The Votes Have Been Counted and the Winner is…

It would be hubris to think that these results are solely down to the email programs of the different parties but email surely played its part.

At the end of the day, political parties sell personalities. They talk about policies but those only matter if the voters have faith in the politicians who turn those policies into law. In other words, it is all about relationships. As we all know, email is the best channel for building relationships and the channel through which consumers want to build and maintain relationships with brands.

Both Labour and the Liberal Democrats did a better job of building these relationships. First, they sent more emails. It is always a fine balance of sending enough and sending too many but clearly the three or four emails sent by the Conservatives did not do the job. Similarly, the emails from Labour and the Liberal Democrats were a good mix of putting forth their policies and partisan campaigning with messages designed to motivate their supporters to get out and vote on the day.

Where all of the parties fell down was in nurturing undecided voters. They all assumed that people signing up to receive their emails were die-hard supporters. There was no attempt made to identify where we were on our journey to supporting their party. This caused issues right from the start. In many cases, we thought we were signing up to receive emails and we found ourselves on pages that talked about “membership,” “accounts” and “public profiles”. Instead, they should have asked to get to know us better with questions like:

  • What is your relationship with the party?
  • What issues interest you?
  • Are you planning to vote?

Email is the best marketing tool for building relationships and relationships are built on two-way communications. The political parties that actually bothered to send emails made little to no effort to build relationships with their email programs. Labour and the Liberal Democrats were both in the little effort camp and that effort paid off on polling day.

The post The Votes Have Been Counted and the Winner is… appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 6 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

And the winner is…

We held a contest and received entries from Magento developers around the world. After much anticipation, we are very excited to announce that Simon Sprankel will be joining the dotmailer team at this year’s Magento Imagine conference! We got to sit down and learn a little bit more about our lucky winner…

When did you become a Magento developer?

Good question! I just had a look at the local.xml of one of my oldest shops and fortunately, it matched my memories. I started playing with it in 2010 with Magento 1.3 and my first shop was released in 2011 (Magento 1.4, I guess). It was a small shop for the boss of a local store, where I worked as an assistant. The online shop was first built with xt:Commerce and after a while, it was no longer a suitable solution any more. I studied computer science, so I got the request to look for a new solution. Magento was clearly the new rising star in the ecommerce stratosphere, so I quickly decided for go with it. And so, the journey began…

Until mid-2014, I developed Magento stores on a part-time basis during my studies. Since October 2014, I have been doing it full time as a freelancer. I started selling extensions under the name of Modulwerft last year as well.

Tell us what you like most about Magento?

I really love the flexibility of Magento – you can simply customize it to your needs. You can develop customizations in a clean and future-proof way. This got a major bump with M2 as well. Now, finally being able to contribute to the Magento core via GitHub is a big plus as well.

Besides these technical advantages, it is the Magento community, which makes working in this area fun. The Magento community is open, friendly and cooperative – this is amazing! I love getting to know new people or meeting old colleagues on conferences, hackathons and other events.

Have you attended Imagine before?

No, I have not, so I am sooo excited to go there! For a freelancer from Europe, all the costs for Imagine are too high to justify it from a business perspective. Hence, this seems to be a one-time opportunity to experience this core Magento event. I have been to quite a few European Magento conferences so far, so I am looking forward to comparing Imagine with those. I guess Americans tend to create even more thrilling events and know how to party, so this should be fun!

What are you looking forward to at this Imagine?

I am really looking forward to just being there; I have heard a few things, but could never really understand it all. What will probably make this event unique for me is that I will meet people from the American Magento community. I know many people from Germany and many from Europe as well, but I have never met any American community members in person. So come and say hello!

Apart from that, I guess the sessions will be awesome as well. Many people propose talks for Imagine and only a few are accepted, so the quality should be quite high.

What are the top sessions you are looking forward to attending?

I think there are three sessions I am looking forward to the most. First, “How to Pass the Magento Marketplace Extension Quality Program” since I am trying to grow my extension business, so this is a highly important topic for me. Second, “Expert Guidance on Migrating from Magento 1 to Magento 2”, because I have many existing customers, which need to be migrated to Magento and because Magento 2 will finally be my start of using composer (yay!). Lastly, “Making Your Life Easier with the Magento 2 CLI”, because you never know enough about the CLI.

Simon’s top sessions:

Who do you think are the top influencers and people you are looking forward to seeing at Imagine?

There are so many great people and influencers in the Magento community, that this is a tough question. I am especially looking forward to meet people from the American Magento community. For instance, Kalen Jordan, Phillip Jackson and Brendan Falkowski directly come into my mind.

Have you been to Las Vegas before? What do you love and hate about LV?

I have never been to Las Vegas before. So if anyone wants to give me a sightseeing tour on Saturday, tell me! 😉

The Magento Community is definitely very unique and valuable to the Magento ecosystem, tell us what makes it so special?

What makes the Magento community so special is that it feels like a big group of friends. There is no real negative competition. People care about each other, meet at events in their free time, share cars on their way to events, travel around the world to meet etc. I hope this will remain the same for many years…

What’s your casino game of choice?

To be honest, I have never been in a real casino and was never really into this whole gambling thing… Let us see if this changes in Las Vegas!

Simon still has one more week until he hits the Las Vegas strip (and the conference rooms) but we think he has already hit the jackpot!

The post And the winner is… appeared first on The Email Marketing Blog.

Reblogged 8 months ago from blog.dotmailer.com

I Can’t Drive 155: Meta Descriptions in 2015

Posted by Dr-Pete

For years now, we (and many others) have been recommending keeping your Meta Descriptions shorter than
about 155-160 characters. For months, people have been sending me examples of search snippets that clearly broke that rule, like this one (on a search for “hummingbird food”):

For the record, this one clocks in at 317 characters (counting spaces). So, I set out to discover if these long descriptions were exceptions to the rule, or if we need to change the rules. I collected the search snippets across the MozCast 10K, which resulted in 92,669 snippets. All of the data in this post was collected on April 13, 2015.

The Basic Data

The minimum snippet length was zero characters. There were 69 zero-length snippets, but most of these were the new generation of answer box, that appears organic but doesn’t have a snippet. To put it another way, these were misidentified as organic by my code. The other 0-length snippets were local one-boxes that appeared as organic but had no snippet, such as this one for “chichen itza”:

These zero-length snippets were removed from further analysis, but considering that they only accounted for 0.07% of the total data, they didn’t really impact the conclusions either way. The shortest legitimate, non-zero snippet was 7 characters long, on a search for “geek and sundry”, and appears to have come directly from the site’s meta description:

The maximum snippet length that day (this is a highly dynamic situation) was 372 characters. The winner appeared on a search for “benefits of apple cider vinegar”:

The average length of all of the snippets in our data set (not counting zero-length snippets) was 143.5 characters, and the median length was 152 characters. Of course, this can be misleading, since some snippets are shorter than the limit and others are being artificially truncated by Google. So, let’s dig a bit deeper.

The Bigger Picture

To get a better idea of the big picture, let’s take a look at the display length of all 92,600 snippets (with non-zero length), split into 20-character buckets (0-20, 21-40, etc.):

Most of the snippets (62.1%) cut off as expected, right in the 141-160 character bucket. Of course, some snippets were shorter than that, and didn’t need to be cut off, and some broke the rules. About 1% (1,010) of the snippets in our data set measured 200 or more characters. That’s not a huge number, but it’s enough to take seriously.

That 141-160 character bucket is dwarfing everything else, so let’s zoom in a bit on the cut-off range, and just look at snippets in the 120-200 character range (in this case, by 5-character bins):

Zooming in, the bulk of the snippets are displaying at lengths between about 146-165 characters. There are plenty of exceptions to the 155-160 character guideline, but for the most part, they do seem to be exceptions.

Finally, let’s zoom in on the rule-breakers. This is the distribution of snippets displaying 191+ characters, bucketed in 10-character bins (191-200, 201-210, etc.):

Please note that the Y-axis scale is much smaller than in the previous 2 graphs, but there is a pretty solid spread, with a decent chunk of snippets displaying more than 300 characters.

Without looking at every original meta description tag, it’s very difficult to tell exactly how many snippets have been truncated by Google, but we do have a proxy. Snippets that have been truncated end in an ellipsis (…), which rarely appears at the end of a natural description. In this data set, more than half of all snippets (52.8%) ended in an ellipsis, so we’re still seeing a lot of meta descriptions being cut off.

I should add that, unlike titles/headlines, it isn’t clear whether Google is cutting off snippets by pixel width or character count, since that cut-off is done on the server-side. In most cases, Google will cut before the end of the second line, but sometimes they cut well before this, which could suggest a character-based limit. They also cut off at whole words, which can make the numbers a bit tougher to interpret.

The Cutting Room Floor

There’s another difficulty with telling exactly how many meta descriptions Google has modified – some edits are minor, and some are major. One minor edit is when Google adds some additional information to a snippet, such as a date at the beginning. Here’s an example (from a search for “chicken pox”):

With the date (and minus the ellipsis), this snippet is 164 characters long, which suggests Google isn’t counting the added text against the length limit. What’s interesting is that the rest comes directly from the meta description on the site, except that the site’s description starts with “Chickenpox.” and Google has removed that keyword. As a human, I’d say this matches the meta description, but a bot has a very hard time telling a minor edit from a complete rewrite.

Another minor rewrite occurs in snippets that start with search result counts:

Here, we’re at 172 characters (with spaces and minus the ellipsis), and Google has even let this snippet roll over to a third line. So, again, it seems like the added information at the beginning isn’t counting against the length limit.

All told, 11.6% of the snippets in our data set had some kind of Google-generated data, so this type of minor rewrite is pretty common. Even if Google honors most of your meta description, you may see small edits.

Let’s look at our big winner, the 372-character description. Here’s what we saw in the snippet:

Jan 26, 2015 – Health• Diabetes Prevention: Multiple studies have shown a correlation between apple cider vinegar and lower blood sugar levels. … • Weight Loss: Consuming apple cider vinegar can help you feel more full, which can help you eat less. … • Lower Cholesterol: … • Detox: … • Digestive Aid: … • Itchy or Sunburned Skin: … • Energy Boost:1 more items

So, what about the meta description? Here’s what we actually see in the tag:

Were you aware of all the uses of apple cider vinegar? From cleansing to healing, to preventing diabetes, ACV is a pantry staple you need in your home.

That’s a bit more than just a couple of edits. So, what’s happening here? Well, there’s a clue on that same page, where we see yet another rule-breaking snippet:

You might be wondering why this snippet is any more interesting than the other one. If you could see the top of the SERP, you’d know why, because it looks something like this:

Google is automatically extracting list-style data from these pages to fuel the expansion of the Knowledge Graph. In one case, that data is replacing a snippet
and going directly into an answer box, but they’re performing the same translation even for some other snippets on the page.

So, does every 2nd-generation answer box yield long snippets? After 3 hours of inadvisable mySQL queries, I can tell you that the answer is a resounding “probably not”. You can have 2nd-gen answer boxes without long snippets and you can have long snippets without 2nd-gen answer boxes,
but there does appear to be a connection between long snippets and Knowledge Graph in some cases.

One interesting connection is that Google has begun bolding keywords that seem like answers to the query (and not just synonyms for the query). Below is an example from a search for “mono symptoms”. There’s an answer box for this query, but the snippet below is not from the site in the answer box:

Notice the bolded words – “fatigue”, “sore throat”, “fever”, “headache”, “rash”. These aren’t synonyms for the search phrase; these are actual symptoms of mono. This data isn’t coming from the meta description, but from a bulleted list on the target page. Again, it appears that Google is trying to use the snippet to answer a question, and has gone well beyond just matching keywords.

Just for fun, let’s look at one more, where there’s no clear connection to the Knowledge Graph. Here’s a snippet from a search for “sons of anarchy season 4”:

This page has no answer box, and the information extracted is odd at best. The snippet bears little or no resemblance to the site’s meta description. The number string at the beginning comes out of a rating widget, and some of the text isn’t even clearly available on the page. This seems to be an example of Google acknowledging IMDb as a high-authority site and desperately trying to match any text they can to the query, resulting in a Frankenstein’s snippet.

The Final Verdict

If all of this seems confusing, that’s probably because it is. Google is taking a lot more liberties with snippets these days, both to better match queries, to add details they feel are important, or to help build and support the Knowledge Graph.

So, let’s get back to the original question – is it time to revise the 155(ish) character guideline? My gut feeling is: not yet. To begin with, the vast majority of snippets are still falling in that 145-165 character range. In addition, the exceptions to the rule are not only atypical situations, but in most cases those long snippets don’t seem to represent the original meta description. In other words, even if Google does grant you extra characters, they probably won’t be the extra characters you asked for in the first place.

Many people have asked: “How do I make sure that Google shows my meta description as is?” I’m afraid the answer is: “You don’t.” If this is very important to you, I would recommend keeping your description below the 155-character limit, and making sure that it’s a good match to your target keyword concepts. I suspect Google is going to take more liberties with snippets over time, and we’re going to have to let go of our obsession with having total control over the SERPs.

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New SEO solutions is a trusted SEO company & new SEO winner – #5

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Try Your Hand at A/B Testing for a Chance to Win the Email Subject Line Contest

Posted by danielburstein

This blog post ends with an opportunity for you to win a stay at the ARIA in Vegas and a ticket to
Email Summit, but it begins with an essential question for marketers…

How can you improve already successful marketing, advertising, websites and copywriting?

Today’s Moz blog post is unique. Not only are we going to teach you how to address this challenge, we’re going to offer an example that you can dig into to help drive home the lesson.

Give the people what they want

Some copy and design is so bad, the fixes are obvious. Maybe you shouldn’t insult the customer in the headline. Maybe you should update the website that still uses a dot matrix font.

But when you’re already doing well, how can you continue to improve?

I don’t have the answer for you, but I’ll tell you who does – your customers.

There are many tricks, gimmicks and technology you can use in marketing, but when you strip away all the hype and rhetoric, successful marketing is pretty straightforward –
clearly communicate the value your offer provides to people who will pay you for that value.

Easier said than done, of course.

So how do you determine what customers want? And the best way to deliver it to them?

Well, there are many ways to learn from customers, such as focus groups, surveys and social listening. While there is value in asking people what they want, there is also a major challenge in it. “People’s ability to understand the factors that affect their behavior is surprisingly poor,” according to research from Dr. Noah J. Goldstein, Associate Professor of Management and Organizations, UCLA Anderson School of Management.

Or, as Malcolm Gladwell more glibly puts it when referring to coffee choices, “The mind knows not what the tongue wants.”

Not to say that opinion-based customer preference research is bad. It can be helpful. However, it should be the beginning and not the end of your quest.

…by seeing what they actually do

You can use what you learn from opinion-based research to create a hypothesis about what customers want, and then
run an experiment to see how they actually behave in real-world customer interactions with your product, marketing messages, and website.

The technique that powers this kind of research is often known as A/B testing, split testing, landing page optimization, and/or website optimization. If you are testing more than one thing at a time, it may also be referred to as multi-variate testing.

To offer a simple example, you might assume that customers buy your product because it tastes great. Or because it’s less filling. So you could create two landing pages – one with a headline that promotes that taste (treatment A) and another that mentions the low carbs (treatment B). You then send half the traffic that visits that URL to each version and see which performs better.

Here is a simple visual that Joey Taravella, Content Writer, MECLABS create to illustrate the concept…

That’s just one test. To really learn about your customers, you must continue the process and create a testing-optimization cycle in your organization – continue to run A/B tests, record the findings, learn from them, create more hypotheses, and test again based on these hypotheses.

This is true marketing experimentation, and helps you build your theory of the customer.

But you probably know all that already. So here’s your chance to practice while helping us shape an A/B test. You might even win a prize in the process.

The email subject line contest

The Moz Blog and MarketingExperiments Blog have joined forces to run a unique marketing experimentation contest. We’re presenting you with a real challenge from a real organization (VolunteerMatch) and
asking you to write a subject line to test (it’s simple, just leave your subject line as a comment in this blog post).

We’re going to pick three subject lines suggested by readers of The Moz Blog and three from the MarketingExperiments Blog and run a test with this organization’s customers. Whoever writes the best performing subject line will
win a stay at the ARIA Resort in Las Vegas as well as a two-day ticket to MarketingSherpa Email Summit 2015 to help them gain lessons to further improve their marketing.

Sound good? OK, let’s dive in and tell you more about your “client”…

Craft the best-performing subject line to win the prize

Every year at Email Summit, we run a live A/B test where the audience helps craft the experiment. We then run, validate, close the experiment, and share the results during Summit as a way to teach about marketing experimentation. We have typically run the experiment using MarketingSherpa as the “client” website to test (MarketingExperiments and MarketingSherpa are sister publications, both owned by MECLABS Institute).

However, this year we wanted to try something different and interviewed three national non-profits to find a new “client” for our tests.

We chose
VolunteerMatch – a nonprofit organization that uses the power of technology to make it easier for good people and good causes to connect. One of the key reasons we chose VolunteerMatch is because it is an already successful organization looking to further improve. (Here is a case study explaining one of its successful implementations – Lead Management: How a B2B SaaS nonprofit decreased its sales cycle 99%).

Another reason we chose VolunteerMatch for this opportunity is that it has three types of customers, so the lessons from the content we create can help marketers across a wide range of sales models. VolunteerMatch’s customers are:

  • People who want to volunteer (B2C)
  • Non-profit organizations looking for volunteers (non-profit)
  • Businesses looking for corporate volunteering solutions (B2B) to which it offers a Software-as-a-Service product through VolunteerMatch Solutions

Designing the experiment

After we took VolunteerMatch on as the Research Partner “client,” Jon Powell, Senior Executive Research and Development Manager, MECLABS, worked with Shari Tishman, Director of Engagement and Lauren Wagner, Senior Manager of Engagement, VolunteerMatch, to understand their challenges, take a look at their current assets and performance, and craft a design of experiments to determine what further knowledge about its customers would help VolunteerMatch improve performance.

That design of experiments includes a series of split tests – including the live test we’re going to run at Email Summit, as well as the one you have an opportunity to take part in by writing a subject line in the comments section of this blog post. Let’s take a look at that experiment…

The challenge

VolunteerMatch wants to increase the response rate of the corporate email list (B2B) by discovering the best possible messaging to use. In order to find out, MarketingExperiments wants to run an A/B split test to determine the
best messaging.

However the B2B list is relatively smaller than the volunteer/cause list (B2C) which makes it harder to test in (and gain
statistical significance) and determine which messaging is most effective.

So we’re going to run a messaging test to the B2C list. This isn’t without its challenges though, because most individuals on the B2C list are not likely to immediately connect with B2B corporate solutions messaging.

So the question is…

How do we create an email that is relevant (to the B2C list), which doesn’t ask too much, that simultaneously helps us discover the most relevant aspect of the solutions (B2B) product (if any)?

The approach – Here’s where you come in

This is where the Moz and MarketingExperiments community comes in to help.

We would like you to craft subject lines relevant to the B2C list, which highlight various benefits of the corporate solutions tool.

We have broken down the corporate solutions tool into three main categories of benefit for the SaaS product.
In the comments section below, include which category you are writing a subject line for along with what you think is an effective subject line.

The crew at Moz and MarketingExperiments will then choose the top subject line in each category to test. Below you will find the emails that will be sent as part of the test. They are identical, except for the subject lines (which you will write) and the bolded line in the third paragraph (that ties into that category of value).

Category #1: Proof, recognition, credibility


Category #2: Better, more opportunities to choose from


Category #3: Ease-of-use

About VolunteerMatch’s brand

Since we’re asking you to try your hand at crafting messaging for this example “client,” here is some more information about the brand to inform your messaging…


VolunteerMatch’s brand identity


VolunteerMatch’s core values

Ten things VolunteerMatch believes:

  1. People want to do good
  2. Every great cause should be able to find the help it needs
  3. People want to improve their lives and communities through volunteering
  4. You can’t make a difference without making a connection
  5. In putting the power of technology to good use
  6. Businesses are serious about making a difference
  7. In building relationships based on trust and excellent service
  8. In partnering with like-minded organizations to create systems that result in even greater impact
  9. The passion of our employees drives the success of our products, services and mission
  10. In being great at what we do

And now, we test…

To participate, you must leave your comment with your idea for a subject line before midnight on Tuesday, January 13, 2015. The contest is open to all residents of the 50 US states, the District of Columbia, and Canada (excluding Quebec), 18 or older. If you want more info, here are the
official rules.

When you enter your subject line in the comments section, also include which category you’re entering for (and if you have an idea outside these categories, let us know…we just might drop it in the test).

Next, the Moz marketing team will pick the subject lines they think will perform best in each category from all the comments on The Moz Blog, and the MarketingExperiments team will pick the subject lines we think will perform the best in each category from all the comments on the MarketingExperiments Blog.

We’ll give the VolunteerMatch team a chance to approve the subject lines based on their brand standards, then test all six to eight subject lines and report back to you through the Moz and MarketingExperiments blogs which subject lines won and why they won to help you improve your already successful marketing.

So, what have you got? Write your best subject lines in the comments section below. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

Related resources

If you’re interested in learning more about marketing experimentation and A/B testing, you might find these links helpful…

And here’s a look at a previous subject line writing contest we’ve run to give you some ideas for your entry…


Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Reblogged 2 years ago from moz.com

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