers in attendance were able to follow, schedule and query every session using our free dotmailer Summit app. With ¾ of attendees making use of the app on the day, you can bet it’ll be back for 2019.

  1. Launching an evolved dotmailer

2018 Summit delegates were able to get a first look at the brand-new innovations happening within the dotmailer platform. With 27% of revenue generated by automation over batch-and-blast campaigns, marketers need to be able to flex their mailing muscles. dotmailer users now have access to 30 new free automation programs to help them deliver on rising customer expectations. In order to help our customers hit every contact on the right channel, we’ve incorporated Facebook Messenger into the platform, and our new COMAPI acquisition brings sophisticated SMS capabilities on-board. Add free Facebook Audience and Google Adword Re-targeting to every account, chuck BigQuery into the mix and you’ve got a souped-up omnichannel automation platform with no need to pay for a complementary tech provider. Oh – and we’ve added a native product recommendations tool. Innovating dotmailer, empowering you!

  1. Hitting the Mark 2018

Summit attendees were the first to gain access to insight from dotmailer’s biggest and beefiest benchmarking report, Hitting the Mark. Attendees were able to snap up the latest statistics on segmentation, as well as learn how many brands are still leaving money on the table by failing to send an abandoned cart email. Plus, we revealed this year’s number one marketer. Want to find out for yourself? Download the full report.

  1. Wayne Hemmingway

One of the most inspirational talks from the day came from Red or Dead and Hemingway designs co-founder, Wayne Hemingway, who showed the audience that “Design is about improving the things that matter in life.” The compelling businessman – who’s provided sustainable designs for tube uniforms, student accommodation and entire housing estates – entertained and inspired with his personal anecdotes. To achieve perfection in design, Hemmingway urged marketers: “Spot something that’s wrong and make it right.”

  1. Customer insight

At dotmailer, we know our customers are true superstars, so it was awesome to see Charlotte Hilton from Sika take the stage to show audiences how they’ve harness automation to build trust in B2B marketing. Alongside Charlotte, attendees were able to hear success stories from Tom Wheatley of Shortlist Media and Sarah Elphick of Forest Holidays – to name a few! See the agenda for a full list of dotmailer superstars who lent their expertise on the day.

  1. Our partners in tech

From our superb Gold partners, Magento and Shopify plus, who helped realise the Summit 2018, to the inspiring session on trust and social proof from Neil Bayton at Trustpilot, attendees were able to access expertise from a seriously eclectic mix of tech experts. See the full list of partners for 2018.

 

Don’t believe the hype? Check out some videos from the day.

See you next year!

The post Top 10 moments from the dotmailer Summit 2018 appeared first on The Marketing Automation Blog.

Reblogged 8 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

dotmailer Summit LIVE: up-to-the minute news throughout the event

What’s the order of the day?

  • Ellen and Ross will be covering all the morning’s events, which includes an introduction from dotmailer’s founders, plus presentations from Rory Sutherland, Touker Suleyman, Forrester’s Shar VanBoskirk and many more
  • In the afternoon, Ross will be reporting on the ‘Digital excellence’ stream while Ellen provides highlights from ‘The ecommerce gameplan’
  • Finally, Ellen takes to the blog to share the stories from James Cracknell OBE’s motivational finale keynote

You can see the full line-up on the dedicated Summit microsite.

New Updates

The post dotmailer Summit LIVE: up-to-the minute news throughout the event appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Try Your Hand at A/B Testing for a Chance to Win the Email Subject Line Contest

Posted by danielburstein

This blog post ends with an opportunity for you to win a stay at the ARIA in Vegas and a ticket to
Email Summit, but it begins with an essential question for marketers…

How can you improve already successful marketing, advertising, websites and copywriting?

Today’s Moz blog post is unique. Not only are we going to teach you how to address this challenge, we’re going to offer an example that you can dig into to help drive home the lesson.

Give the people what they want

Some copy and design is so bad, the fixes are obvious. Maybe you shouldn’t insult the customer in the headline. Maybe you should update the website that still uses a dot matrix font.

But when you’re already doing well, how can you continue to improve?

I don’t have the answer for you, but I’ll tell you who does – your customers.

There are many tricks, gimmicks and technology you can use in marketing, but when you strip away all the hype and rhetoric, successful marketing is pretty straightforward –
clearly communicate the value your offer provides to people who will pay you for that value.

Easier said than done, of course.

So how do you determine what customers want? And the best way to deliver it to them?

Well, there are many ways to learn from customers, such as focus groups, surveys and social listening. While there is value in asking people what they want, there is also a major challenge in it. “People’s ability to understand the factors that affect their behavior is surprisingly poor,” according to research from Dr. Noah J. Goldstein, Associate Professor of Management and Organizations, UCLA Anderson School of Management.

Or, as Malcolm Gladwell more glibly puts it when referring to coffee choices, “The mind knows not what the tongue wants.”

Not to say that opinion-based customer preference research is bad. It can be helpful. However, it should be the beginning and not the end of your quest.

…by seeing what they actually do

You can use what you learn from opinion-based research to create a hypothesis about what customers want, and then
run an experiment to see how they actually behave in real-world customer interactions with your product, marketing messages, and website.

The technique that powers this kind of research is often known as A/B testing, split testing, landing page optimization, and/or website optimization. If you are testing more than one thing at a time, it may also be referred to as multi-variate testing.

To offer a simple example, you might assume that customers buy your product because it tastes great. Or because it’s less filling. So you could create two landing pages – one with a headline that promotes that taste (treatment A) and another that mentions the low carbs (treatment B). You then send half the traffic that visits that URL to each version and see which performs better.

Here is a simple visual that Joey Taravella, Content Writer, MECLABS create to illustrate the concept…

That’s just one test. To really learn about your customers, you must continue the process and create a testing-optimization cycle in your organization – continue to run A/B tests, record the findings, learn from them, create more hypotheses, and test again based on these hypotheses.

This is true marketing experimentation, and helps you build your theory of the customer.

But you probably know all that already. So here’s your chance to practice while helping us shape an A/B test. You might even win a prize in the process.

The email subject line contest

The Moz Blog and MarketingExperiments Blog have joined forces to run a unique marketing experimentation contest. We’re presenting you with a real challenge from a real organization (VolunteerMatch) and
asking you to write a subject line to test (it’s simple, just leave your subject line as a comment in this blog post).

We’re going to pick three subject lines suggested by readers of The Moz Blog and three from the MarketingExperiments Blog and run a test with this organization’s customers. Whoever writes the best performing subject line will
win a stay at the ARIA Resort in Las Vegas as well as a two-day ticket to MarketingSherpa Email Summit 2015 to help them gain lessons to further improve their marketing.

Sound good? OK, let’s dive in and tell you more about your “client”…

Craft the best-performing subject line to win the prize

Every year at Email Summit, we run a live A/B test where the audience helps craft the experiment. We then run, validate, close the experiment, and share the results during Summit as a way to teach about marketing experimentation. We have typically run the experiment using MarketingSherpa as the “client” website to test (MarketingExperiments and MarketingSherpa are sister publications, both owned by MECLABS Institute).

However, this year we wanted to try something different and interviewed three national non-profits to find a new “client” for our tests.

We chose
VolunteerMatch – a nonprofit organization that uses the power of technology to make it easier for good people and good causes to connect. One of the key reasons we chose VolunteerMatch is because it is an already successful organization looking to further improve. (Here is a case study explaining one of its successful implementations – Lead Management: How a B2B SaaS nonprofit decreased its sales cycle 99%).

Another reason we chose VolunteerMatch for this opportunity is that it has three types of customers, so the lessons from the content we create can help marketers across a wide range of sales models. VolunteerMatch’s customers are:

  • People who want to volunteer (B2C)
  • Non-profit organizations looking for volunteers (non-profit)
  • Businesses looking for corporate volunteering solutions (B2B) to which it offers a Software-as-a-Service product through VolunteerMatch Solutions

Designing the experiment

After we took VolunteerMatch on as the Research Partner “client,” Jon Powell, Senior Executive Research and Development Manager, MECLABS, worked with Shari Tishman, Director of Engagement and Lauren Wagner, Senior Manager of Engagement, VolunteerMatch, to understand their challenges, take a look at their current assets and performance, and craft a design of experiments to determine what further knowledge about its customers would help VolunteerMatch improve performance.

That design of experiments includes a series of split tests – including the live test we’re going to run at Email Summit, as well as the one you have an opportunity to take part in by writing a subject line in the comments section of this blog post. Let’s take a look at that experiment…

The challenge

VolunteerMatch wants to increase the response rate of the corporate email list (B2B) by discovering the best possible messaging to use. In order to find out, MarketingExperiments wants to run an A/B split test to determine the
best messaging.

However the B2B list is relatively smaller than the volunteer/cause list (B2C) which makes it harder to test in (and gain
statistical significance) and determine which messaging is most effective.

So we’re going to run a messaging test to the B2C list. This isn’t without its challenges though, because most individuals on the B2C list are not likely to immediately connect with B2B corporate solutions messaging.

So the question is…

How do we create an email that is relevant (to the B2C list), which doesn’t ask too much, that simultaneously helps us discover the most relevant aspect of the solutions (B2B) product (if any)?

The approach – Here’s where you come in

This is where the Moz and MarketingExperiments community comes in to help.

We would like you to craft subject lines relevant to the B2C list, which highlight various benefits of the corporate solutions tool.

We have broken down the corporate solutions tool into three main categories of benefit for the SaaS product.
In the comments section below, include which category you are writing a subject line for along with what you think is an effective subject line.

The crew at Moz and MarketingExperiments will then choose the top subject line in each category to test. Below you will find the emails that will be sent as part of the test. They are identical, except for the subject lines (which you will write) and the bolded line in the third paragraph (that ties into that category of value).

Category #1: Proof, recognition, credibility


Category #2: Better, more opportunities to choose from


Category #3: Ease-of-use

About VolunteerMatch’s brand

Since we’re asking you to try your hand at crafting messaging for this example “client,” here is some more information about the brand to inform your messaging…


VolunteerMatch’s brand identity


VolunteerMatch’s core values

Ten things VolunteerMatch believes:

  1. People want to do good
  2. Every great cause should be able to find the help it needs
  3. People want to improve their lives and communities through volunteering
  4. You can’t make a difference without making a connection
  5. In putting the power of technology to good use
  6. Businesses are serious about making a difference
  7. In building relationships based on trust and excellent service
  8. In partnering with like-minded organizations to create systems that result in even greater impact
  9. The passion of our employees drives the success of our products, services and mission
  10. In being great at what we do

And now, we test…

To participate, you must leave your comment with your idea for a subject line before midnight on Tuesday, January 13, 2015. The contest is open to all residents of the 50 US states, the District of Columbia, and Canada (excluding Quebec), 18 or older. If you want more info, here are the
official rules.

When you enter your subject line in the comments section, also include which category you’re entering for (and if you have an idea outside these categories, let us know…we just might drop it in the test).

Next, the Moz marketing team will pick the subject lines they think will perform best in each category from all the comments on The Moz Blog, and the MarketingExperiments team will pick the subject lines we think will perform the best in each category from all the comments on the MarketingExperiments Blog.

We’ll give the VolunteerMatch team a chance to approve the subject lines based on their brand standards, then test all six to eight subject lines and report back to you through the Moz and MarketingExperiments blogs which subject lines won and why they won to help you improve your already successful marketing.

So, what have you got? Write your best subject lines in the comments section below. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

Related resources

If you’re interested in learning more about marketing experimentation and A/B testing, you might find these links helpful…

And here’s a look at a previous subject line writing contest we’ve run to give you some ideas for your entry…


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Reblogged 4 years ago from moz.com

We’re going to Digital Dallas; 9th-10th December

Next week we’ll be heading back to Dallas to wrap up a busy conference year. Mel Carson, Bill Hartzer, and Dixon Jones will be attending The Dallas Digital Summit, as part of the Techmedia series, which takes place on the 9th to 10th December. The show will be focusing on digital strategies, content marketing and…

The post We’re going to Digital Dallas; 9th-10th December appeared first on Majestic Blog.

Reblogged 4 years ago from blog.majestic.com

Be Intentional about Your Content & SEO Goals or Face Certain Failure – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

We’re seeing more and more companies investing in content marketing, and that’s a great thing. Many of them, however, are putting less thought than they should into the specific goals behind the content they produce. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand covers examples of goals for targeting different kinds of people, from those who merely stumbled upon your site to those who are strongly considering becoming customers.

For reference, here’s a still of this week’s whiteboard!

Video transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about being intentional about the content investments that you make. Now this is particularly important because otherwise it can lead to doom.

I got to organize the Foundry CEO Summit last week in Boulder, Colorado. I’m not sure when you are watching this. It might be several weeks ago now. But in any case, I’m talking with a bunch of CEOs and we have a number of discussion topics. One of the discussion topics, which was my personal favorite, one of the ones I was moderating was the top of funnel customer acquisition.

So I’m talking with a lot of these CEOs, B2B and B2C CEOs, about their content marketing efforts. Virtually everyone is investing in content marketing or thinking about it, which is awesome because it is very powerful. But many of them are investing in it somewhat unintentionally, or they haven’t talked with their CMOs and their marketing teams about precisely what that content is.

So we pulled up a couple of blogs from some of the participants. I’m kind of looking through like, “I’m not sure that there’s a strategic initiative behind all of the content that’s being produced.” That can be hugely helpful, and that’s true both for the content side of it and for the SEO side of it.

Many of the folks who are watching Whiteboard Friday undoubtedly are really deep into the tactics and the SEO side. So this video is for your managers, for your bosses, for you to help them understand how to choose content investments and what to expect from different kinds of investments.

Let me show you what I mean. Different kinds of content exist to target people at different sections of their experience with your site: at the consideration phase, where they’re close to buying, this is really for people who are thinking about buying your product; at the discovery phase for people who are just learning about your product or company; and at the viral or super broad content phase, where you’re not even necessarily trying to attract an audience that might buy from you, you’re doing other kinds of things.

So I’m going to try and walk through each of these. I’m actually going to start with the one that’s closest to the conversion process or the conversion point in that process.

So let’s imagine that I’m going to be the marketer at GeekDesk. GeekDesk sells these great sit-stand desks. I have one at home. I have one here at Moz. I love them to death because I stand up and work. I have sciatica in my left leg that I’ve had for many years, and I’ve been trying to work on that. One of the things I did is switch to a sit-stand desk. I actually almost never put it in sit mode anymore. I’m standing all the time. But in any case, GeekDesk makes great ones, ones that I really like.

So if I’m working at GeekDesk, my consideration phase content might be things like the models page, the models of all the different GeekDesks that I can buy. It might be a page on the advantages of the GeekDesk preset heights. GeekDesk has these little settings. I can push one, two, three, four, and it’ll go to different heights. I have one at home where I can push it to two, and it will go to the height for Geraldine so she can work at my desk. Then I press one, and it goes to my height. Then I press three, I haven’t pre-programmed three or four yet. But in any case, maybe if Elijah comes over, I’ll set one for you.

It might be “GeekDesk warranty and return policy,” or “sit-stand desks from GeekDesk.” These are kind of product-centric things. My content goals here are product awareness and conversion. I’m trying to get people to know about the products that I offer and to convert them to buyers.

This is really about information for those potential buyers. So my audience, naturally, is going to be customers, potential customers, and maybe also some media that’s already planning to write about me, which is why I want to have things like great photography and probably some testimonial quotes and all that kind of stuff.

The SEO targets for these types of pages are going to be my branded keywords — certainly things like “GeekDesk” and “GeekDesk desks” and whatever the models that I’ve got are — and then non-branded keywords that are directly, exactly tied to the products that my customers are going to perform when they search. These are things like sit-stand desks or adjustable height desks. That’s what this stuff is targeting.

This is very classic, very old-school kind of SEO and almost not even in the realm really of content marketing. These are just kind of product-focused pages. You should have plenty of these on your site, but they don’t always have overlap with these other things, and this is where I think the challenge comes into play.

Discovery phase content is really different. This is content like benefits of standing desks. That’s a little broader than GeekDesk. That’s kind of weird. Why would I write about that instead of benefits of GeekDesk? Well, I’m trying to attract a bigger audience. 99% of the content that you’ll ever see me present or write about is not why you should use Moz tools. That’s intentional. I don’t like promoting our stuff all that much. In fact, I’m kind of allergic to it, which has its own challenges.

In any case, this is targeting an audience that I am trying to reach who will learn from me. So I might write things like why sitting at a desk might significantly harm your health or companies that have moved to standing desks. I’d have a list of them, and I have some testimonials from companies that have moved to standing desks. They don’t even have to be on my product. I’m just trying to sell more of the idea and get people engaged with things that might potentially tie to my business. How to be healthy at work, which is even broader.

So these content goals are a little different. I’m trying to create awareness of the company. I just want people to know that GeekDesk exists. So if they come and they consume this content, even if they never become buyers, at least they will know and have heard of us. That’s important as well.

Remember television commercial advertisers pay millions and millions of dollars just to get people to know that they exist. That’s creating those brand impressions, and after more and more brand impressions, especially over a given time frame, you are more likely to know that brand, more likely to trust them, conversion rates go up, all those kinds of things.

I’m also trying to create awareness of the issues. I sometimes don’t even care if you remember that that great piece of content about how to be healthy at work came from GeekDesk. All I care is that you remember that standing at work is probably healthier for you than sitting. That’s what I hope to spread. That’s the virality that I hope to create there. I want to help people so that they trust, remember, and know me in the future. These are the goals around discovery phase content.

That audience can be potential customers, but there’s probably a much broader audience with demographic or psychographic overlap with my customers. That can be a group that’s tremendously larger, and some small percentage of them might someday be customers or customer targets. This is probably also people like media, influencers, and potential amplifiers. This may be a secondary piece, but certainly I hope to reach some of those.

The SEO targets are going to be the informational searches that these types of folks will perform and broad keywords around my products. This is not my personal products, but any of the types of products that I offer. This also includes broad keywords around my customers’ interests. That might be “health at work,” that might be “health at home,” that might be broadly dealing with issues like the leg issue that I’ve got, like sciatica stuff. It can be much broader than just what my product helps solve.

Then there’s a third one. These two I think get conflated more than anything else. This is more the viral, super broad content. This is stuff like, “Scientific studies show that work will kill you. Here’s how.” Wow. That sounds a little scary, but it also sounds like something that my aunt would post on Facebook.

“Work setups at Facebook versus Google versus Microsoft.” I would probably take a look at that article. I want to see what the different photographs are and how they differ, especially if they are the same across all of them. That would surprise me. But I want to know why they have uniqueness there.

“The start-up world’s geekiest desk setup.” That’s going to be visual content that’s going to be sailing across the Web. I definitely want to see that.

“An interactive work setup pricing calculator.” That is super useful, very broad. When you think about the relationship of this to who’s going to be in my potential customer set, that relationship is pretty small. Let’s imagine that this is the Venn diagram of that with my actual customer base. It’s a really tiny little overlap right there. It’s a heart-shaped Venn diagram. I don’t know why that is. It’s because I love you.

The content goals around this are that I want to grow that broad awareness, just like I did with my informational content. I want to attract links. So few folks, especially outside of SEOs and content marketers, really understand this. What happens here is I’m going to attract links with this broad or more viral focused content, and those links will actually help all of this content rank better. This is the rising tide of domain authority that lifts all of the ships, all of the pages on the domain and their potential ranking ability. That’s why you see folks investing in this regularly to boost up the ranking potential of these.

That being said, as we’ve talked about in a previous Whiteboard Friday, Google is doing a lot more domain association and keyword level domain association. So if you do the “problems with abusing alcohol” and that happens to go viral on your site, that probably won’t actually help you rank for any of this stuff because it is completely outside the topic model of what all of these things are about. You want to be at least somewhat tangentially related in a semantic way.

Finally, I want to reach an audience outside of my targets for potential serendipity. What do I mean by that? I’m talking about I want to reach someone who has no interest in sitting and standing desks, but might be an investor for me or a supplier for me or a business development partner. They might be someone who happens to tell someone who happens to tell another someone, that long line of serendipity that can happen through connections. That’s what this viral content is about.

So the audience is really not just specific influencers or customers, but anyone who might influence potential customers. It’s a big, broad group. It’s not just these people in here. It’s these people who influence them and those people who influence them. It’s a big, broad group.

Then I’m really looking for a link likely audience with this kind of content. I want to find people who can amplify, people who can socially share, people who can link directly through a blog, through press and media, through resources pages, that kind of stuff.

So my SEO targets might be really broad keywords that have the potential to reach those amplifiers. Sometimes — I know this is weird for me to say — it is okay to have none at all, no keyword target at all. I can imagine a lot of viral content that doesn’t necessarily overlap with a specific keyword search but that has the potential to earn a lot of links and reach influencers. Thus, you kind of go, “Well, let’s turn off the SEO on this one and just at least make it nicely indexable and make the links point to all the right places back throughout here so that I’m bumping up their potential visibility.”

This fits into the question of: What type of content strategy am I doing? Why am I investing in this particular piece? Before you create a piece of content or pitch a piece of content to your manager, your CMO, your CEO, you should make sure you know which one it is. It is so important to do that, because otherwise they’ll judge this content by this ROI and this content by these expectations. That’s just not going to work. They’re going to look at their viral content and go, “I don’t see any conversions coming from this. That was a waste.”

That’s not what it was about. You have to create the right expectations for each kind of content in which you are going to be investing.

All right everyone, I hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of Whiteboard Friday. We will see you again next week. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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