4 local SEO tips for restaurants

While general SEO wisdom is applicable if you’re running a restaurant website, contributor Dave Davies digs into the details of the options available especially for this business category.

The post 4 local SEO tips for restaurants appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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Reblogged 3 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

5 Tips to Help Show ROI from Local SEO

Posted by JoyHawkins

Earlier this year, when I was first writing my advanced local SEO training, I reached out to some users who work for local SEO agencies and asked them what they’d like more training on. The biggest topic I got as a result was related to tracking and reporting value to small business owners.

My clients will often forward me reports from their prior SEO company, expressing that they have no idea what they were getting for their money. Some of the most common complaints I see with these reports are:

  • Too much use of marketing lingo (“Bounce Rate,” “CTR,” etc.)
  • Way too much data
  • No representation of what impact the work done had on the business itself (did it get them more customers?)

If a small business owner is giving you hundreds or thousands of dollars every month, how do you prove to them they’re getting value from it? There’s a lot to dig into with this topic — I included a full six pages on it in my training. Today I wanted to share some of the most successful tips that I use with my own clients.


1. Stop sending automated Google Analytics reports

If the goal is to show the customer what they’re getting from their investment, you probably won’t achieve it by simply sending them an Analytics report each month. Google Analytics is a powerful tool, but it only looks awesome to you because you’re a marketer. Over the past year, I’ve looked at many monthly reports that made my head spin — it’s just too much data. The average SMB isn’t going to be able to look at those reports and figure out how their bounce rate decreasing somehow means you’re doing a great job at SEO.

2. Make conversions the focus of your report

What does the business owner care about? Hint: it’s not how you increased the ranking for one of their 50 tracked keywords this month. No, what they care about is how much additional business you drove to their business. This should be the focus of the report you send them.

3. Use dynamic number insertion to track calls

If you’re not already doing this, you’re really killing your ability to show value. I don’t have a single SEO or SEM client that isn’t using call tracking. I use Call Tracking Metrics, but CallRail is another one that works well, too. This allows you to see the sources of incoming calls. Unlike slapping a call tracking number on your website, dynamic number insertion won’t mess up NAP consistency.

The bonus here is that you can set up these calls as goals in Google Analytics. Using the Landing Page report, you can see which pages on the site were responsible for getting that call. Instead of saying, “Hey customer, a few months ago I created this awesome page of content for you,” you can say “Hey customer, a few months ago, I added this page to your site and as a result, it’s got you 5 more calls.”
Conversion goal completion in Google Analytics

4. Estimate revenue

I remember sitting in a session a couple years ago when Dev Basu from Powered by Search told me about this tactic. I had a lightbulb moment, wondering why the heck I didn’t think to do this before.

The concept is simple: Ask the client what the average lifetime value of their customer is. Next, ask them what their average closing ratio is on Internet leads. Take those numbers and, based on the number of conversions, you can calculate their estimated revenue.

Formula: Lifetime Value of a Customer x Closing Ratio (%) x Number of Conversions = Estimated Revenue

Bonus tip: Take this a step further and show them that for every dollar they pay you, you make them $X. Obviously, if the lifetime value of the customer is high, these numbers look a lot better. For example, an attorney could look like this:Example monthly ROI for an attorneyWhereas an insurance agent would look like this:
Example monthly ROI for an insurance agent

5. Show before/after screenshots, not a ranking tracker.

I seriously love ranking trackers. I spend a ton of time every week looking at reports in Bright Local for my clients. However, I really believe ranking trackers are best used for marketers, not business owners. How many times have you had a client call you freaking out because they noticed a drop in ranking for one keyword? I chose to help stop this trend by not including ranking reports in my monthly reporting and have never regretted that decision.

Instead, if I want to highlight a significant ranking increase that happened as a result of SEO, I can do that by showing the business owner a visual — something they will actually understand. This is where I use Bright Local’s screenshots; I can see historically how a SERP used to look versus how it looks now.


At the end of the day, to show ROI you need to think like a business owner, not a marketer. If your goals match the goals of the business owner (which is usually to increase calls), make sure that’s what you’re conveying in your monthly reporting.

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Reblogged 3 months ago from tracking.feedpress.it

Award season: top hints and tips to get a gong

It was a fantastic night, and aside from the delicious food, a few drinks and a very energetic dancefloor, it was amazing to see some of the fantastic work our customers and partners have been doing over the last 12 months.

The work showcased was of an unbelievably high standard, and for all those who submitted worthy work but didn’t quite make the podium, the aim for next year seems to be ‘how can we win?!’

I have been at dotmailer for 5 years, working as a Senior Account Manager, and my day-to-day role is to ensure my customers are getting the best out of dotmailer.

We are fortunate enough to have customers achieving outstanding results every day, yet writing a winning award entry can be really difficult; summing up all of that work, collaboration and effort in a concise story sometimes seems impossible.

However, fear not, because we have some super tips from our friends at the DMA who put on an awards entry workshop. Listen up!

Think about your audience

Similarly to viewing an email with the idea of ‘what’s in it for me?’, entries should be written with ‘would this story impress me?’ in mind. If your award entry isn’t impressive to you, it’s time to redraft before submitting to harsh, time-poor judges!

Clear before clever – judges will know if you’ve embellished

Although the award entry will need to be impressive, it’s also important to be clear and concise. Judges will know if the story is embellished so an easy-to-read entry will work in your favour.

Be confident and tell a good story

At the same time as being clear, like any good story, entries will need to be well written and confident. Put yourself in the judges’ shoes – after reading numerous entries all day, you’d appreciate a compelling, stand-out story.

Objectives –> Outcomes

As with any project, you’ll need a clear aim and proof that you have fulfilled this. As a sneaky trick, write the outcomes first and make sure your objectives match these.

Avoid Jargon

Any internal language used may be confusing to external judges – mirroring point 2, clear, concise and jargon-free.

Collaborative – talk to your Account Manager and any agencies early

With any award winning entry, one person cannot win alone. This is always a team effort! If you’re thinking of applying for a dotties award, get in touch with your Account Manager as soon as you can. If you’re looking to applying for other industry awards, such as the DMAs, it might be an idea to introduce all your agencies as soon as you can.

Don’t enter something before you’ve given it enough time for results

Some campaigns will be a short-term win, whereas some will take a while to mature. As much as it might be tempting to enter a campaign you’re excited about, you might find this is a winning entry the following year…

To many cooks will spoil it – make sure one person writes the finished entry

Awards are exciting and it’s only natural that everyone wants to be involved! However, let one person take final ownership of the award entry. A story written by numerous people will appear disjointed and inconsistent.

Vague results won’t make a winning entry

Show exactly how effective your campaign was. Get the exact ROI and any other stats that back up your story; vague results will make you appear less confident and less worthy.

Proof read!

And finally, after all your hard work, please make sure you proofread your entry! Get others to check it over; small typos and spelling mistakes can really devalue an otherwise great submission.

I hope you find all of these tips useful. If you’re a dotmailer customer and you’re interested in submitting an entry for 2018, get in touch with your Account Manager for more information.

If you’d like to find out more about the dotties, check out our microsite or see all the fun from the night.  

The post Award season: top hints and tips to get a gong appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 4 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

Tools and tips for data best practice

When sitting down to devise an email marketing strategy, it is always best to start from the very beginning. Review the core component of all emails: data; specifically the email address. Where has it come from? How did you get it? How clean is it?

Great quality data can act as rocket fuel to your email campaigns, which is no surprise when data sits at the core of all one-to-one marketing. But equally, bad data can severely affect your deliverability, particularly in light of the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), which is just around the corner.

Now would be the best time to review your data hygiene. Here are three dotmailer tools and tips to put you on the road to data best practice:

Watchdog

The Watchdog acts as the trusted guardian for your data when importing into dotmailer. Although the responsibility for the data very much remains with you (the data owner), the Watchdog screens all data imported into the platform and flags any questionable or risky content in order to protect your sender reputation.

It protects you on two levels:

  1. The Watchdog protects you from sending emails to any questionable data that’s been uploaded, ensuring high inbox placement and deliverability nurture.
  2. It also protects you from being affected by any other users sending to questionable data.

In summary, he’s a silent guardian, a watchful protector. A Dark Knight A Data Watchdog.

GSL

Data can and will decay if it’s not properly monitored, soiling your once pristine database; the recipient could have moved companies; perhaps they’re a B2B organisation and have changed name; it could even be that the recipient has abandoned their email addresses, due to the sheer volume of emails they receive.

Continuing to send to these email addresses is dangerous for your business. At best, you’re delivering emails that go unopened, or that are hard-bouncing. At worst, the email address is reclaimed and turned into a spam trap – and you could quite easily be blacklisted.

This is where the dotmailer’s Global Suppression List (GSL) comes into play. It scans your existing database against a list of known bad email addresses and can suppress these before they do any damage to your sending reputation. You can regularly use the GSL to clean up your data – find out how to do so by clicking here.

Sun Setting Policies

The last item on the agenda is implementing sun-setting policies for long-term un-engaged customers. In essence, what you are doing is filtering your database of all the contacts that have not opened your emails for a set period to answer the question: ‘Does the recipient still want to receive my emails?’

You could reach out and ask them the following:

  • If they want to continue being a subscriber
  • Ask them to manage their email preferences
  • Show them some love with a discount or special incentive

If they still don’t open or respond the next question should be: ‘Are they really receiving any value from me?’ Your communications aren’t improving your relationship with this customer and, if anything, are probably having a negative impact. Maybe it is time to send a ‘We’ll miss you, but good bye for now’ email. This communication informs the customer that you’ll be removing them from your marketing communications to avoid any potential annoyance, which in turn, saves you sending any more emails that don’t add value to the customer (also a great way to avoid sending to a recycled spam trap). Be sure to include a link to your preference center and, perhaps, a direct newsletter signup box, so that the customer can reengage at any time.

Adopting these tools and tips demonstrates you take data hygiene seriously by keeping your data as clean as possible within dotmailer. Being pro-active and giving your recipients a choice demonstrates responsibility and builds trust. However, as laws and legislation concerning data evolve, so will the road to data best practice. It’s important to keep up to date with new rules and regulations.

Ultimately, keeping your customer at the heart of everything you do will ensure you stay above board and can continue to provide extraordinary brand experiences.

To find out more on deliverability best practice, take a look at our 5 minute cheatsheet!

 

The post Tools and tips for data best practice appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 8 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

3 unforgettable email design tips

Marketers have the power to send flashy emails with advanced personalization, amazing creative and gripping copy. However, it is easy to get caught up with pushing the boundaries in your campaigns, and even easier to forget the basics of what should be best practice. The aim of this blog is to remind you of three important tips you must remember when putting together your campaigns.

  1. Remember the journey to open

When checking their emails most people think of three things: who is it? What is it? Where do I go from here?

There are three things that need to be in place to ensure a successful open rate. Your friendly from name and domain should identify who you are as a sender; the copy of your email should state your message clearly; your call-to-action should clearly tell the recipient what you would like them to do.

The call-to-action should be:

  • Above the fold

Allow the recipient to click through without having to scroll to find a button or a hyperlink.

  • Compelling

Give the recipient a real and urgent reason to act straight away.

  • Catchy

A good call-to-action should prompt the recipient to click immediately and not move on.

  • Frequent

Give the recipient more than one opportunity to click through.

  1. Balance between images and copy

An image can make your email look super sexy and sleek, or break it.

Make sure you choose an image that’s correctly sized so it doesn’t take too long to download, and ensure it’s in the appropriate file format. A general rule of thumb is: you can use JPEG’s for photos, and GIF’s for everything else.

The most important thing is to make sure your email works just as well without the images. Several email clients have images turned off by default, which will obviously change the way your email will initially look. Header text and alt tags should be visible when images are turned off to provide context. Only Taylor Swift likes a blank space!

In dotmailer, you can preview your email with images turned off prior to sending. Pretty handy, huh?

  1. Don’t forget mobile

Recent research from the DMA shows that the share of smartphone usage is now just shy of the desktop, with almost one third of consumers (31%) choosing smartphones as the main device to click through and buy.

When building your campaigns, remember that most mobile users only see 100 words per screen, and patience is low when on the move. This also applies to your subject lines – for example, iPhone users only see 30-40 characters of a subject line. Optimize your content to meet the requirements of a mobile user, with concise, clear copy, scalable images, and tappable CTAs. Check out how your emails look on mobile in dotmailer, prior to send, with our Litmus partnership.

Ultimately, the best person to tell you how your emails should look is your recipient. Split-test your campaigns, listen to your customers, and test how they respond to your creative with reporting metrics. Optimize your design strategy from the results, and watch your campaigns thrive.

Looking for more design inspo? Check out our 15 minute cheatsheet: On your marks: race to better emails with these 5 steps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1Source: DMA Consumer Email Tracking Study 2016 – https://dma.org.uk/research/consumer-email-tracker-2016

The post 3 unforgettable email design tips appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 9 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

SearchCap: Google & Bing pirate agreement, local SEO & PPC tips

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google & Bing pirate agreement, local SEO & PPC tips appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 9 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

3 local SEO tips that deliver business results

Looking to optimize your business website for local search, but not sure where to start? Columnist Ryan Shelley provides some tips for beginners.

The post 3 local SEO tips that deliver business results appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 10 months ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Meet Dan Morris, Executive Vice President, North America

  1. Why did you decide to come to dotmailer?

The top three reasons were People, Product and Opportunity. I met the people who make up our business and heard their stories from the past 18 years, learned about the platform and market leading status they had built in the UK, and saw that I could add value with my U.S. high growth business experience. I’ve been working with marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners for years across a series of different roles, and saw that I could apply what I’d learned from that and the start-up space to dotmailer’s U.S. operation. dotmailer has had clients in the U.S. for 12 years and we’re positioned to grow the user base of our powerful and easy-to-use platform significantly. I knew I could make a difference here, and what closed the deal for me was the people.  Every single person I’ve met is deeply committed to the business, to the success of our customers and to making our solution simple and efficient.  We’re a great group of passionate people and I’m proud to have joined the dotfamily.

Dan Morris, dotmailer’s EVP for North America in the new NYC office

      1. Tell us a bit about your new role

dotmailer has been in business and in this space for more than 18 years. We were a web agency, then a Systems Integrator, and we got into the email business that way, ultimately building the dotmailer platform thousands of people use daily. This means we know this space better than anyone and we have the perfect solutions to align closely with our customers and the solutions flexible enough to grow with them.  My role is to take all that experience and the platform and grow our U.S. presence. My early focus has been on identifying the right team to execute our growth plans. We want to be the market leader in the U.S. in the next three years – just like we’ve done in the UK –  so getting the right people in the right spots was critical.  We quickly assessed the skills of the U.S. team and made changes that were necessary in order to provide the right focus on customer success. Next, we set out to completely rebuild dotmailer’s commercial approach in the U.S.  We simplified our offers to three bundles, so that pricing and what’s included in those bundles is transparent to our customers.  We’ve heard great things about this already from clients and partners. We’re also increasing our resources on customer success and support.  We’re intensely focused on ease of on-boarding, ease of use and speed of use.  We consistently hear how easy and smooth a process it is to use dotmailer’s tools.  That’s key for us – when you buy a dotmailer solution, we want to onboard you quickly and make sure you have all of your questions answered right away so that you can move right into using it.  Customers are raving about this, so we know it’s working well.

  1. What early accomplishments are you most proud of from your dotmailer time so far?

I’ve been at dotmailer for eight months now and I’m really proud of all we’ve accomplished together.  We spent a lot of time assessing where we needed to restructure and where we needed to invest.  We made the changes we needed, invested in our partner program, localized tech support, customer on-boarding and added customer success team members.  We have the right people in the right roles and it’s making a difference.  We have a commercial approach that is clear with the complete transparency that we wanted to provide our customers.  We’ve got a more customer-focused approach and we’re on-boarding customers quickly so they’re up and running faster.  We have happier customers than ever before and that’s the key to everything we do.

  1. You’ve moved the U.S. team to a new office. Can you tell us why and a bit about the new space?

I thought it was very important to create a NY office space that was tied to branding and other offices around the world, and also had its own NY energy and culture for our team here – to foster collaboration and to have some fun.  It was also important for us that we had a flexible space where we could welcome customers, partners and resellers, and also hold classes and dotUniversity training sessions. I’m really grateful to the team who worked on the space because it really reflects our team and what we care about.   At any given time, you’ll see a training session happening, the team collaborating, a customer dropping in to ask a few questions or a partner dropping in to work from here.  We love our new, NYC space.

We had a spectacular reception this week to celebrate the opening of this office with customers, partners and the dotmailer leadership team in attendance. Please take a look at the photos from our event on Facebook.

Guests and the team at dotmailer's new NYC office warming party

Guests and the team at dotmailer’s new NYC office warming party

  1. What did you learn from your days in the start-up space that you’re applying at dotmailer?

The start-up space is a great place to learn. You have to know where every dollar is going and coming from, so every choice you make needs to be backed up with a business case for that investment.  You try lots of different things to see if they’ll work and you’re ready to turn those tactics up or down quickly based on an assessment of the results. You also learn things don’t have to stay the way they are, and can change if you make them change. You always listen and learn – to customers, partners, industry veterans, advisors, etc. to better understand what’s working and not working.  dotmailer has been in business for 18 years now, and so there are so many great contributors across the business who know how things have worked and yet are always keen to keep improving.  I am constantly in listening and learning mode so that I can understand all of the unique perspectives our team brings and what we need to act on.

  1. What are your plans for the U.S. and the sales function there?

On our path to being the market leader in the U.S., I’m focused on three things going forward: 1 – I want our customers to be truly happy.  It’s already a big focus in the dotmailer organization – and we’re working hard to understand their challenges and goals so we can take product and service to the next level. 2 – Creating an even more robust program around partners, resellers and further building out our channel partners to continuously improve sales and customer service programs. We recently launched a certification program to ensure partners have all the training and resources they need to support our mutual customers.  3 – We have an aggressive growth plan for the U.S. and I’m very focused on making sure our team is well trained, and that we remain thoughtful and measured as we take the steps to grow.  We want to always keep an eye on what we’re known for – tools that are powerful and simple to use – and make sure everything else we offer remains accessible and valuable as we execute our growth plans.

  1. What are the most common questions that you get when speaking to a prospective customer?

The questions we usually get are around price, service level and flexibility.  How much does dotmailer cost?  How well are you going to look after my business?  How will you integrate into my existing stack and then my plans for future growth? We now have three transparent bundle options with specifics around what’s included published right on our website.  We have introduced a customer success team that’s focused only on taking great care of our customers and we’re hearing stories every day that tells me this is working.  And we have all of the tools to support our customers as they grow and to also integrate into their existing stacks – often integrating so well that you can use dotmailer from within Magento, Salesforce or Dynamics, for example.

  1. Can you tell us about the dotmailer differentiators you highlight when speaking to prospective customers that seem to really resonate?

In addition to the ones above – ease of use, speed of use and the ability to scale with you. With dotmailer’s tiered program, you can start with a lighter level of functionality and grow into more advanced functionality as you need it. The platform itself is so easy to use that most marketers are able to build campaigns in minutes that would have taken hours on other platforms. Our customer success team is also with you all the way if ever you want or need help.  We’ve built a very powerful platform and we have a fantastic team to help you with personalized service as an extended part of your team and we’re ready to grow with you.

  1. How much time is your team on the road vs. in the office? Any road warrior tips to share?

I’ve spent a lot of time on the road, one year I attended 22 tradeshows! Top tip when flying is to be willing to give up your seat for families or groups once you’re at the airport gate, as you’ll often be rewarded with a better seat for helping the airline make the family or group happy. Win win! Since joining dotmailer, I’m focused on being in office and present for the team and customers as much as possible. I can usually be found in our new, NYC office where I spend a lot of time with our team, in customer meetings, in trainings and other hosted events, sales conversations or marketing meetings. I’m here to help the team, clients and partners to succeed, and will always do my best to say yes! Once our prospective customers see how quickly and efficiently they can execute tasks with dotmailer solutions vs. their existing solutions, it’s a no-brainer for them.  I love seeing and hearing their reactions.

  1. Tell us a bit about yourself – favorite sports team, favorite food, guilty pleasure, favorite band, favorite vacation spot?

I’m originally from Yorkshire in England, and grew up just outside York. I moved to the U.S. about seven years ago to join a very fast growing startup, we took it from 5 to well over 300 people which was a fantastic experience. I moved to NYC almost two years ago, and I love exploring this great city.  There’s so much to see and do.  Outside of dotmailer, my passion is cars, and I also enjoy skeet shooting, almost all types of music, and I love to travel – my goal is to get to India, Thailand, Australia and Japan in the near future.

Want to find out more about the dotfamily? Check out our recent post about Darren Hockley, Global Head of Support.

Reblogged 1 year ago from blog.dotmailer.com

The perfect local SEO landing page

Columnist Marcus Miller shares tips, advice and an infographic on creating highly optimized, high-converting landing pages for local SEO.

The post The perfect local SEO landing page appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 year ago from feeds.searchengineland.com